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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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SUB TURRI 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02 1 Gl 



yiniMient's insight is 

sometimes worth a life 's 

experience. " 

Oliver WendellJIolmes 





2 Opening 



SfifCH/VES 





Stephen J. Anlonik 






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Sicplicn ,1 Antonik 



Opening 3 



"^ejuithful to that which exists 

nowhere but in yourself— and thus 

make yourself indispensable. " 

^ndre Gide 




4 Opening 



'J-[e who would learn 

tojly one day must 

first learn to stand and 

walk and run and 
climb and dance; one 
cannot fiy into flying. 

J^riedrich 




6 Opening 





Opening 7 




I Opening 




"Man makes holy 
what he beliepes, as he 
makes beautiful what 



helopes. 



7f 



Ernest ^nan 




Stephen J. Anionik 



Stephen J. Antonik 



Opening 9 




10 Opening 




\ess IS a 
way of travel — not a destination. 



79 



^yM. Goodman 






Opening 11 



"The great thing in this woHdis 

not so much where we stand, as in 

what direction we are moving. '' 

Oliver WendellJTolnws 




opening 13 




'Sveryon^as a talent. What is 
rare is the courage to follow the 
talent to the dark places where it 

leads. '' 




8ricaJong 




« 

^ 



14 Opening 




Opening 15 







society IS 
one that exhibits the 
Jive qualities of truth, 
beauty, adpenture, art, 
and peace. " 

Alfred JSforth 
Whitehead 





16 Opening 




Opening 17 



"When one door of happiness 

closes, another opens; but often we 

look so long at the closed door that 

we do not see the one which has 

been opened for us. " 

J^elen (JCeller 




18 Opening 




20 Opening 



"(JCnowledgeofwhatis 
possible is the beginning of 
happiness. 




Opening 21 




22 Opening 






^3B{ '^man does what he 

must --in spite of 

personal consequences, 

in spite Oj 

and dangers and 

pressures — and that is 

the basis of all 

morality. " 

John MsKennedy 




Opening 23 





BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Members of the Class of 1995: 

In May of 1994, I thought I had voiced itiy last farewell to a 
graduating class of Boston College. What a loss would have been 
mine, had I not served as President during the senior year of the 
Class of 1995. 

Autumn in Boston during your final year at the College made 
the glories of the last fifty New England Falls pale in comparison 
with the golden sunshine and warmth through Thanksgiving. And what 
memorable events unrolled through those golden days— on the playing 
fields and in musical performance, in the classroom and in the 
countless simple exchanges that seal lifelong friendships. 

Even the wider world relaxed some of its more threatening 
airs when age-old enemies in the Mid East and in Northern Ireland 
took their first determined steps toward peace. 

As you graduate from Boston College, our world is more 
hopeful than at any other time in the past four decades. You bring 
to that world your own youthful hopes and gifts that are uniquely 
yours. More importantly, you carry with you ideals esteemed and 
articulated by this Jesuit University, as well as Alma Mater's 
loving hope that your life will manifest those ideals in the 
quality of the decisions you make. 

You take with you my thanks for the imagination and 
thought fulness that you have made a part of the spirit of Boston 
College. I pray that the friendships among you remain ever strong 
and that faith, understanding, and service to others will be your 
enduring loyalties as sons and daughters of Boston College. 

Sincerely, 



J. Donald Monan, S.J. 
President 




24 Opening 




J. i)onald Monan, SJ. 

President 



opening 2^ 




26 # Shining Through 



*• 




CURRENT 




The Year in Review 



In 1992, President-elect Bill Clinton called for change. In 
light of what happened this year, it proved to be a 
prophetic statement. Heroes rose and heroes fell. People 
found hope in the face of disaster. While our government 
hoped to make the country safer, we still had to confront the 
dangerous forces of nature. Civil wars raged in parts of the 
world, while democracy and peace were restored, and the 
Middle East continued on the road to lasting peace. We had 
hope in those who overcame challenges to better the world, 
while those we once admired fell from grace. Our traditions 
have changed, and the torch has been passed to a new 
generation. A year filled with emotion, many chose to shine 
through the shadows cast by others. 



Photos by R M Photo Service, Inc. 
Photos and Captions Compiled by the Sub Turri Editorial Board 



Current Events S^ 27 



TilBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL 

Nelson Mandela was elected to govern the turbulent nation of 
South Africa. The 76-year-old leader won this position in the 
country's first all-race election, effectively ending the white 
minority rule, and making Mandela the first black South African 
leader. 

Mandela won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, and is often 
lauded for leading the citizens of South Africa through a peaceful 
revolution many had thought was impossible. Faced with 
criticism that he was too slow to accomplish his goals, Mandela 
said people must be realistic. He said that a lack of trained 
workers and proper communications make rapid development 
impossible. 





I 



Tribal warfare plagues Rwanda 



28 Current Events 



After years of sparring between the the Huitus and the Tutsi minority in the African country of 
Rwanda, a peace accord was signed in 1 993 . But less than a year later, more than a million refugees 
were forced to flee to Zaire and other neighboring countries following the electoral victories of the 
mainly Tutsi Rwanda Patriotic Front. Disease killed thousands of refugees in several camps, while 
the United Nations estimates that more than 500,000 have been killed in tribal massacres. 

I 




World cup 

The 1 994 World Cup soccer 
competition was played in the 
United States for the first time. 
Teams from around the world 
converged on many major U.S. 
cities, including Boston at 
Foxboro Stadium for the 
month-long event. 

The U.S. team advanced to 
the second round of the 
tournament, losing to the 
eventual champion, Brazil. 

An estimated 2 billion people 
worldwide watched the final 
match between Brazil and Italy, 
which ended in an overtime 
shootout, 3-2, in Pasadena, CA. 



Middle east peace grows 

Almost a year after Israel signed the historic peace agreement 
with the Palestine Liberation Organization, the nation made an 
equally important pact with the country on their eastern border. 

After 46 years as enemies, Israel and Jordan made peace and 
all but ended the threat of another war between the Jewish state 
and its Arab neighbor. Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and 
Jordan's King Hussein met in public for the first time at a White 
House ceremony hosted by President Bill Clinton, signing "The 
Washington Declaration," which proclaimed: "The long conflict 
between the two states is now coming to an end. In this spirit the 
state of belligerency between Israel and Jordan has been 
terminated." 



Current Events 29 



Terror AT SEA 

Refugees fleeing the 
dictatorial regime of Fidel 
Castro were refused entry into 
the U.S. President Bill Clinton 
ended 28 years of favored 
treatment for Cuban refugees. 
He ordered U.S. ships to 
intercept fleeing Cubans and 
detain the passengers at the U.S . 
Navy base at Guantanamo Bay. 
Castro allov^ed the refugees to 
leave the island nation, causing 
tens of thousands to board 
make-shift vessels bound for 
Florida, in actions similar to 
the Mariel boat lifts of 1980. 




Republicans take congress 

In the 1 994 Congressional mid-term elections, the Republican 
Party gained control of both Houses of Congress for the first time 
in over 40 years. The election was used to tell the Congress and 
the President that the citizens of the U.S. are fed up with the way 
America is being run. 

Citizens hope that the Republican's "Contract with America" 
will reinvigorate the middle class by lowering taxes, balancing the 
budget, reforming welfare, and encouraging traditional values. 



30 Current Events 





Andre awes the crowd 

Andre Agassi became the crowd favorite at the U.S. Open 
Tennis Championship, held in New York, easily beating Michael 
Stich of Germany in the Final Match. The 24-year-old Agassi 
became the first unseeded player to win the U.S. Open crown 
since Fred Stolle in 1 966, and only the third player to do so in the 
114-year history of the prestigious tennis tournament. The 
victory gave Agassi his first U.S. Open title. 




Storms and floods plague the south 

Histor>' was made when Tropical Storm Alberto hit the southern U.S., and floods inundated 
orgia. The storm unloaded more than 20 inches of rain, causing floods, and killing 31 people, 
rty-nine counties were declared federal disaster areas, and about 46,000 people were driven 
■m their homes. In Albany, GA, 30,000 people were evacuated and 9,200 houses and apartments 
ire damaged or destroyed. 



Current Event 31 



MOSHING IN THE MUD 



The torch was passed in the summer of 1994. After hearing about the rock festival from their parents for 
25 years, a new generation of youth seized the opportunity and created their own Woodstock on a farm in 
Saugerties, NY. Several hundered thousands people attended the festival, enduring bad weather, and sloppy 
conditions. From folk music to heavy metal, the 4-day concert was filled with music almost 24-hours a day. 




IGHTING CRIME AT HOME 

President Clinton signed at $30 billion Crime Bill. The law bans 
the manufacture, sale, and possession of 1 9 specific types of assault- 
type weapons. It also allows for the use of the death penalty for more 
federal crimes, including drive-by shootings, and carjacking deaths. 
The law also authorizes billions of dollars over six years for prisons 
and additional police protection. Attorney General Janet Reno 
projects 20,000 new police officers by 1 996 as a result. 




32 Current Events 




On STRIKE! 

The baseball season ended 
early in 1 994. The players went 
on strike in August in response 
to team owners' demands for a 
salary cap. A month later, the 
owners voted to cancel the rest 
of the season, including the 
playoffs and the World Series. 
It was the eighth strike in 23 
seasons, causing the World 
Series to be missed for the first 
time since 1904. 




The trial of the century 

The trial of O.J. Simpson has drawn nation-wide interest since 
his infamous chase along the highways of southern California. 
He was accused of brutally murdering his ex-wife, Nicole Brown 
Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman. There was so much 
interest in the case that even the preliminary hearings were 
televised nationally. Simpson, as part of his defense, put together 
an expensive but experienced "dream team" of lawyers, led by 
Robert Shapiro. Prosecutor Marcia Clark represented the District 
Attorney's office, which is pursuing the case against Simpson. 



Current Events 33 



\^STERN WILDFIRES RAGE 

Forest fires swept across more than a dozen western states. An 
jight-year drought brought the United States its worst forest fires 
iince the 1920's, destroying some 3 million acres. Fierce fires 
cilled fourteen in Colorado, while thousands of other firefighters 
!'rom all over the country were mobilized to keep the fires under 
control. Though many were started by lightning, several were 
;aused by irresponsible campers and arsonists. 




Musical ACES 

A quartet from S weden hit the 
:harts this year with their Number 
3ne album "The Sign." Ace of 
Base was an instant success, 
drawing in listeners as their disco- 
Dretheren ABBA had done in the 
late 1970's. As one critic said, 
'Ace of Base wins with its 
infectious quasi-reggae, 
synthesizer-laced beat. The 
plain-Jane vocalizing of Jenny 
and Linn transforms the 12 tracks 
Df this album into universal sing- 
alongs." 




34 Current Events 




Poverty and political unrest 

In late 1990, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was elected President of 
Haiti after decades of dictatorship. Less than a year later, the 
Catholic priest was arrested in a military coup and expelled from 
the island nation. Coup leader Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras 
assumed presidential powers and again declared martial law, 
putting the Haitian army in charge of all governmental affairs. 

Earlier this year, a negotiating team, led by former President 
Jimmy Carter, struck a deal with the military rulers. The agreement 
reached stipulated that U.S. troops would occupy the island 
during a transition period eventaully leading to Aristide's return 
to power. At the height of the occupation, more than 20,000 
American troops were sent to Haiti. 



Overcoming challenges 

Deafness did not stop Heather Whitestone from achieving her 
goal of becoming Miss America. The 21 -year-old native of 
Birmingham, AL, became deaf at the age of 1 8 months following 
a reaction to a diptheria shot, leaving her with 5 percent hearing 
in her left ear. The junior at Jacksonville State University reads 
lips, uses a hearing aid, and knows sign language. Her hearing 
impairment did not impede her ballet performance at the Miss 
America competition, however, even though she could only hear 
the vibration of the music. 



Current Events 35 




36 # Shining Through 




ACADEMICS 

Striving to Excel 



\ 



•pl.fi«si' 



The Jesuit Tradition at Boston College encourages each 
student to attain a well-rounded education and to 
devote service to others. This tradition, exemplified through 
professors lectures, insights and dedication to excellence, 
provides students with the desire to learn and achieve. 
Students contemplated Plato, endured long laboratory 
reports, and spent endless hours in O 'Neill perfecting papers 
or cramming in a semester's worth of knowledge for finals. 
Through its strong liberal arts foundation, Boston College 
maintains its roots in the past while opening its doors to the 
future. With the unending support of the faculty and the 
strong desire of the student body, the wealth of opportunities 
that abound truly allow the academic life of Boston College 
to shine through. 




I V i 



Andrea Ritola 
Editor 



Academics #■ 37 




College of 

^rts §" Sciences 






38 College of Arts & Sciences 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL. MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3803 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

GFHCEOFTHEDEAN 

(617)552-3271 



To the Class of 1995: 



This has been a splendid class, which began its career at Boston College four years ago full 
of promise— and that promise has been amply fulfilled. Your academic accomplishments have been 
many; it has been a joy for me to honor many of you on the Dean's List and at the Dean's Scholars 
Dinner, while many of you will be celebrated this year as Scholars of the College. And all of you, 
whether or not you achieved this high level of academic distinction, have fulfilled your potential in 
important ways. In particular, your commitment to the service of others, in the spirit of the Jesuit 
tradition, has been generous-spirited. You have helped in many ways to build up the caring 
community we cherish at Boston College. 

You have seen many changes during your four years; the reopening of the magnificent 
Devlin Hall, bringing our Fine Arts Department at last to the Main Campus and our Boston College 
Museum of Art into full flower; the opening of the O'Connor Academic Development Center in 
O'Neill Library; the establishment of two new departments in the arts, the Department of Music 
and the Department of Theater; the emergence of our Capstone Program for seniors— and, most 
recently, the opening of two impressive new resident halls and a beautiful dining facility on the 
Lower Campus. 

But with all the changes, some things have remained the same. There is the same sense of 
intellectual challenge and excitement, the same warm sense of community for which Boston 
College is celebrated, the same commitment to the ideals of service to others. 

Boston College will continue to change-as any institution must-but will always remain, in 
its essentials, the same. "To thine own self be true," Polonius said to Horatio, and Boston College 
promises to do just that. When you return to visit, as I hope you will often do, you will see 
changes as the years go by, but we trust it will always be what it has been for you-a community 
founded on faith in God, on loving concern for one another, and on the sense of our larger 
responsibility to the world around us. 

As alumni and alumnae of Boston College you will carry the light of faith and love 
wherever you go, and we know that the world will be a better, more just, and more caring place 
because of what you bring to it— in your work, in your family lives, and in your community. The 
Lord bring you and all your loved ones peace and joy for all the years to come! 




cfT^i!^-c/-u^<X^>--C^<^ "^ ' 7 - 



J. Robert Barth, S.J. 
Dean 




College of Arts & Sciences 39 



College of the 

^rts §" Sciences 



% 



The College of Arts and Sciences has 
the largest enrollment at Boston 
College as well as being the oldest of the 
four schools. The many buildings seen 
around campus represent the diversity 
found in the subject matter included 
under the title of Arts and Sciences. 
Whether it is Gasson with the Arts and 
Sciences Jenks Library, Higgins with its 
many biology labs, Merkert with its 
chemistry labs, or McGuinn with its 
multitude of history courses, the spectrum 
of Arts and Sciences is immense. Subjects 
range from Sociology, Computer Science, 
English and Biology, to the Faith, Peace, 
and Justice program and many more. 

Students start with a basic core 
curriculum and establish a firm liberal 
arts foundation. With this diverse 
beginning they branch out into a selected 
major or program. Additionally there is 
the possibility of individual programs 
because any student with outside interests 
can develop their own major or minor. 
Also for those students who have displayed 
exceptional skill in the academic forum 
there is the Honors Program. This program 



Right: An Art student looks through the stacks to 
find his work. 



offers a unique fulfillment of the core 
curriculum and invites the students to 
open their minds to all aspects of the 
world around them. It is an open, 
interactive chance to learn more about 
truly achieving a solid liberal arts 
education. 

The opportunities available for 
students in Arts and Sciences are limited 
only by an individual's imagination. 
Students can serve the community in a 
variety of ways, whether through a 
Boston College program such as Pulse, or 
on a student initiated individual program. 

There are many career advancement 
opportunities available to Arts and Sciences 
students extending from internships to 
research assistantships, as well as career 
placement services. The College of Arts and 
Sciences is but one of the many fine 
programs here at BC. 

-Mary M. Keefe 






40 Arts & Sciences 




Left: At home in the lab, a Biology student 
prepares for the next experiment. 

Bottom Left: This student is hard at work 
performing an Organic Chemistry lab in Merkert. 

Below: Art in the making; Studio Art students 
having class in Devlin. 




%*; 




Juicpli B. Plurad 



Arts & Sciences 41 




Carroll School of 




42 Wallace E. 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3808 



THE WALLACE E- CARROLL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 



Dear Friends, 

This is an unusual time in your life, full of both nostalgia and apprehension. It says quite a 
bit about us as a people that we tend to look back fondly on everything from music to fountain 
pens, rather than eagerly seeking the new and only partly explored. What causes us to seek such 
solace in the comforts of the past, especially when few have been better prepared to face a future 
full of change? 

In just a short time you will take leave of a rock that has so quickly become a second home. 
Most older folks would gladly swap their years of experience for the challenge and time you have 
ahead. You come to this future well equipped. Although you may not have noticed, you have 
changed a lot these past few years. It continues to amaze me that despite all the messy untidiness 
of a liberal professional education at a Jesuit University, the process works remarkably well. 
People who leave here have changed in several distinct ways. 

As you leave you understand much more about God's good world, about how and why 
some of the pieces fit and behave the way they do; about how language names and determines how 
we comprehend, from poetry to accounting; about how what we do, our work and how well we do 
it, is important for each of us and for the communities in which we find ourselves. For a variety of 
reasons, at the end of this millennium our work appears to define us as individuals. 
Understanding that this is imjx)rtant but that it is also a limited view of a person is precisely what a 
professional, hberal education is about. 

You have also changed because of the friends you have made and will keep. Faculty and 
administrators sometimes think that it is we who have had the greatest impact on graduates. 
Certainly what we do is fundamental, but the learning that comes from sharing lives for four years 
would seem to be at least as profound. Even when making good soup one is well advised to use 
the best ingredients one can find. So too a college, and you have each been blessed more grandly 
than you can now imagine by each other. 

Then there are the memories you will take, pictures that will become more impressionistic 
over the years. Those will be the keys that mediate between understanding and friendship, so I 
hope you take a large bagful with you. 

As Milan Kundera told us, "being" is so fragile. I hope you have learned to take care of 
each other and of all of us. Return often to these old stones. We will miss you and welcome you 

back. 




John J. Neuhauser 
Dean 



arroll School of Management 




Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 43 



School of 

Management 



The Wallace E. Carroll School of 
Management was founded in 1938. 
Even if you are not familiar with it's 
curriculum of challenging management 
classes and majors such as Accounting, 
Computer Science, or Marketing, one 
could not have missed the construction 
around the School of Management 
building, Fulton. 

No longer having to trek around 
campus to find advisors, the eagerly 
awaited reopening of the building occurred 
early in the second semester, and allowed 
Management students to finally return to 
their own building. Doubled in size and 
complete with Atrium, this beautiful 
building centralized the School of 
Management student body into one place 
and likewise centralized their professors. 
Outside of the Fulton Construction, 
it was business as usual for CSOM. In 



Right : Intended as an area for people to congregate, 
the Fulton Atrium has already become a big hit 
with students, regardless of their school. 



addition to the courses and majors offered by 
the School of Management, there are also 
opportunities for students who wish to 
become more fully involved with the 
planning occurring at Boston College and in 
their particular school. There is a CSOM 
Senate which is organized into four elected 
officials from each class. This senate works 
with the faculty and staff on important affairs 
that affect the School of Management and 
may in turn, encompass Boston College. 

The School also has an Honors 
Program which offers many honors courses 
for students who wish to participate. Along 
with the Management honors courses, 
students also participate in the Arts and 
Sciences Honor courses. Overall, the 
Management Degree at Boston College 
insures a well rounded person ready to 
face the professional world. 

-Grace Abromaitis 





44 Management 




Left: Still under construction, The CSOM Honors 

library begins to take shape. 

Bottom Left: Gleaming tiled floors, couches, 
balconies, and dual staircases coinprise just a part 
of the Atrium's beauty. 




Management 45 




School of 

Education 



46 School of Edi 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3813 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
CAMPION HALL 101 
(617) 552-4200 
(617) 552-0812 Fas 



To the Class of 1995: 

Congratulations! Your graduation represents a significant personal and 
professional accomplishment. You have acquired knowledge, skills, understanding, and 
values which have prepared you to confront the possibilities and challenges of the present 
and the uncertainties and promise of the future. Your commitment to serve others 
through the calling of education and human services reflects a generosity of spirit, an 
ethos of social justice, and caring which bodes well for our society. You will make a 
difference! 

You are entering a learning society. The universality of education in all its forms 
has resulted in the wide distribution of knowledge and skills and the continuing 
development of knowledge and skills. Your education is a beginning - a preparation for 
life long learning. Your departure from Boston College will bring new challenges for 
learning and professional development which will need to be matched by intellectual 
curiosity and the desire to excel and continually grow. Always be learners. 

Cherish your memories of Boston College. It is a special place of caring and 
intellectual challenge and excitement where you have lived, changed, and grown. Hold 
on to the memories of good times and the friendships which have marked your passage 
through the School of Education. Remember especially the joy of accomplishment when 
you taught your first class or helped your first client. And, finally, remember that the 
faculty, staff, and administrators have enjoyed working with you in advancing your 
personal and professional development. We have been privileged to be your teachers, 
mentors, and friends. 

We wish you every success. We are proud of you. We hope that you as alumni 
will stay in touch and visit the Heights often. May the peace of the Lord be always with 
you. 

Sincerely, 



, oinijciciy, >^ ^^ 



Gerald J. Pine 
Dean 






:ation 




Peter Mams 

School of Education 47 



School of 

Sducation 



For most college students, school bells 
and recess are memories of childhood 
to be reflected upon or forgotten, but to 
students of SOE, these symbols take on 
new meanings as they make the transition 
to the other side of the teacher's desk. 

The School of Education prepares 
students for their new role with a rigorous 
combination of classroom learning and 
hands on experience. Yet in addition to 
their difficult training and requirements. 
Education students themselves also 
witnessed a number of changes to their 
school this year as well. 

The 1994-95 year saw the arrival 
of both a new dean and a new playground. 
Dean Gerald J. Pine joined the faculty of 
the BC School of Education from Oakland 
University in Rochester, Michigan, where 
he served as the Dean of their School of 
Education and Human Services. Having 
authored or co-authored numerous books 



Right: An SOE student utilizing one of the many 
audiovisual aids available at the Educational 
Resource Center located in Campion Hall. 



and articles, serving on committees for 
education change, as well as attending to 
other academic pursuits. Dean Pine adds 
new dimensions to SOE. 

Another new dimension of SOE is 
the new playground at the Campus School. 
After two years of planning and 
fundraising, the playground was erected at 
the end of October. Students, faculty, and 
community members volunteered to build 
the playground which was designed to 
meet the needs of handicapped children 
attending the Campus School. 

These new dimensions add to the 
school's tradition of excellence in 
preparing students for professions in the 
fields of education and human services. 
Students soon to be on the other side of the 
desk will, no doubt, be an asset to the 
learning community. 

- Anne E. Marshall 



^^r ^ 
V 



.z_ 



l^ta. 



48 School of Education 




Left: The new playground at the Campus School, 
its building was just one of the many demonstrations 
of service by volunteers of the BC community. 

Bottom Left: Diana Bannan, student teaching 
abroad, is pictured with her first grade class at the 
American School in Holland. 




Photo courtesy of Diana Bannan 



School of Education 49 




50 School of Nu'sing 



Schoolo 




ursmQ" 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167-3812 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

(617) 552-4251 



Dear SON Graduating Class of 1995: 



Congratulati 
during your 
Nursing toge 
excellence i 
in health ca 
and decrease 
reduced the 
When you wer 
into jobs of 
acute care s 
decreased, 
need for nur 



ons on your g 
years at Bost 
ther and have 
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re delivery d 
d lengths of 
number of bed 
e freshman an 
their choice 
ettings, the 
Jobs in other 
ses with adva 



raduation and on all you have accomplished 
on College. You and I entered the School of 

spent the last four years striving for 
ive roles. We have witnessed profound changes 
uring this time. Due to financial constraints 
stay, hospitals have closed, merged, and 
s, thereby reducing jobs for staff nurses, 
d sophomores, our graduates were moving out 

In the last two years, opportunities in 
typical job choice following graduation, have 

settings have increased, however, as has the 
need practice skills. 



Projections indicate that there is still a shortage of baccalaureate 
prepared nurses, and an even larger shortage in master's prepared 
nurses. Your education at Boston College has provided you with the 
skills necessary to move into the new system of health delivery. In 
addition to the skills specific to nursing, your education has provided 
you with a liberal arts core, with a grounding in ethical decision 
making which acknowledges the importance of the principle of justice. 
This foundation should enable you to move into new, more autonomous and 
responsible roles within the health care system and to enter the best 
graduate programs in nursing. 

You will be the next leaders in nursing. Use your own special gifts 
coupled with the education you have received at Boston College to 
provide excellent service to your clients, and to make a difference in 
your profession. We hope that you will remain connected to this School 
of Nursing, visit us often, and help us as we seek to meet the needs of 
our students and prepare nurses for the next century. May God bless you 
as you begin your professional life. 



Sincerely, 



•^^y/zx^.^.'^r- 



Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., F.A.A.N 
Dean and Professor 




School of Nursing 5 1 



School o/jVursing 



The decision to pursue a career in the 
Health services, no doubt requires an 
unlimited dedication to people, and 
patience to help them with care and 
compassion. These traits are characteristic 
of students attending the School of 
Nursing. 

Founded in 1947, the Boston 
College School of Nursing offers an 
individualized Nursing School experience. 
Students receive personal attention under 
the guidance of experienced professors. 
Courses cover the care of children, adults, 
and the elderly, in both illness and wellness 
situations. 

Classes consist of both regular 
on-campus courses and labs, but also on- 
site training at Boston's Premier health- 
care institutions. One of the main goals of 
the School of Nursing is to build critical 
thinking in a clinical setting, stressing the 
importance of good judgment in decision 
making. 



Right: To become more accustomed with patient 
care, students practice taking each other's blood 
pressure. 



Besides its widely acclaimed and 
academically challenging curriculum, the 
School of Nursing is unique in fact that it 
is a pre-professional program in an 
undergraduate setting. Students graduate 
with not only a Bachelor's Degree in 
Science, but also clinical experience from 
working directly with local hospitals. 

Nursing students at Boston College 
have the additional benefit of working in 
one of the most advanced centers of 
medical care and research in the United 
States. Students are trained in a holistic 
approach to nursing, treating not only 
specific medical problems, but caring for 
the needs of the patient as a whole. 

Upon graduation, students in the 
School of Nursing are prepared to take the 
exam for licensing as Registered Nurses 
and are eager and willing to put what they 
have learned in practice for others. 

-Erika Dreyer 





Jason Reblando 



52 Nursing 



Left: Rooms such as this allow nurses in training 
the ability to practice in a real hospital setting. 

Bottom Left: Patient patients, these dummies will 
be instrumental in an important lesson. 

Below: Familiarizing herself with the ECG 
Machine, this students learns what to look for. 




Hnka Uinimlcr 



Nursing 53 




54 Evening College 




College 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



EVENING COLLEGE OF ARTS, SCIENCES 
AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



OFRCE OF THE DEAN 
(617)552-3900 



To the Class of 1995: 



Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. The talent, commitment and 
optimism you brought to studies will now be channeled in different directions, shared in new ways. 
You are ready. 

You are prepared to question, to seek answers and to respond. Having anchored your knowledge, 
convictions and attitudes in vigilant sympathy for others which is the essence of moral engagement, 
life's many changes will now always be examined in a defined context. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given circumstance. To 
secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing them is the highest 
expression of personal autonomy. 

Unlimited challenges await your response. Maximize every opportunity optimistically and with humor. 
For sixty-six years, graduates of the Evening College have gone forth into a world of upheaval and 
advanced the noblest human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. 



Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 




Evening College 55 




One should not have to be a full-time 
student to be able to acquire and 
obtain a quality education. It is on this 
premise that an academic tradition was 
started at Boston College. 

Since its founding in 1929, the 
Evening College has seen almost 5000 
students graduate with Boston College 
degrees. This setting opens the academic 
world to all types of students be they 
professional people, union members, or 
people studying just for the joy of learning. 

The theory is that people will profit 
from learning every time they open 
themselves up to the opportunities offered. 
New skills can be acquired or old ones 
reapplied. Every individual has something 
to learn. 



Right: An Evening College instructor lectures to 
the class. 



The Evening College also attempts 
to help serve its diverse population through 
the creation of its Senate. The Senate 
provides a forum and representation for 
the multi-faceted population of the College 
and helps to integrates the students into 
Boston College activities. Easily 
overlooked at BC, this group looks to not 
only unify its students, but also to keep 
them informed of campus events, Financial 
Aid information, and all other important 
aspects of the College as a whole. 

Overall, the Evening College is a 
unique chance for motivated, goal oriented 
students who want to learn more, but would 
not have had the chance otherwise. It is an 
academic opportunity of a lifetime, easily 
accessible in McGuinn Hall. 

-Grace Abromaitis 





ElenaVizvary 



56 Evening College 




Left: This student is about to make a statement to 
the class. 

Bottom Left: Sharing an informal moment before 
class, these students get better acquainted. 

Below: Concentrating on the evening's lecture, 
this student is dilligently taking notes. 




Elena Vizvary 



Elena Vizvary 



Evening College 57 



In the Silence... 



For the industrious Boston College 
student, Bapst Library is as beautiful 
as it is study condusive. Unlike O'Neill, 
one can always find a quiet seat at which 
to spend an evening studying. 

Since its doors first opened, 
thousands of students have spent their 
time in Gargan Hall, the main reading 
room, as well as in admiration of its 
impressive Gothic style, and beautiful 
stained glass windows. 

In addition to Bapst's structural 
beauty, there is its internal wealth of 
holdings. One can lose themselves 
amidst the collection of fiction works 



Right: Like the many volumes it houses, every 
window in Bapst tells a story. 



found, or in the depths of the vast Art 
Library housed in the basement. Even 
on the way to studing, there is the 
opportunity to stop and visit the office 
of the late Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr., 
36'; the Former Speaker of the House. 

Saving the best for last, the Rare 
Books Collection, found in the Bums 
Library, accessed by way of the 
Commonwealth Entrance, offers 
priceless, valuable collections of materials 
for academic and personal interest. 

Unique, beautiul, and quiet, 
Bapst signifies all that is timeless and 
impressive about a library. 

-Andrea Ritola 





58 Bapst Library 



Left: With light streaming through its Gothic 
windows, Gargan Hall is truly one of the most 
beautiful places on campus. 

Bottom Left: Outside of the main reading room, 
this student finds a comfortable spot to study. 

Below: Almost ageless, Bapst has served the 
numerous BC students well who have studied 
amidst its splendor. 




Pclcr Manis 



Bapst Library 59 



Something for 

Speryone 



You slowly trudge up Higgins stairs 
or hike down from upper campus. 
You reach the plaza and then you see 
it.. .O'Neill Library. A popular hangout, 
many students are seen talking on the 
stairs or taking a much deserved break 
from studying. Whether you have come to 
do research, study or just read the daily 
newspaper, you are at the right place. 

O'Neill Library is celebrating its 
tenth year as the B.C. Campus information 
center. The facility has many assests and 
students can be seen utilizing them all. 
There is a video center for people who 
need to watch a film for class or just relax. 
Microfiche is also available as is the hard 



Right: Oblivious to the view, concentrating 
students occupy O'Neill's bright window 
seats. 



copy of recent periodicals. There are vast 
shelves of books for researching and desks 
everywhere for those who just need to 
study. Many students can even be seen 
studying as a group in one of the fifth floor 
study rooms. 

For the panicked few who stream 
into the library right before the big paper 
or right around finals time, there are also 
plenty of O 'Neill employees ready to direct 
you to the right stack. All in all, O'Neill 
has served the students of B.C. well over 
the last ten years. 

-Grace Abromaitis 





60 O'Neill Library 



Left: Just one of the many study rooms In 
O'Neill, these are especially popular during 
exam time. 

Bottom Left: An important communication 
center, O'Neill is a great place to catch up on 
the latest news in your spare time. 




O'Neill Library 61 



^t your Service 



When the academic pressure of a 
course gets to be too much and one 
realizes that they cannot do it alone, help is 
not far away. Just a simple visit to the ADC 
can begin to alleviate some of that pressure. 

The Academic Development 
Center was created to help tutor students, 
and offer assistance to those people who 
may need a little clarification on various 
subjects. At no cost, students can come in 
and sign up for the help they might need. 

Convieniently located in O'Neill 
library, there are a wide number of course 
offerings available to students, covering 
anything from Math courses to History 
Core. There is also no limit on assistance, 
tutoring may range from a few sessions to 



Right: Help is just a step away, all one needs 
is the initiative to ask, and the persistence to 
stick with it. 



the whole semester. 

While a tutor can not magnificently 
boost your grade, they can help you to get 
the attention and direction that you might 
need, and that little extra added push may 
just make all the difference. 

It is a feeling of accomplishment 
when you are finally able to comprehend 
that Chemistry concept, or grasp that 
theorem. Yet, you do not share that 
sentiment alone. Some of that pride is 
shared by your tutor who helped you get 
there. Thus, to say that these tutors do a 
great service to the Boston College 
community, is definitely an 
understatement. 

- Andrea Ritola 





e 




„..,.-v(JM' 



4!^ 



The Cotii^^ 
Learnmr^ 
Centerj 



Joseph B.PIurad 



62 Academic Development Center 




Left: A tutor hard at work, helping to get the point 

across. 

Below: The ADC window in the O'Neill Atrium 
displays the wide variety of subjects available for 
tutorial aid. 



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Academic Development Center 63 



^defining 

Sducation 



Each year more than three hundred 
students, mostly Juniors and a few 
Seniors, choose to spend part of their 
Boston College experience abroad. Yet 
the Foreign Study Program is not merely 
a way to avoid the BC housing crunch. 

Under the direction of Prof. James 
F. Flagg, the Foreign Study Office, located 
in Gasson Hall, helps to place and arrange 
programs with other schools across the 
globe. 

While the most popular places 
happen to be Italy, France, or Spain, there 
are the occasional arrangements made for 
such exotic and exciting places as Morocco 
or Budapest. 

Studying abroad means usually 
rearranging the schedule of courses in a 
major. Every effort is made to allow 
students that wish to study abroad to be 



Right: In Budapest, this student stops to rest by 
the Fisherman's Bastran with Matthias Church in 
the background. 



able to do so. There are a number of 
programs well established between BC 
and other countries that cater to a student's 
specific needs and allows them to fulfil 
credits in order to take advantage of the 
program. For example, School of 
Education students are able to arrange 
student teaching abroad in addition to their 
classes. Such programs administered by 
BC are at University College, Cork, The 
University of Strasbourg, and the 
University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

Students choosing to study abroad 
gain a valuable experience in addition to 
being able to break away from the usual 
BC academic and social scene. Their trip 
no doubt endows them with a better 
appreciation of other cultures, their own, 
and just what defines education as a whole. 

-Andrea Ritola 





Photo counesy o! Brian Sniill 



64 Foreign Study Program 



^'^^ i^ 



Left: This majestic building, the Cathedral of 
Sevilla, Spain, is the largest cathedral in the world. 

Bottom Left: Diana Bannan and Kelly 
Cunningham pose beside this renowned and breath- 
taking view of Florence. 

Below: Anne Holbrook and Margaret Enis 
throwing coins in Italy's famous Trevi Fountain. 




Pholo Courtesy of Diana Bannan 



Foreign Study Program 65 



Grand designs 



The Boston College Museum of Fine 
Arts offers students, faculty, and 
guests the opportunity to view fine art. 
Located in the recently refurbished Devlin 
Hall, the museum offers both a permanent 
collection, as well as temporary exhibits 
which change periodically. 

The upper level of the Museum is 
devoted to special exhibitions, while the 
lower level is reserved for the permanent 
collection. The Museum's collection 
includes Gothic and Baroque tapestries, 
Italian Sixteenth and Seventeenth century 
painting, Japanese prints, and American 
landscapes from the Nineteenth and early 
Twentieth centuries. 

This year, the traveling shows 
covered a wide range of subjects. The 
exhibits were: Aaron Siskincl, Toward a 
Personal Vision 1935-1955; Pete- 
Repeat. -Installation by Mark Cooper and 

Top Right: The banner outside of Devlin Hall 
promoting last fall's exhibit. 

Right: Visitors gather at the opening of the Aaron 
Siskind exhibit. 

Below: Inside the museum, patrons of the museum 
view the works on display. 



Michael Mulhern ; Memory and the Middle 
Ages; Inspired by Nature: Contemporary 
Visions; and Protection, Power, and 
Display; Shields of Indonesia and the 
Pacific Basin. 

The Museum offers workshops, 
lectures, and gallery tours in an effort to 
help educate the community, and offers 
free admission to all guests. Visitors may 
also use the "Micro Gallery", an interactive 
computer that gives information about 
pieces in the permanent collection, as 
well as showing images of related works. 
In this way, the visitor can learn about the 
artist and the painting's history, as well as 
viewing the art itself. The BC Museum of 
Fine Arts is not only a welcome addition 
in an academic sense, but also a wonderful 
place nearby to appreciate the arts. 

-Erika Dreyer 



AARON SISKir^O: 
PERSONAL VISION 



Sep*«mber 30- December '»'^ 
^- . 1994 




66 Museum of Art 



^C WithJIonors 




Pctor Manis 

\bove: Fr. Barth inducts a new Alpha Sigma Nu 
Tiember. 

Right: The Alpha Sigma Nu banner, synonomous 
vvith "Scholarship, Loyalty, and Service." 



Challenging courses and curriculums 
are a large part of life here at Boston 
College. Recognition of those students 
who have demonstrated exceptional talents 
academically, coupled with service to the 
community, are the focus of Boston 
College's numerous Honor Societies. 

One such group is the Golden Key 
Society, which focuses on the excellence 
which signifies some of this nation's most 
intelligent students. Although the lifetime 
membership is on an invitation only basis, 
there areanumber of scholarships available 
for deserving Juniors and Seniors. 

"Scholarship, Loyalty, and 
Service", is the motto of Alpha Sigma 
Nu, the National Honor Society of Jesuit 
Colleges and Universities. Incorporated 
in 1915 at Marquette University, this 
highly selective society requires that 
students must maintain at least a 3.0 
GPA, and be in the top 15 percent of 
their class to be considered. In addition, 
only four percent of the Junior and 
Senior class at any school can be 
considered for eligibility. Since service 
is a condition of membership, students 
are expected to continue those activities 
that they participated in prior to 



acceptance. 

The Order of the Cross and Crown, 
an honor restricted to the Senior class, 
requires a 3.5 or above average GPA and 
active involvement at BC. A committee 
under direction of Fr. Barth, chooses 
students whom they feel exemplify the 
qualities of service and academic 
excellence. A few of the selected students 
are designated Marshals of the Cross and 
Crown, and the student chosen as Chief 
Marshal is given the honor of speaking at 
the Arts & Sciences Commencement. 

To reward and encourage 

scholarship through the selection of 

outstanding students, to promote 

advancement of education in Business 

through awards and recognition of 

outstanding institutions and chapters, and 

to foster integrity in the conduct of 

Business operations, are the three goals of 

Beta Gamma Sigma. This national 

organization, founded in 1913, is the 

highest recognition a student can receive 

in the field of business. Requirements 

mandate a ranking in the top seven 

percent of the Junior, or ten percent of 

the Senior class. 

-Andrea Ritola 




Honor Societies 67 



beyond Graduation 



The four years at B.C. are goal- 
oriented, work filled years with the 
aim of achieving a certain career in a 
desirable field. For many BC students the 
gateway from this student life to the great 
beyond is in a small brick house on 
Commonwealth Avenue. This two story 
building known as the Boston College 
Career Center is where many students 
find their career paths and the jobs they 
enter upon graduating. 

Always working to help and assist 
students in finishing what they need, the 
atmosphere of the Career Center is perhaps 
best represented by the "Please Interrupt 
Me" sign on the librarian's desk; everyone 
employed there wants to help in any way 
possible. 

The Career Center offers resources 
and programs for students of all years. 
Students unsure of their career goals often 
benefit from SIGI, direct contact with a 
career counselor, or books on career 
options found in the center's library. 
Programs and catalogs are also provided 



for students planning to attend graduate 
school. 

Students ready to get involved in 
a particular area or who want to try out 
different fields are assisted by the 
internship office. Placements are not 
handed out to students; the goal of the 
Career Center is to help students to find a 
suitable field and to learn the crucial 
techniques of how to get a job, rather than 
simply giving out positions. 

The BC Career Center is always 
active. During the 94-95 year the Career 
Center continued to assist BC students in 
finding their place in the Great Beyond 
with workshops, counseling, and the job 
placement program. The Career Center is 
becoming more than an upperclassman 
experience. Students of Freshman and 
Sophomore standing are utilizing the 
opportunities offered at the Center and 
getting a valuable headstart on their career 
plans. The Career Center looks to assist in 
any and all ways possible, thus becoming 
a valuable part of the B.C. experience. 

- Anne E. Marshall 



Right: The job search sometimes entails sifting 
through files to research information on prospective 
businesses. 




JoM.-|.li B Plurad 



68 Career Center 




Left: Anticipation. Students check the postings to 
see which companies will be coming to the Career 
Center for future interviews. 



Career Center 69 



TTfiP^ 




r 



70 & Shining Through 





m->m. 



STUDEN 





Beyond the Books 



Boston College has been a place that has become our 
home. The campus and its surroundings provide each 
individual with a variety of events to experience. Memories 
such as Homecoming, tailgating, concerts, guest lecturers 
and parties will always be reflected on fondly. Whether we 
were walking to class or storming the field, these moments 
have shaped us into who we are today. With Boston at our 
doorstep we took advantage of the offerings at our feet. Be 
it cappuccino in the North End, viewing the night time sky 
from the Hancock Observatory or having a hot dog at 
Fenway, students added life to the city. Education at Boston 
College was not just in the classroom but outside as well. We 
learned about life, ourselves and each other. 



Tracy Hofmann and Laura Spear 
Co-Editors 



Student Life ^71 



WiAin the Gates 



Below: The majestic towers of Gasson Hall 
protrude the cloudless sky as students make 
their way to class. 

Right: Students are constantly walking through 
the dustbowl on their way from class, to lunch, 
and back. 




"...And the towers on the Heights 
reach to Heaven's own blue." 

The clock tower in Gasson, Shea 
field, St. Mary 's chapel, O'Connell House: 
these and a million other spots give our 
Heights its unique character and make it 
what it is — a campus that, within four 
brief years, becomes for us all a beloved 
second home. 

At the highest peak of the Heights 
is Upper Campus, where Freshman and 
Sophomores bond over late-night snacks 
at the Club and study/relax sessions in 
O'Connell. A few miles away, fellow 
Freshman on Newton share the same 
experiences in Stuart and the Morgue. 

Middle Campus is home to some 
of B.C.'s most picturesque buildings. 
Bapst Library's stained glass and high 
vaulted ceilings lend solemnity and even a 
little divinity to finals cramming. Students 
crowd the quad in between classes, and, 
weather permitting, they flood the grassy 
dustbowl to eat lunch and hang out with 
friends. 

What would Lower Campus be 
without the legendary living quarters that 
strike fear into the heart of every parent 
and envy into the mind of every alum? 
Walsh, Edmonds, and the Mods: for those 
brave and socially prepared enough to 
inhabit them, there is no comparison to 
these perennial favorites. For lucky 
sophomores and juniors, living can mean 
luxury, and bay-windows — with the 
addition of the New Dorms there is now 
something for every taste. 

Gothic architecture, grassy 
expanses, state-of-the-art athletic facilities; 
here at B.C. the traditional meets the 
contemporary to create a campus with a 
warm and inimitable personality. 

-Nora Francescani '95 



72 Campus 





Campus 73 



Below: School is in session. The sneaker tree is 
in full bloom. 



Bottom Left: The lawn in front of Bapst Library 
often serves as a comfortable mattress for students 
who want to nap under the sun. 




74 Campus 




Campus 75 




Pride Runs Deep 



"Eagles on the warpath, ooh! aah! 
Eagles on the warpath ..." 

The roar of the crowd, a friendly 
face, pride and accomplishment; any one 
of these scenes or descriptions flash into 
one's head when describing Eagle spirit. 
One may recognize spirit in the chanting 
of a familiar cheer that brings a rush of 
memories to alumni and upperclassmen, 
or in the excited faces of Freshmen and 
new students, anticipating their first 
football game. 

Perhaps the sight of students 
proudly wearing their school ' s colors may 
represent the underlying but ever present 
spirit students possess. Regardless of the 
opinion one has on the topic, the fact 
remains that BC is a university that has 
school spirit — and plenty of it. 

Many students feel that they would 
be missing out on the "typical college 
experience" if they attended a school 
without any unifying sense of comraderie 
and pride. But can the true spirit of a 
school and a student body be concretely 
characterized, or must it also be 
experienced, and perhaps strongly 
displayed in a few circumstances? Groups 
of students camping out in hopes of buying 
MiddleMarch tickets, signs hanging in the 
windows of dorms, the sight of an 
enthusiastic tour guide. The playful antics 
of the mascot; we don't have to make the 
effort to look — BC's spirit is all around 
us. 

-RimaNasrallah'98 



76 Spirit 





Spirit 77 




From Start. . .To Finish 




The leaves had just performed their 
annual magic. The breeze was crisp, and 
early morning sunshine slowly slipped 
away as clouds condensed just enough to 
hint at rain. Heavy skies lingered until late 
afternoon before releasing a damp steady 
drizzle. Another typical autumn day in 
New England, unless one had spent Sunday 
October 23, 1994 along the banks of the 
Charles River. The weather may have been 
ordinary but the 30th annual Head of The 
Charles Regatta was anything but. 

The grayness above created a silent, 
peaceful tranquility seen through the 
graceful movements of the individual 
rower who slid by. However, the scenery 
was splashed with color by vibrant autumn 
leaves and bright school colors that swiftly 
raced ahead towards the finish line. Those 
looking on gathered on footbridges and 
banks and cheered on their favorite teams 
that were represented by various clubs and 
universities throughout the nation. The 
excitement and motivation of crew 
members permeated into the surrounding 
crowds, who felt the strength and teamwork 
of an 8-man boat as it rowed with forceful 
rhythm. 

One could not help but be charmed 
by the traditional feel of Cambridge, the 
freshness of autumn, the gracefulness of a 
classic sport, and the feel of enthusiastic 
crowds. These things combined have 
welcomed crew teams, students, and 
spectators alike back to the banks and the 
water of the Charles River year after year. 



-Tracy Hofmann '95 



78 Head of The Charles 





Top Left: A single rower glides by with swiftness Top Right: Warming up, the BC men's crew team 

and ease, slicing the glistening water with each prepares for the race ahead. 

stroke. 

Above: Many colorful boats can be seen stacked 
Left: Onlookers crowd the bridge to support and along the banks, awaiting the upcoming challenge, 
cheer for their favorite team. 



Head of The Charles 79 



Home Game Ritual 



"GOOD GOD IN HEAVEN, DO 
YOU HAVE ANY IDEA WHAT TIME 
IT IS ! ?" shrieks your roommate, snapping 
open your impenetrable BC-issued drapes 
and muttering something about thinking 
you know someone after living together 
for four years. As early morning sunshine 
filters in the window, you stare accusingly 
at the alarm clock which never in its whole 
warranted life has been set before 1 1:00 
A.M. on a weekday. Offering up a dull 
buzz, the clock strikes 7:59 A.M. You 
grab a hat, a bagel, a fleece jacket, and the 
breakfast beverage of your choice, and 
head down to the Mods. It's a football 
Saturday, and BC students are out in 
droves, surprising skeptics with the 
common mastery of their early-rising 
skills. 

But we students were not alone. 
Reminiscent alumni, courageous parents, 
and enthusiastic siblings traveled remote 
distances to see if EC's now mythic party 
stature was fact or fairy tale. Weren't 
those shabby Mods really torn down a few 
years back? Isn't BC a dry campus? And 
aren't the Eagles a little unrealistic to 
believe that they could beat their arch- 
rivals, the pugnacious Irishmen? 

The truth, in each of these cases, 
was sought and gloriously discovered as a 
vibrant autumn fell on Chestnut Hill. 
Though we can't promise that they'll still 
stand post-Senior Week, for now the Mods 
remain intact and are still the central source 
of.. .social activity. As for a dry campus, 
during the height of tailgating season, the 
only thing more saturated than BC is the 
reservoir. And about those pesky Paddies 
from South Bend; well, evidently once 
was not enough — we'll see you next 
year, Lou. 

-Nora Francescani '95 



80 Tailgating 





Erika Dimmler 

Beautiful SaturSy mornings are 
meant to be jspent tailgating \^tli family and 
friends. 




Top Far Left: Friends, Food, Football and Fun 

are the makings of a successful tailgate. Above: Aa^h! Breakfast. 



= Left: Tailgating - a sport among sports, as seen by 
■= this group of seniors who seem to have mastered 
I the game. 

o 
O 




Tailgating 81 



Steppin' Out With Style 



Though Homecoming Weekend 
arrived sHghtly earlier this year than in the 
recent past, it was welcomed with no less 
anticipation and excitement by students, 
faculty, and alumni. Playing host to John 
Williams, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and 
the Virginia Tech football team, BC rose to 
the occasion with characteristic enthusiasm, 
and fighting spirit. The baton was Ufted 
at 8:00 P.M. to a packed Conte Forum as 
Williams and the world-famous Pops gave 
us a show we will not soon forget. Our own 
"For Boston" crowned the evening, as 
hundreds of balloons fell from the rafters to 
the thunderous applause of an audience that 
was already on its feet. 

Despite the tough loss to Virginia 
Tech, the mood on campus was anything but 
heavy. As evening fell, camera flashes 
popped and sparkled like lightning bugs 
everywhere on and off campus as groups 
gathered for cocktails. Seeing classmates in 
formal attire did tend to have a sobering 
effect on people, but after the initial shock, 
dehght set in as partygoers celebrated with 
old roommates and new friends. 

At the Sheraton Hotel in downtown 
Boston, ice sculptures, well-stocked buffets, 
and several bars were placed throughout the 
giant ballroom. The dance floor was packed 
from the beginning of the night until its end, 
as were the tables where people came together 
to eat, drink, and gossip. By the end of the 
evening, heels were kicked aside, ties were 
loosened, and the dance floor came alive. A 
little tired, maybe, but not ready to let this 
unforgettable weekend end a moment too 
soon, everyone headed back to the Heights 
to toast the dawn with champagne and friends. 

-Nora Francescani '95 



82 Homecoming 




Right: The dance floor remained crowded, as 
the DJ cranked out tunes that kept couples on 
their feet all ni^ht long. 



Below: Before venturing downtown to the 
dance, friends gather for cocktails where the 
craziness begins. 




Left: Two students, taking a short break, spy on 
a photographer through one of the many ice 
sculptures. 



Above: If only my friends could see me now - a 
lucky guy finds himself with not just one beautiful 
date but three! 



Homecoming 83 




ching for the Spirit 



Everyone has their own way of 
getting involved in the BC community. 
Whether as a member of UGBC, an athlete, 
a member of the Ignacio Volunteers, or a 
student in the School of Nursing, there is 
no way to ignore the spiritual element that 
exists here at Boston College. Although 
there is a large Catholic population, other 
denominations exist as well, and through 
a vast array of masses and spiritual 
programs they can all be accommodated. 

Services, such as the Mass of The 
Holy Spirit and the traditional opening 
mass on the Bapst lawn, are just two of the 
special masses that take place each year. 
There are also more intimate masses such 
as the one held at Manresa House on 
Wednesday nights. Masses are aimed at 
the students and the problems and issues 
which face them. Most of the services 
include a great deal of student participation 
as Eucharist ministers, lectors, and singers 
in the music ministry. Outside of the 
traditional mass setting lies a number of 
programs offered through the Chaplaincy 
which extend to the immediate community 
and beyond. 

The chaplaincy supports many 
volunteer programs such as Appalachia, 
The Ignacio Volunteers program to 
Mexico, Belize, and Jamaica, Urban 
Immersion, 4 Boston, and many other 
programs. These programs help students 
to help others while forming close 
communities with their peers. Similarly, a 
variety of retreats are open to students 
who are interested in exploring their 
spirituality and personal values as well as 
options for seniors after graduation. 

In one word this is what BC 
spirituality is all about - community. 

-Kristen D'Amato '95 




Top Left: As the year begins, the BC community Above: Celebration of the Jesuit tradition 
gathers on the steps ofO'Neill Plaza to participate continues with the annual Mass of the Holy 
in the Mass of the Holy Spirit. Spirit on O'Neill Plaza. 



84 Spiritual Life 




iritual Life 85 



Parents Weekend 



Below: Keeping it in the famly — a very special 
parents weekend is shared by this alumni mom 
and her senior son. 

Botton: "No, no, honey, it's on us." Family 
bonding and Boston's finest dining - the perfect 
combination! 



One of the highlights of the fall semester 
was the annual arrival of the infamous 
Parents Weekend. For Freshman, this 
weekend can feel as if it will never arrive 
fast enough, yet before long the leaves 
changed colors and parents were passing 
through the campus gates to spend an 
event filled weekend with their sons and 
daughters. 

Some students spent the weekend with 
their parents and families exploring the 
exciting city of Boston, while others spent 
Saturday tailgating and attending the 
football game. Many students enjoyed 
dinner out at local restaurants where 
parents footed the bill. On the other hand, 
parents had an opportunity to attend classes 
and get a glimpse of student life at B.C. 
Whether students and parents enjoyed 
activities on campus or beyond, these few 
days spent together provided memories 
and good times enjoyed by all. 

-Tracy Hofmann '95 




Courtesy of Tom Jennings 




Courtesy of Tara Murphy 



86 Parents Weekend 




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Stephen J. Antonik 

Above: Judging from our parents' 
smiling faces, spirited conversations, 
and ever-willingness to party all seem 
to be inherited traits. 

Left: While tailgating, roomates get 
the opportunity to mingle with their 
friends' parents. 



Stephen J. Antonik 



Parents Weekend 87 



Haunting The Heights 



Halloween hit the Heights with 
exuberance and excitement this year. 
Students were overcome by ghoulish fever 
early in the fall season. Pumpkins, 
skeletons, and ghosts appeared in many 
dorm windows and decorated doors all 
over campus, making October, from 
beginning to end, a festive and spirited 
month. 

Because Halloween fell on a 
Monday, students made use of the weekend 
and found themselves partying and 
donning their costumes on more than one 
occasion. Relatively comfortable autumn 
weather made it easy to travel from party 
to party. Festivities took place throughout 
campus as well as beyond the BC gates, 
where students received a chance to show 
off their creativity in unique disguises. 

Some students collaborated 
together to represent a specific theme or 
characters from a movie or show, such as 
the Smurfs and the Brady Bunch. The 
entire cast of the Wizard of Oz were 
spotted, as well as the slick Pink Ladies 
from Grease. Other individuals 
transformed themselves into inanimate 
objects like a bag of popcorn and M&M' s. 
Of course there were the traditional scary 
goblins and witches prowling the campus. 
Needless to say students celebrated 
Halloween with true spirit and devilishly 
partied the weekend away. 



-Tracy Hofmann '95 




Courtesy ol" Nora Franccscani 



Top: These creepy fellows, with their deathly Bottom: When friends are bugs they can never 
complexion and piercing stares, were the fright of be a pest, 
party goers. 



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Courtesy of Nora Francescani 



Top: Little Red Riding Hood and her friendly nun 
let loose and enjoy the Halloween festivities 
together. 



Above: A variety of unique and unusual disguises 
could be seen at any costume party during this last 
spirited weekend in October. 



Left: The french maid finds Frankenstein's face 
c frighteningly funny. 



Halloween 89 



A Higher Education 



We begin with half of our class on 
either Newton or Upper, and before long an 
allegiance to that home is bom that no fixed 
amount or debate, argument, or fiiendship can 
diminish. ("You had the buses." "We had 
Stuart." 'Touche.") For a select few, illegal 
practices land them in the bars of their choice 
fiatemizing with members of theirelder classes. 
The content majority stays at home, learning 
each other's darkest secrets during rounds of I 
Never, and practicing their quarters pitches for 
the far-away days when they can actually fit a 
table into their room. 

Sophomores happily find that one 
fiiend means five to seven new ones as they 
move into more sizable living spaces. The of 
age question still a stumbling block, this is the 
year when most drinking game skills are usu- 
ally honed. Common rooms finally afford 
Sophomores space to dance, eat, talk and party 
together, with room left over for funneling and 
beer pong. 

Junior year can spell financial woes for 
new and inexperienced twenty-one year olds. 
Zealous drinkers flock to the bars to show their 
favorite bouncers what their real DMV picture 
looks like, but before long, off-campus parties 
become the method ofchoice for those looking 
to save a few of the dollars. By the time this year 
is over, togas have been donned, black lights 
have been turned on, and the junior class is 
overflowing with seasoned and stylish partyers. 

Seniors do not dabble. This is not a 
class, or a game, but a way of life to be sustained 
seven days a week for the duration of their final 
year atBC. In short, they take theirpartying very 
seriously. Quaint parlor games give way to 
triple shot ice slaloms. PGA pros, golf club in 
one hand, beer in the other, putt their way 
through the intricate Mod course. They have 
arrived. And not a single senior will leave EC 
without having earned the finest partying edu- 
cation, and the finest education period, this side 
of the Pacific. 

-Nora Francescani '95 




Courtesy of Nora Francescani 

Above: After a long week, friends gather to blow 
of steam and bond over a few brewskies. 



90 Partying 



Below: MaryAnn's is a close and convenient 
getaway for seniors when the pressure of senior 
life gets too stressful. 



Right: Apartments off campus are the sight of 
many parties, where students can entertain without 
RA supervision. 




Partying 91 



(■(Hirlcsv nf Barbara Reslaino 



A Winter Wonderland 



Even with the stresses of exams and 
term papers, Christmas spirit flourishes on 
the BC campus. From decorating your dorm 
room, to the annual Christmas tree lighting 
on O'Neill Plaza, there is no denying that if 
you need a study break, there are plenty to be 
found this time of year. 

Some of the highlights of this 
Christmas season were the numerous 
concerts that took place around campus. 
The Chorale performed a breathtaking 
performance on Newton Campus. Another 
show stopping performance was BC Bop's 
cafe show, which had people dancing in 
their seats as always. The Bostonians, The 
Heightsmen, The Acoustics, and The Sharps 
came together for a night of Acapella fun to 
bring in the holiday season, and if all this 
wasn't enough, there were many other ways 
to celebrate as well. 

Some students found dancing on 
their own more exciting and attended the 
numerous holiday semi formals thrown for 
each class. These dances took place at 
different hotels in the city, and were a great 
way of celebrating the festive season. 

With the Christmas season come 
thoughts of giving, and this too was not 
ignored on the campus this year. With 
numerous hat and mitten drives, and the 
collection of food baskets for needy families, 
students did their best to help out. 

Perhaps the best of all, was to look 
out your dorm room window at the beautiful 
Christmas Tree in front of O'Neill and 
daydream about the commencement of all 
those exams and papers that never seemed to 
end. 

-Kristen D'Amato '95 




Above: EC's personal herald of the season: the 
O'Neill Plaza tree. 



92 Christmas 



Left: Hot chocolate, a few carols, 
good friends-what more could you ask 
for? Snow, of course! 

Bottom Left: "Alright, so I don't 
remember the words. It's nothing to 
be ashamed of." 

Bottom Right: The Bostonians 
spread cheer and get everyone 
psyched to join in the caroling. 




93 Christmas 



Dining Delicacies 



Choice. This word separates hu- 
mans from animals; however, a hungry 
student closely resembles a wild beast, so 
BC gives students many options when it 
comes to this area. 

Some students opt for McElroy 
dining hall, usually developing a love/ 
hate relationship with the choices within 
the white picket fence. At lunch time, the 
Eagle's Nest is the place to be. Many 
students meet friends here for a quick 
sandwich between classes. Still, some 
students prefer fast food style service with 
a smile at the Rat in the basement of 
Lyons. Students in need of a study break 
or a late night snack mysteriously find 
themselves at the Club on Upper Campus. 

The new dining facility on lower 
campus is where students' choices really 
come into play. Appropriately nicknamed, 
"The Lodge," for its ski lodge-like appear- 
ance, students wait on seemingly endless 
lines, skillfully balancing their tray with 
one hand, and searching for their meal 
card with the other. Famished students 
anticipate devouring their chicken and 
mashed potatoes or perhaps taking a walk 
on the greasy side with a steak and cheese 
sandwich. Still, there is the choice of an 
Italian feast upstairs at Addie's. 

No matter how many new meth- 
ods of consumption there are, one tradi- 
tion will always stand true — the social 
aspect of mealtime. No matter how sick of 
cafeteria food students get, they will al- 
ways look forward to talking about the 
day's events with their friends at dinner. 
-Barbara Restaino '97 




Top: As exams approach, the line for Dunkin 
Donuts grows due to the caffeine fix needed by 
students. 



Tracy Hofmann 

Bottom: The dining hall on Lower Campus 
offers a wide variety of foods that will appease 
any appetite. 



94 Campus Food 




Campus Food 95 



On The Run 



Ahh. There'snothinglikethesmellof 
sweat and chlorine. Students familiar with the 
Plex might agree, and some might think this is 
insane. Some think that the rhythmic sound of 
the Stairmaster is calming, while others say it 
drives them mad. Some students are driven 
insane by the squeak of sneakers, yet it makes 
others feel at home. 

Whatever the motivation, the Plex is 
usually packed with students fighting those 15 
pounds thatarenotpartialtoFreshman.Whether 
students find it exhilarating or a sacrifice, they 
head off to war against those steak and cheese 
sandwiches from the new dining hall. 

The Plex has something for everyone, 
whether you are a skillful athlete, or just dying 
to lose a few pounds before Spiing Break. 
Some prefer to play a game such as volleyball, 
basketball, orracquetball. Others like to swim 
a few laps in the pool or run a few laps around 
the track. For the student dedicated to a total 
physical workout, there are a variety of Nauti- 
lus machines to buUd muscle tone. However, 
the row of exercise bikes and the wall of 
Stairmasters seems to be the most popular 
aspect of the Plex. Regardless of whether a 
student favors an aerobics class or a fiiendly 
game of basketball, the Plex has an abundance 
of choices for the interested student. 

Although it sometimes takes pictures 
of supermodels plastered all over the refrigera- 
tor, or the persuasion of a friend with the 
promise of a pizza afterwards, most students 
feel refreshed after an hour of working out. 
Some say it relieves stress, and others feel more 
confident about themselves. Most students feel 
that a trip to the Plex is worth taking the time out 
of a busy schedule. StiU others hold tme to their 
theory that stepping a foot into the Plex will lead 
to insanity. 

-Barbara Restaino 



96 Fitness 




Tracy Hofmann 



Far Left: These cage dwellers not only guard 
the equipment, but also greet people with a smile. 

Left: With adrenaline pumping and music blar- 
ing, this student tones muscles while working 
out. 




Tracy Hofmann 



Left: One way to get a good work out is to row 
away those unwanted pounds. 



Fitness 97 



The First Chapter 



Whether one's freshman year is 
spent on Upper Campus or Newton, first 
year students share the excitement and 
challenges that accompany one of the 
biggest steps a person makes in life. The 
transition from home to college is not 
always the easiest but it does bring many 
new, and memorable experiences. These 
experiences are shared among all fresh- 
man since everyone must adjust to the 
same environment. 

Although students must leave 
their friends from home, they learn to 
venture out and make new friends. With 
these new friends, they discover to- 
gether that McElroy is not Mom's cook- 
ing and laundry does not clean itself. 
Privacy is a thing of the past, not only 
does one have to share a room the size of 
a shoebox with a roommate, but also use 
community showers and bathrooms. On 
the other hand, freedom is a thing of the 
future, without parents looking over 
one's shoulder students get a real feel 
for freedom which makes every new 
experience that much more unique. The 
first year of college provides the oppor- 
tunity to get involved in clubs, make 
new friends, and be challenged academi- 
cally, while at the same time overcom- 
ing everyday struggles that are part of 
freshman life. 

It can be said however, that when 
the year has come to an end, freshmen 
have not only grown used to college life 
but also have developed close friend- 
ships that will last many years and memo- 
ries that will last a lifetime. 



-Tracy Hofmann '95 




98 Freshman Life 




MarilcrScgiiia 



Below: Putting their heads together, these 
freshman have decided that freshman year is a 
blast. 

Bottom Right: Part of freshman life is the 
opportunity to decorate your room, expressing 
your own personality. 





\LinlLT Sc2un 




Marifer Segura 

Above: We walk alike, we talk alike - there's 
nothing like finding out that you and your room- 
mate are twins that were separated at birth. 

Left: Relaxing with the girls: the benefits of girls 
dorm rooms over guys- they're cleaner, they smell 
better, and the only things that grow there are 
plants. 



Freshman Life 99 



A Step Up 



Below: Although laundry is often neglected, there 
comes a time when the bag is full. 

Right: Sophomores found that a good water fight 
is the best way to relieve stress. 



Long ago, in a cubicle they called 
a dorm room far far away, the Class of '97 
dreamed of becoming inhabitants of Lower 
Campus. The lucky ones, with good lot- 
tery numbers lived "uptown" in the new 
dorms, while not so lucky students lived 
"downtown" in Walsh. The most unlucky 
souls, however, ended up on College Road. 

Sophomores found out what a pain 
it was to get into the right classes to com- 
plete their core requirements. They dis- 
covered what professors were good, how 
to clean a toilet, and what dish washing 
liquid cleans grease while softening hands 
at the same time. The sophomores got a 
taste of the choices available at the new 
dining hall, and they cursed the new stairs, 
but blessed the parking garage elevator. 
Sophomores found out who their true 
friends were, dealt with the frustration of 
finding an apartment off campus for Jun- 
ior year, and discussed the option of going 
abroad. 

Burdened by a tougher work load, 
more responsibilities, the tension of choos- 
ing a major, and the real world a little bit 
closer, the sophomore class looked for- 
ward to the weekend and relieved their 
stress by partying. Walsh Hall was a zoo, 
and it proved to be the party dorm as 
students discovered how many more 
people they could fit in their room this 
year. The Class of '97 lived up to their 
reputation. 

-Barbara Restaino '97 






/ 



; / / / 




/ / / 





Tracv Hofmann 




100 Sophomore Life 





Laura Spear 

Left: The eighth floor lounge is a great place to 
escape the distractions of one's room, in order to 
peacefully study. 

Far Left: The busy academic day leaves little 
time for housekeeping. 



Tracy Hofmann 



Sophomore Life 101 



Real World Visited 



Junior year is one of transition 
and responsibility. As September 1st ap- 
proaches some students must be prepared 
to pay the rent, cook for themselves and 
deal with landlords. Whether you live on 
Commonwealth, South Street, or 
Cummings, you learn to cope with loud 
neighbors, transportation to and from 
school, and broken toilets that takes your 
landlord four months to fix. 

However, the benefits include the 
freedom to have parties free of RA inter- 
vention and most often your neighbors 
end up becoming some of your best 
friends. These new found friends are ea- 
ger to help you celebrate that long antici- 
pated 21st birthday. Overall, living off 
campus can be an experience that not 
only offers freedom but also teaches re- 
sponsibility and can be an enjoyable part 
of the journey through college. 

On the other hand, juniors living 
on campus often find their rooms being 
invaded by friends who live beyond the 
BC campus. When the snow begins to fall 
and the wind starts gustling you can bet 
that the convenience of dorm life is the 
envy of every junior waiting at the bus 
stop. 

- Tracy Hofmann '95 




Above: The best part of junior year is visiting and 
socializing with friends in their new apartments. 



Tracy Hofmann 

Below: The 1600's of Commonwealth Ave. 
are popular spots for off-campus living and 
often frequented on Saturday nights. 



102 Junior Life 



Left: When Macaroni and Cheese is a must, or when the keg 
is kicked, don't fear Chansky's is here. 




The Final Chapter 



Senior year. Last football games. Last 
registration dates. Last dances. The "L" word 
has a tendency to dominate senior sentences. 
Though it seems harmless enough, "lastness" 
can get out of hand as pensive seniors meander 
across campus remarking that this is the last 
Tuesday in December that they wUl eat tuna on 
a bulkie in the Nest at 2: 15. 

Another senior affliction is known as 
the Real World Panic Syndrome. SOM stu- 
dents msh to FUene's to buUd the perfect inter- 
view suit as theii" terrified A&S roommates 
look up ' 'cover letter' ' in the dictionary. Nursing 
students discover that after all this time, the sight 
of blood doesn't do good things for them, and 
SOE student teachers gaze longingly at the 
Wall Street Journal, circling their favorite stocks 
in red pen and crayon. Suddenly, whatever you 
were doing for the past four years seems like the 
worst possible choice, and you feel like your 
resume cries for the insertion of some really 
creative Ues. 

Though all seniors are stmck at some 
point with these curious maladies, the duration 
of the illness is usually pretty brief Dwelling on 
"lasts" gives way to hysterical memories of 
firsts: freshman dorms and roommates, first 
venturestonow-favoritebars,firstSpringBreaks 
with friends, first meetings with Dean 
Ryan...well, you get the idea. The Real World, 
though it becomes no less real or scary, takes on 
an exciting quality. As volunteers learn where 
they will be located next year, other lucky 
students get job offers and prospective earning 
rates; as fiiends chart cross-country and cross- 
continent road trips, other students receive word 
from grad schools that they will be on the career 
track come September. We start to see that we 
are on the brink of the opening up of our whole 
lives, and we are as ready as we will ever be. 

-Nora Francescani 




Courlcsy of Liz Landr>' 



104 Senior Life 



Top Left: Smiling seniors getting used to the 
idea of legal parties: it's tough, but they seem to 
be adjusting pretty well. 

Bottom Left: Nowhere is BC football spirit 
more enthusiastically displayed than in the 
Mods, where the rallying starts at dawn. 






Above: Many an afternoon and 
evening has been spent unwinding at 
Cleveland Circle's "nice" bar, 
Cityside, before die hards move on to 
the legendary dive across the street. 

Left: The boys spend a quiet evening 
at home: who says you need a sheet of 
polka-dotted plastic to play a memo- 
rable game of twister? 



CoLirlcsv or BrNiii ll.irdii 



Senior Life 105 



O'Neill Computer Facility 



More than once it has been every 
students savior and biggest nightmare. 
For all those not lucky enough to own a 
computer, the OCF is a need as basic as 
air. Papers can be typed, printed and 
whisked off just in time to make a deadline. 
Students may find themselves seated in a 
cubicle to register for classes, find a 
professor's assignment, or work on a 
project. With a new E-mail service, the 
OCF finds itself busier than ever. Of 
course every student knows that when 
exam time rolls around it is time to put on 
the running shoes to beat the crowd. 
Sometimes the wait can be as long as 
several hours. Nonetheless, the computer 
facility is a necessity and utilized by many 
students. 

-Tracy Hofmann '95 




Jiiscpli B. Plurad 




Joseph B Plurad 



Top: Within each cubicle, students master the art 
of written expression and hone their computer 
usage skills. 



Above: The E-mail service has become very 
popular, as it allows students to communicate with 
friends or family without having to pay any bills! 



Bottom Right: By tuning out the other typists 
in the room, this student is able to concentrate 
on the project at hand. 



106 O'Neill Computer Facility 



Below: Relaxing with friends and playing 
cards is a great way to wind down after a long 
day of classes. 



Taking A Break 




Free time. There never seems to be 
quite enough, but taking time out to do 
nothing in particular is an essential aspect 
of student life that should not be overlooked 
or underated. Many none academic hours 
are spent watching TV, reading magazines, 
or just goofing around with the roommates. 
Sega wars are known to spontaneously 
develop that put the meaning of 
competitiveness to the test, and marathon 
movie viewing is a favorite when students 
choose the expanded study break. In the 
end, whether the break be short or long, 
students know how to make the best of it. 
-Tracy Hofmann '95 



Nicole Griffilhs 




Above: A five minute Sega game can easily Right: Every student knows that in order to stay 
lead to five hours of procrastination. sane, frequent study breaks are necessary. 



Free Time 107 



Getting Involved 



Although academics is an essential part 
of the educational process in college, a 
student's knowledge can be richly 
enhanced from the experiences not 
connected with books and lectures. A 
major aspect of learning and personal 
growth is found in the many extracurricular 
activities that are so abundant and diverse 
on the B.C. campus. 

The various clubs, ranging anywhere 
from sports to political groups, were able 
to present themselves to new and old 
students early in the year on Student 
Activities Day. Here many students took 
the opportunity to ask questions and 
explore their interests. Most students chose 
to participate in the variety of clubs that 
allowed them to make new friends, express 
ideas, and learn important skills. 

Whether students are part of a service, 
cultural, or any other organization, 
involvement in clubs allows students to 
follow in the Jesuit tradition which stresses 
community, education, and friendship. 

-Tiacy Hofmann '95 




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Top Right: Activities day offers students the best 
opportunity to discover their interests and join 
clubs. 

Bottom Right: Acting in The Lonely Planet 
allowed these two students the best opportunity to 
share their talent. 




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108 Participation 



Below: During AHANA family weekend, these 

students participated in the annual AHANA 

fashion show. 

Bottom: Beingpartofacluboftenmeanslogging Right: Playing the sax in B.C. bop is one way to 

lona hours at the office. 2et involved and entertain others. 




Above: Students volunteer their time at the 
Undergraduate Admissions Office to help recruit 
future B.C. members. 



Participation 109 



special Events 



Below: BC alumni Peter Lynch listens carefully 
to financial discussions concerning financial 
markets and the economy. 

Right: The lead singer of Toad House inspired 
the small but enthusiastic crowd during one of 
the pub series concerts in the Rat. 



Students at Boston College are often 
overwhelmed by activities and events on 
and off campus. Even though there is a 
variety of activities in Boston, there have 
been many guests and concerts who have 
kept students on campus as opposed to 
venturing into Boston on the infamous T. 

The Economic Conference was held in 
Robsham Theatre with a simulcast in Conte 
Forum. Business students flooded both 
facilities to listen to business concerns. 
This Conference aided economists and 
interested students in determining where 
our financial future lies. Along with 
academic activities, "Toad House" and 
several other groups belted out a few tunes 
at the Rat, while interested, and spirited 
crowds looked on. Events sponsored by 
UGBC and the Pub Series offered students 
the alternative to stay on campus at night, 
while also getting the chance to hear 
talented bands and speakers. 

Between conferences, concerts, and 
other events on campus, it is amazing that 
B.C. students are able to balance both on 
and off campus activities — but they always 
seem to manage! 

-Laura Spear '97 



Right: Lisle Baker was one speaker who attended 
the B.C. conference on the economy to speak 
about the US economic future. 




1 10 Special Events 



Below: The Cape Verdean Student Association sponsored a meeting 
with the Prime Minister of Cape Verde. He came to address students 
on issues concerning his country. 




Special Events 111 



Beyond The Gates 



For the average student, the memorable 
experiences that make up college life are 
not limited to those right here on campus. 
Opportunities abound when the student 
ventures beyond the B.C. gates to explore 
Boston and all it has to offer. With its 
intriguing history, but young feel, Boston 
creates an interesting atmosphere that all 
can enjoy. As the "T" stretches and crawls 
through the heart of Boston and its suburbs, 
students are brought anywhere they desire. 

During the week, some students travel 
into Boston to gain immeasurable 
knowledge working. Whether one is 
getting paid or volunteering, jobs offer 
students a chance to get hands on 
experience in the work force. Besides 
being a working environment, the city can 
also be an escape. Whether one needs a 
break from school work, needs a bite to 
eat, or just wants to experience something 
new, the world just past More Hall has 
much to offer. 

When the shopping urge takes over, 
students head for Newbury Street, Faneuil 
Hall and Copley Plaza to find their favorite 
fashions. The nightlife is also a main 
attraction. With so many different clubs 
and bars, students can never run out of 
places to hang out, dance, and party with 
their friends. The abundant number of 
restaurants entices students to abandon 
their meal cards and satisfy their appetites 
with more appealing fare found in 
downtown dining. 

Whether one is heading for Cleveland 
Circle or Harvard Square, the experiences 
that lie just beyond the Heights are always 
exciting and rewarding. 

-Tracy Hofmann '95 




Courtesy of Tracy Hofmann 



112 Beyond The Gates 



Top: Although situated in a busy district, Copley 
Square remains tranquil and is a refreshing breather 
from the busy city. 



Bottom : The easy accesibility of the "T" makes 
it possible for students to explore Boston. 



Below: The skyline is forever changing in Boston as 
buildings rise and businesses expand. 












»•»%* 







Top: When winter arrives, there is a steady 
dtort to clear the sidewalks and the streets to 
ensure that Boston's city life goes on. 



Bottom: The newstand is one of the most famous 
recognizable landmarks of Harvard Square. 



Beyond The Gates 113 



Left: Students in search of popular local bands 
can be entertained at the Middle East in the heart 
of Central Square. 

Below: Working in a Boston Laboratory, this 
student gets valuable experience not found in the 
classroom. 




114 Beyond The Gates 



Below: When the weekend hits, students trek off 
:ampus to their favorite bar to sociahze with 

Tiends. 




Jay Reblantio 



Beyond The Gates 115 




Bottom: Harvard Square is a melting pot for creative 
and unique talent performed and enjoyed by all ages. 

Right: Unicycling is one of the many crowd 
pleasing performances found at Faneuil Hall. 



16 Beyond The Gates 



Below: The Old North Church is an inspiring 
reminder of Boston's patriotic history. 




Top Right: BayBank can be found on almost every corner in Boston, 
making it the bank of choice for many students who depend on its 
convenience. 

Bottom Right: Whether shopping or dining is the goal, Faneuil Hall 
offers an array of opportunities along its cobblestone walkways. 



Beyond The Gates 1 17 




118 # Shining Through 



ACTIV 




Getting Together 



At Boston College, life experiences and friends are 
formed not just in the classroom or in the residence 
halls. They are also developed in the many clubs and 
organizations found on campus. From AH ANA to 'ZBC, 
there are a myriad of clubs that foster growth, build 
friendships and serve others. Activities at Boston College 
provide a special opportunity for students to develop a sense 
of pride in our school and in ourselves by encouraging 
growth in participation and leadership. In our groups we 
share with others our interests, our passions, our talents and 
our ideas. With this process of learning, assuming 
responsibilities and interacting with each other, we create 
something larger than ourselves — the building of 
community. Although these clubs, groups and organizations 
are very diverse, together they form the nucleus of our 
Boston College community, and are another vehicle through 
which we shine through. 

Alisa Gatti and Alison Logrip 
Co-Editors 



Activities i^ 119 



Right: A weekly Senate meeting 
covering all the issues of BC life. 

Below: Joe Raconelli, Pub Series 
Coordinator, and Matt Carley enjoy 
the Toad concert. 

Bottom Right: President William 
Dorcena and Vice-President Cecelia 
Gutierrez led UGBC in the 1994-95 
school year. 






Campus Commitment 

UGBC and CGC Emphasize Class Unity 



Pclcr M:inis 

Above: John Mancini, UGBC Senate 
President, preparing the agenda for 
the next Senate meeting. 



120 Activities 



The 1994 - 1995 
Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College (UGBC) was 
based on the "B uilding Bridges' ' 
platform. President Will 
Dorcena and Vice-President 
Cecilia Guiterrez made a sincere 
effort to make UGBC accessible 
and representative of aU students 
through the assistance of the 
UGBC newsletter "UGBC 
News and Views". UGBC put 
on their traditional events like 
the Homecoming Dance, two 
big concerts each semester, town 
meetings, the Pub Series at the 
Rat, and many different 
speakers, including novelist 
Amy Tan in conjunction with 
the Asian Caucus. UGBC also 
made some big changes during 
the year. The Cabinet became 
more diverse this year with half 
the members being from 
AHANA. Cecilia Guiterrez said, 
"after the year's end we wanted 



people to say they learned 
something about other peoples' 
cultures." An AHANA family 
weekend was also added to the 
list of activities to make all 
families, from all cultures, 
comfortable at BC. The Senate 
was kept busy establishing 
programs like the Be Clean 
Program which cleaned the 
neighborhoods around Cleveland 
Circle, passing the $680,000 
budget, electing a board to review 
UGBC programming, 

continuing the P.U.R.E. mugs 
program and the shuttle bus 
service to Logan Airport for the 
holidays. A constitutional 
convention was held on campus 
from January to March that 
involved Senators and student 
leaders in the Senate's goal of 
rewiiting the UGBC constitution. 
The Cabinet and Senate worked 
together to establish a third branch 
— a judiciary boai'd — to UGBC. 



While UGBC focused 
on activities during the school 
year, the Class Government 
Council focused on BC unity 
after graduation. Consisting of 
89 members and four council 
representatives from each class, 
CGC is the undergraduate branch 
of the Alumni Association of 
BC. Not only does CGC promote 
unity in each class with fund- 
raisers to form a treasury and put 
on activities such as dances, CGC 
continues after graduation. 
Officers selected for after 
graduation plan all reunions, 
including classes meeting after 
football games and other events. 
As Senior Liaison contact with 
the Alumni Board, Roshan 
Rajkumar said CGC, "fosters 
leadership, plus it creates a sense 
of belonging to BC" It makes 
one feel that he/she is ' 'more than 
just a student". 

// 





UGBC Vice-Presidents 




UGBC Cabinet 




UGBC Senate 



UGBC/CGC 121 




College Republicans 




Elena Vuvary 



BC Democrats 




Courtesy ol' Dom Aucritano 



Campaign Day 



122 Activities 



Below: The College Republicans 
work hard at Student Activities Day 
recruiting members. 




Political Rivals In Battle 



College Republicans and BC Democrats Duke It Out At the Polls 



Fall of the 1994-95 
school year at BC was a busy 
time for both the College 
Republicans and BC 
Democrats. Both political 
groups campaigned actively 
during the 1994 November 
elections. 

College Republicans, 
headed by Chairman Dom 
Atteritano, worked hard to 
reach out to BC students. Going 
from about 200 members in 
1991-92 to close to 1000 
members by the 1 994-95 school 
year. College Republicans was 
one of the largest organizations 
on campus, and in the nation, 
competing with Texas A&M 
for the most members. 

Besides helping out on 
local and national campaigns 
by attending rallies, helping 
with fund-raisers, and going 



door to door. College 
Republicans strove to provide 
a service to the BC community 
by sending out a newsletter of 
events, happenings and 
accomplishments. There was a 
focus on campus issues, for 
instance, political correctness 
and fairness in representation. 
College Republicans focused 
on what was going on 
politically on campus and off 
and how it will effect BC 
students. Atteritano summed up 
the point of College 
Republicans when he said. 
"Why not be a part in the 
decisions that are going to affect 
you?" 

BC Democrats, has 
approximately 170 members 
including President Justin 
Lannen, and Vice President Joe 
Alden. They heavily assisted 



in the democratic campaigns 
of the fall of 1994. For the 
Kennedy campaign, BC 
Democrats collected signatures 
to have Kennedy's name put 
on the ballot again. They 
brought in the largest number 
of signatures, totalling 1 ,200. 
They also helped on 
Roosevelt's campaign for 
Governor. No on Question 3, 
and Shannon O'Brien's 
campaign. They attended 
conventions, did telephone 
campaigning, and went to 
parades to show candidates 
their support. 

Beyond the fall 
election, BC Democrats had 
speakers such as Michael 
Dukakis on campus. One of 
their long-time goals was to 
"see membership double" as 
Joe Alden said. He continued 



Why not be a part of the 
decisions that are going 
to affect you? 

-Dom Atteritano 

99 

saying, "We want to see 
students involved. It's their 
government. They should have 
information to make choices. 
Plus, we have fun." 

Aside from obvious 
different points of view, 
College Republicans and BC 
Democrats had one thing in 
common. They both worked to 
keep students aware of 
opportunities to become 
involved. 

// 




VOTl \ VOTE I VOTi 



yOTiA VOTE I VOTE 




Courtesy of Dom Auerilano 



Above: President Dom Atteritano 
and Rolando Infante believed in 
increasing the Republican vote. 

Left: Opponents square offatBC for 
the Newton Mayorial Debate. 



Democrats/Republicans 123 



Students In Action 



RHA and Student Judicial Board Helping Other: 



4^ 



...trying to educate and 
not judge others by their 
actions. 

- Roshan Rajkumar 

» 



Below: Board members of RHC. 



Of the many student run 
organizations at BC, a new and 
young organization appeared and 
made a large impact this year. 
The Residence Hall Council, 
founded in 1987, had five 
members and 25 representatives. 
During the 1990-91 year, RHC 
became independent of UGBC, 
joined the National Association 
of Colleges and Universities 
(NACURH) , and became an 
Association, with the Hall 
councils working under RHA.By 
the 1994-95 school year, RHA 
had five executive board 
members - President Maeve 
Naughton. Plus, RHA consists 
of fourteen Hall Councils with 
four officers and hall 
representatives from each floor, 
making the total membership of 
180 students. This student-run 
program provided many non- 
alcoholic activities. New to the 




J..;,L'|ill B. I'luiail 

Right: Honora Hunter, Maeve 
Naughton and Bridget McDonald at 
the RHA table on Student Activities 
Day. 



1994-95 year was the concert 
series in the Cabaret room which 
provided a different band every 
other Friday night from nine to 
eleven. They also put on 
Breaking the Barriers Ball and 
Springfest. Aside from these 
major events, each Hall Council 
sponsored one event each month. 
When asked about RHA, the 
Executive President Maeve 
Naughton said, "RHA is young, 
but grew a lot in the last couple 
years" and is "finally making an 
identity." 

Another student run 
organization is the Student 
Judicial Board. This program, 
part of ODSD, involves students 
in the judiciary process with 
other students. Composed of 
twenty to twenty-five members, 
representing each class, along 
with three chairpersons, the 
Student Judiciary Board 



responded directly to, or t( 
appeals by students, who have 
broken any of the University'; 
policies, including academic 
social, or environmental. The 
Board heard the student 
argument and decided if he/sh« 
was responsible or not. If the 
student was found responsible 
the Board gave out sanctions tc 
the Deans .The purpose of havinj 
a program such as this, not onl\ 
gives the board member; 
experience in working witl; 
policies, but by having a case! 
heard by a group of fello\^' ' 
students, the Board is able t(|| 
relate to the student, and stilj 
uphold the University's policyj 
As Senior Chairperson, Rashor' i 
Rajkumar says the Student 
Judicial Board is a "group oj 
peers trying to educate and no 
judge students fortheir actions.'} i 

// 



124 Activities 




Below: Joanne Po.RA. Maria 
Hamouette, Lisa Dolan, and Margaret 
Enis enjoying the multicultural 
festivities of "Around the World" in 
Voute. 





Student Judicial Board 




Courtesy of the Office of University Housing 

Resident Assistants 




Joseph B. PliiRid 



Residence Hall Association 



RHA/Student Judicial Board 125 




O'Connell House Staff 




Murray House 



126 Activities 




Above: O'Connell House was a 
great place to enjoy a good time 
with great friends. 




Left: Everyone who attended the 
"Breaking the Barriers Ball" let loose 
and danced the night away. 

Below: Will Dorcena and Brian 
McBrearity buried the hatchet at the 
"Breaking the Barriers Ball." 




Homes of Hospitality 



Murray House and O'Connell House 



Murray House, managed 
by Jason Deutsch and Tim 
Frangioso, was one of the student 
run houses, funded by UGBC and 
put together through ODSD. The 
staff also included three work study 
students and volunteers. Many 
events throughoutthe year included 
Spaghetti Dinners on Thursday 
nights, Around the World Night 
with different cultural clubs, and 
North End Night . Besides special 
dinners, Murray House offered an 
alternative to the library with 
computers and study rooms. After 
atough hour of study ing, you could 
go down stairs and relax in front of 
the TV. Murray House also housed 
the offices of some BC clubs — 
Crew, Rugby, the Sharps, LGBC, 
and Right to Life. Although not 
always well known, it was a great 
place with an informal atmosphere 
and little stress. 

Along the same lines as 
^Murray House, O'Connell House 



was run by five students: Bridget 
McDonald, Megan Taylor, ZiHie 
Theodorou,RenalynTe,andKaren 
Pawson. They made available 
many ways for students to get a 
breakfrom studying. Newthisyear 



M- 



.. .fun stuff to do on campus 
and it's cheap. 

- Bridget McDonald 



were social awareness nights, 
where studentshadtheopportunity 
to attend workshops for self defense 
and other social awareness issues. 
These took place on Wednesdays, 
alternating with the Coffee House 
Series sponsored by Starbucks and 



Coffee Connection. Many bands, 
and EC's own comedy groups My 
Mother's Fleabag and 
Hello. ..Shovelhead performed. 
The Coffee House Series invited 
BC students to show off theirtalents 
with open mike nights, poetry 
readings, singers, and art shows. 
Sunday night movies and 
"Breaking the Barriers" were part 
of O'Connell House's list of 
entertainment.McDonaldsaidthat 
O ' Connell House had ' 'fun stuff to 
do on campus and it's cheap". The 
biggesteventthatO'ConnellHouse 
put on was Middlemarch in the 
Spring. It was not only tlie hottest 
event to attend, but the most 
difficult. Students had to figure 
out clues to find where the tickets 
were sold. 

Murray House and 
O ' Connell House provided a sense 
of tradition, a great study 
atmosphere and a place to relax 
after a long day of classes. 

JJ 




Above: Tom Gilmartin took a break 
from spinning on the dance floor and 
enjoyed the refreshments. 



Murray and O'Connell Houses 127 



Right: Being a Heightsmen is never 
a drag! 

Below: BC Sharps harmonize with 
style at the Cafe. 




Thomas S. Rudegeair 





With a Song in Their Hearts 

BC A Cappella Groups Entertain with Their Voice. 



Elena Vizvaty 

Above: Brian Cromwell sings from 
his soul. 



128 Activities 



The vocal aspect of 
music was successfully 
performed by the four a cappella 
groups on campus . These groups 
entertained many BC audiences 
with their talent and energy. 

This year's Bostonians 
of Boston College consisted of 
eight men and seven women. 
The Bostonians was founded in 
1986 and is Boston College's 
oldest a cappella group. They 
are nationally well-known for 
their perfect harmony and 
enthusiastic performances. 
Under the supervision of a new 
advisor, Chet Gladchuck, the 
group underwent some changes . 
They move forward in the 
complexity of their singing and 
began to sing more 
contemporary and popular 
songs. They also performed 



skits as well as the first national 
anthem sung a cappella at the 
Parent's Weekend football game. 
The Bostonians have proudly 
released two studio albums. Their 
first CD, Anthem, was released 
this year. The Bostonians held 
two cafe nights and performed a 
very successful end of the year 
show at O' Council House. 

The BC Sharps is Boston 
College's only female a cappella 
group. Founded in December 
1990, the BC Sharps used their 
unique vocal stylings along with 
their creative stage humor to 
produce outstanding and 
entertaining shows. They have 
successfully strayed from the 
traditional by including Janis 
Joplin ' s "Piece of My Heart" into 
their repertoire. The BC Sharps 
were featured on the front page 



of The Heights and also opened 
for the "Betty" concert. 

The Acoustics, th 
youngest a cappella group oi 
campus, defines themselves as 
theatrical coed a cappeUa group 
Led by President Rebecca Girar( 
and Musical Director Elain 
Digregorio, the Acoustics wer( 
seen performing on campus ai 
the Cafe, O'Connell House 
Songfest at Robsham anc 
BreakingtheBarriersBall. Thej 
raised money for their group bj 
singing at weddings and doin^ 
gigs in Faneuil Hall. This year 
they worked on recording a CD 
Jeremy Nurse stated he likes tht 
Acoustics because "they are 
good group of people whc 
capitalize on having fun no 
fighting for the spotlight." 




Thomas S. Rudcgcair 



Vbove: The BC Sharps moving and 
grooving to the beat! 




The Acoustics 




Thomas S. Rudeseair 



The Sharps 




The Heightsmen 



A Cappella Groups 129 




Chorale Executive Board 






\ ij^^^^y < 



:.J-t± 



Thomas S. Rudegeair 



Voices of Imani 




Thomas S. Rudctieair 



Rehearsal Break 



130 Activities 



Singing With Faith 

Voices of Imani Brings the Word to Others 



Voices of Imani, 
Swahili for "faith", 
incorporated a spirit of family 
and exposed choir members 
and the community to gospel 
music. Under the direction of 
Jonathan Singleton and 
Professor Hubert Walters, 
Voices of Imani combined 
spiritual and contemporary 
music into the repertoire. This 
year, they sang at Parent's 
Weekend, "...And Beautiful 
Ball" and performed at their 
annual concert on December 9. 
In the Spring, Voices tours 
Massachusetts and Connecticut 
for concerts in various churches 



and college campuses. An 
annual concert was held in April 
that was organized in 
conjunction with the Black 
Family Weekend. Voices of 
Imani competed at the Gospel 
Choir Festival in the Spring 
against many Universities, 
including BU, Brandeis, 
Harvard and Wellesley. Two 
favorites could be heard at all 
of their concerts - /' ve Got Joy 
and Give Us This Day. One 
reason why Imani's Vice 
President Joshua Kennedy 
enjoyed participating was 
because he wanted to "bring 
the Word to other people." 

AL 




Music For The Masses 

BC Chorale Melodies Fill the Community with Joy 
The University Chorale lasting impression. The 



ijhas seen another successful 

( season. Singing with the Boston 

^fPops Orchestra and John 

\ Williams at the second "Pops 

'! on the Heights" scholarship 

S gala began a truly amazing year. 

f[ Now underthe direction of John 

1; Finney, the Chorale has grown 

; from a renowned liturgical 

.; choir into one of Boston 

.{ College's finest performance 

1 groups. The recent arrival of 

[ Mr. Finney sparked a new age 

of contemporary works, as well 

' as early contemporary 

masterpieces. The Chorale's 

Fall performance of Carl Orff 's 

Carmina Burana filled Trinity 

, Chapel for two nights, with 

'rousing responses from 

audiences. Powerful and 

energetic, the 160 member 

chorus is certain to leave a 



chorale's annual Christmas 
concert included Daniel 
Pinkham's Christmas Cantata 
and their program of traditional 
carols charmed all those in 
attendance. A finale of 
Handel's Hallelujah Chorus 
from "Messiah" left another 
packed house awe-stricken. 
The Spring Semester began 
preparation for the Chorale's 
annual tour abroad, which, this 
season brought them to Ireland. 
The excursion included three 
cities, Cork, Dublin, and 
Galway. In the past, the Chorale 
has traveled to Rome, Paris, 
Nassau, Puerto Rico, 
performed in AIDS benefit 
concerts, as well as singing to 
an audience which included 
Pope John Paul II. 

DS 




Above: The Chorale women sing 
with concentration. 

Left: Voices of Imani perform their 
Christmas Concert on December 9, 
1994 at St. Ignatius. 




Left: A member of the chorale 
singing at Carmina Burana concert. 

Below: A trio sings with strength in 
Trinity Chapel. 




ChoraleA'^oices of Imani 131 



Right: Drum major Jill Robinson 
keeps the marching band in time and 
sounding great. 





Above: John Bayers, Bonnie Kozel, 
Lynette Gatti, Noah Clark, Jeanie de 
la Cruz, David DeRosa, Bill 
Dougherty, Ayako Eguchi, Sara 
Hathaway and Kari Ritz were among 
the Seniors the band recognized 
during the BC v. Syracuse half-time. 

Right: Dance Team member shows 
off her talent during the /l/firJcf//; show. 



Marching Madness 

Screaming Eagles Marching Band Moves to the Bea 
With a membership of football games in the newly 

expanded Alumni Stadium 
traveling to Pennsylvaniato suppoi 
the Eagles as they successfull; 
battled the Pitt Panthers, marchin| 
in numerous community paradesj 
and getting the student bod] 
pumped up at aU of the B.C. Pej 
Rallies. In order to prepare fo 
these important tasks, all of th( 
band members arrived on campui 
a week early in the fall to attend th<i 
annual band camp- seven days o: 
rigorous, yet rewarding, practice' 
sessions. During this past year, the 
Marching Band welcomed thd 
newest addition to its organization; 
the Golden Eagle Dance Team; 
The visual effects created by these 
women complemented the entire 
ensemble which consisted of the 
instmmentalists, colorguard, drurr 
majors, and managers. 

KF&AI 



131, the Screaming Eagles 
Marching Band definitely had its 
fair share of individual personalities 
and talents. What made this band 
so special, however, was that the 
131 student members were able to 
come together as one, with a single 
common purpose in mind: to 
delight. You've seen them 
gracefully gliding across the 50- 
yard line athalftime. You'veheard 
them playing For Boston at all of 
thepepraUieswithoutevermissing 
a beat. But most importantly, 
you've /e/r the spirit, enthusiasm, 
and overall excitement that these 
members were able to generate 
when they were together. 

This year, as in the past, 
the band's schedule was quite a 
demanding one. It included 
performing at all of the home 




Right: Natalie Go, along with other 
members of the Symphony, brings 
an essence of culture to the BC student 
body. 



132 Activities 



Celebrating the Classics 



Concert Band 

The two musical 
organizations that performed 
many times throughout the year 
to the deUght of the Boston 
College community were the 
Concert Band and the 
Symphony. The Boston College 
Concert Band was composed of 
sixty undergraduate students, 
graduate students, staff, faculty 
and alumni. The Concert Band 
performed a wide variety of 
music from standard concert 
repertoire and marches to 
Broadway, film, and popular 
music. This was Fred Harris' 
first year conducting the Concert 
Band. Along with conducting 
the band as one, he broke it up 
into small ensembles. In concerts, 
the individual groups played 
before the Band played as a unit. 
By being broken up into groups, 
the musicians became more 



and Symphony Harmonize 

aware of the different music that 
they played and were more in 
tune to themselves and the other 
musicians. The musicians felt 
that it was a rewarding 
experience for them to play with 
other musicians of all different 
ages, capabilities, and levels of 
expertise. The Boston College 
Concert Band holds a Christmas 
Concert and a Pops Concert in 
the Spring. The Boston College 
Symphony Orchestra consists of 
all members from the Boston 
College community: 

undergraduates, graduate 
students, staff and spouses. The 
orchestra is under the direction 
of Conductor Steven 
Karidoyanes. This results in four 
outstanding performances, 
including the hosting of a 
Concerto Competition. 

JM 





Screaming Eagles Marching Band 




Concert Band 




Orchestra Bands 133 




BC bOp! 




Musical Guild 




'A Dancer's Christmas" 



134 Activities 



BCbOplstotheBeat 



Musical Guild 
The Musical Guild of 
Boston College was a club that 
promoted the performance and 
appreciation of classical, jazz, 
contemporary, and popular 
music. Membership of the 
Musical Guild was open to all 
members of the Boston College 
community. The Guild 
sponsored the annual inter- 
collegiate A Co/7pe//a Songfest 
and brought to BC famous 
national and local artists. Twice 
this year, the Musical Guild 
hosted "Musicians Among Us" 
in which all members of the 
Boston College community 
were encouraged to participate. 
BC bOp!, a jazz 
ensemble dedicated to the 



and bOp! Popularize Music 
highest levels of instrumental 
and vocal jazz performance, 
performed professional level 
traditional and contemporary 
jazz this year in addition to a. 
variety of popular selections!! 
and vocal jazz. The musicians, 
in BC bOp! had an enormous 
amount of enthusiasm this yeai 
and became more involved, 
inside and outside the campusjl 
They continued their traditiorr 
of travel and performed two 
excellent concerts at BC a^ 
well: the Christmas Cafe and 
the Spring Concert in Robsham. 
This year's BC bOp! was 
significantly younger in the 
ages of their members, but theii 
ability was just as grand. 

JM 




Prancers and Dancers 

Dance Ensemble Dazzles During Performance 



The Boston College 
Dance Ensemble, the performing 
dance company, was organized, 
choreographed, and produced by 
students. This year, the forty 
members of the Ensemble shared 
the same love and passion for the 
performing art of dance. Their 
diligence and determination were 
displayed in every performance. 
The diversity displayed in the 
choreography and music made 
for truly exciting performances. 
Some of the main goals of the 
BC Dance Ensemble were to 
increase publicity to make 
themselves more visible to the to 
the student body. The Dance 
Ensemble has been in existence 



...communication that 
reaches out & touches 
without saying a word. 
- Terri Trespicio 

f§ 

for ten years at BC and continues 
to grow each year. In the words 
of Terri Trespicio ' 95 , "'Dance is 
that phenomenal dimension of 
communication that reaches out 
and touches without ever saying 
a word." 

JM 




Left: A Dancer' s Christmas added to 
the holiday festivities. 

Below: BCbOp! members performed 
for the community in December, 
1994. 





Nicole Griffiths 



Nicole Griffiths 



Above: bOp! members harmonize 
during a jazz number. 

Left: A member of Dance 
Ensemble performs m A Dancer's 
Christmas.. 



Music & Dance Groups 135 



In The Spotlight 



Theater Arts Groups Dazzle All 
The performing arts have of Virginia Woolf ? The 

oldest student organization on 
campus, EC's Dramatics 
Society, presented The 



. . .the purpose of playing, whose 
end, both at first and now, was 
and is to hold, as twere the 
mirror up to nature. 

Hamlet (III,ii) 



^t- 



Below: Cast and crew of The 
Fantastiks . directed by Robert 
Fortier and featuring DS President 
Jeffrey Croteau. 



been one of Boston College's 
oldest traditions. Each year, 
several production companies 
select the shows staged the 
following season. The variety of 
the shows produced each year 
afford students worlds of choice 
and opportunity, whether their 
interests lie in performance, 
direction, production or design. 
The University Theater 
was the ideal environment for 
faculty-student collaboration. 
The season consisted of faculty 
directed shows which were 
brought to life by student actors 
and student designers. This year ' s 
Mainstage season included As 
You Like It , The Children's 
Hour , On the Verge , and 
Company . The University 
sponsored student shows in the 
Bonn Studio were The Diaiy of 
Anne Frank and Who's Afraid 



I 




Courlcsy of Nora Francescuii 



Right: The Diary of Anne Frank , 
directed by Sean Lily , featured Derek 
Chism, Laura Lenahan, Kate 
McCarthy, and Sarah Streiff. 



Fantasticks and True West this 
year. DS members. President 
Jeffrey Croteau and the executive 
board oversaw production 
aspects from ticket sales to set 
construction to publicity. DS also 
held an annual Spring banquet at 
which time the faculty bestowed 
awards on parting seniors for 
their abilities, achievements, and 
devotion. 

EC's Contemporary 
Theater is a student-run and 
student-funded group. 

Hallmarks of CT: leaning on 
each other, taking risks, and 
producing relevant, current 
pieces. This season, under the 
direction of General Manager 
Robert Fortier, CT produced 
Lonely Planet and Beyond 



Therapy . 

The Children's Theater 
Company of Boston College 
specialized in performance for 
kids, which obviously requires 
endless supplies of energy, 
enthusiasm, and improv skills. 
By taking their act on the road, 
this company introduced junior 
audience members to theater in a 
way that was exciting, 
understandable, and accessible. 

This past year has been 
a season of change for Robsham 
and all its inhabitants. Having 
lost two of their most beloved 

teachers, mentors, and friends in 

ii 

the past two years, Fr. Denis P. ; 
Moran and Dr. J. Paul Marcoux, 
students and faculty know thatj 
BC Theater will never be then 
same, hispired and challenged' 
by their memories, they hope to] 
fuel feelings of love andloss intoj 
their endeavors. 

NF I 



136 Activities 




Below: The main stage production 
of As You Like It featured Mary 
Hubbell and Courtney Heins. 




Simryn K, Puri 




Courtesy of Nora Franccscani 



Dramatics Society Board 




The Lonely Planet 




Joseph B. Plurad 



Contemporary Theater Board 



Theater Arts 137 




Thomas S. Rudcgeair 



My Mother's Fleabag 




Courtesy of Keviii Johii.si 



Hello . . . Shovelhead 




Thomas S. Rudegcair 



The Bostonians 



138 Activities 





Thomas S. Rudcgeair 



Above: Abbey Wood of the 
Bostonians singing with feeling. 




Left: Todd Garman belting out his 
emotions. 

Below: Audiences at Fleabag were 
known to yell wacky phrases when 
asked for impromptu suggestions. 



Bottom Right: 

taking a break. 



Two Shovelheads 




h(.ini,is S KudciZCiiir 



Thomas S. Rude>ieair 



EC's Comedy Connection 

Fleabag and Shovelhead Amuse All 



Though some have their 
particular favorites, the seasoned 
student knows that here at BC, the 
best ofboth worlds is almost always 
possible — especially when the 
desiredresultiscontagious laughter 
and a great show. 

My Mother's Fleabag 
makes up half of the on-campus 
comedy troupe duo. Fleabag is 
proud of its status as the oldest 
college improv group in the United 
States. Their semester shows and 
cafes consist of improv games that 
involve the audience with 
Fleabaggersaskingforwildphrases 
and out-of-the-way locations which 
the group would weave into their 
improvs. As one Fleabagger re- 
enacted skating with Fr. Monan on 
the moon, another often confused, 
always persistent Fleabagger tried 
to guess what was going on. The 
shows were interspersed with some 



scripted skits that perceptively 
poked fun at BC life, and 
culminated in an original Fleabag 
opera. This faU's show ended with 
a staging of The Silence of the 



^ 



Fleabag or Shovelhead— 

either pick is a winner, 

but both is your best bet. 

-Nora Fransescani 



f^ 



Lambs sung to the tune of popular 
sitcom theme songs. Enough said. 
He Ho... Shovelhead! 
makes up the second half of BC's 
comedy scene. Shovelhead 
members wrote and staged all of 
their skits, but because of the nature 
of live performance, as well as the 



energetic and comfortable show 
atmosphere, the Shovelheads 
would be the first to tell you that 
improv undoubtedly caine into 
play. Gasson 100 (once known 
exclusively as the Sperm Room, 
and more recently as "the 
Shovelhead stage where there are 
classes during the week") was the 
usual performance site. 
Shovelheads did their sharp, 
physical, sarcastic thing as only a 
tme Shovelhead could. Easy to 
spot, the Shovelheads were the 
only ones in the house who could 
keep a straight face. 

Though Fleabaggers and 
Shovelheads are loved and 
appreciated atBCtheworldoutside 
of Main Gate has been quick to 
take note of their special talents. 
Former Fleabaggers have gone on 
to win acceptance at Qiicago's 
prestigious Second City Improv. 




C(miies\ ol Kevin Johnson 



Shovelheads have tasted fame in 
Boston's Catch a Rising Star 
Comedy Club, as well as in Ireland 
andEngland. Eitherpickisawinner, 
but both is your best bet. 

NF 



Fleabag/Shovelhead 139 



Right: Asian Caucus members 
gather to prepare for a meeting. 

Below: The O.L.A.A. office is a 
place to gather for planning events. 




iosrot* 



\9: \:;:-. 



ORGAfflAW OF uriHAMEMCAH AFFAIRS 



I 

P. 
if 
> 

? 

o 




''^'^:^':^mjfimi-_mT]M ■ GwrfMALA > URUGUAY 






Cultural Immersion 



Multicultural Clubs on Campus Know How to Unify the Masses^ 
The many intercultural BC community together", stated Hawaiian Luau with a buffet 



Above: Student Activities Day brings 
unity among friends. 



140 Activities 



clubs of Boston College all share 
the main goal of promoting the 
various cultures that are 
represented on campus. The 
intercultural clubs pride 
themselves on their diversity and 
dissimilar backgrounds which 
allow anyone from any culture 
to become a member. They 
encourage race relations and the 
understanding of different ways 
of life. 

The Asian Caucus is 
composed of the Korean 
Students Association, Indian 
Students Association, Japan 
Club, Hong Kong Club, Hawaii 
Club, and Phihppine Society. 
They all strive to expand the 
knowledge of their individual 
cultures. "Sponsoring cultural 
dinners, lectures, and dances 
were all ways of bringing the 



Richard Song of the KSA. The 
nights of entertainment bring a 
spirit of unity between students 
amid variations in culture. Many 
of these clubs also visit other 
colleges to experience different 
social, political, and cultural 
opportunities as well as to meet 
people who share a common 
interest in the cultures. 

VivekSailam felt, "The 
ISABC is an up-and-coming 
club which hopes to get more 
involved in the BC 
community". Traditional Indian 
dances and fashion shows are 
ways that the 8,000 year old 
culture was spread across the 
BC campus. 

The Hawaii Club serves 
as a support group for the BC 
students who are so far away 
from home. They also host a 



dinner and hula lessons. The 
entertainment also includes 
singing and dancing from the 
Hawaiianculture. This small club 
also has cultural outings in 
Boston and cultural discussions. 
The Philippine Society 
works hard to continue the 
cultural network with otheil 
Philippine Americans] 

throughout the nation. 
"Working with AHANA, wej 
attend the Philippine 
Intercollegiate Network 
Dialogue in Fairfield. 
Connecticut to discus^ 
Philippine and Philippincii 
American issues", commenteo' 
Angela Esmilla from the: 
Philippine Society. They alscl 
sponsored a Performing Arts' 
Night... 

Continued on page 14: 



i 




Above: The Indonesian Club signs 
up many members on Student 
Activities Day. 




Philippine Society 




Korean Student Association 




Asian Caucus 



Multicultural Clubs 141 




Asian Caucus Board 




Indian Student Association 




Chinese Student Association 



142 Activities 



Below: The O.L. A. A. officers take a 
break at a Cafe Night. 




Elena Vizary 



-r ' -s."^- 



?\:. ^ 




Above: A lot of preparation was put 
into Asian Caucus sponsored events. 



I 

Multicultural Awareness 

I Clubs Represent All Nationalities and Welcome Newcomers 



Continued from page 140 

• Nfight to promote music and art 

I within the BC community. They 
worked with other clubs to share 
the common Hispanic and 

^ American cultures; the majority 

I of its members are not of 

; Philippine background. 

The Korean Students 
Association also sponsored 
events with AHANA this year, 
including lectures on African, 
Latin, and Korean American 
ssues. They had a Culture Night 
ind a talent show which were 
lights of cultural hterature and 
nusic. They hoped to cultivate 

\ md promote interest in Korean 
listory and the facets of the 
Korean American experience, 
rhey also visited the groups at 

' Harvard and M.I.T. to share their 

I deas. 

Another branch of the 



cultural clubs represents Europe 
in the BC community. These 
clubs promote the culture of 
Westem Europe and involve BC 
students of all backgrounds. 

Club Espagnol, II 
Circolo Italiano, Irish Society, 
Hellenic Society, Portuguese 
Club, German Club, Armenian 
Club, Colombian Club, Puerto 
Rico Club, United Front, and 
OLAA all fall into this category. 
The Hellenic Society found it 
important to include everyone 
this year in its support of the 
Hellenic Cardiac Fund and the 
Hellenic Carton Nursing Home 
with its formal dance and trip to 
Montreal. They supported 
intemational unity as a theme of 
their speakers. The German Club 
showed German films once a 
month and sponsored a large 



Christmas party. Maile Rehbock 
stated, "One of this small group ' s 
goals is to encourage people to 
study abroad and receive the total 
German experience, an 
experience which is hard to get at 
BC." Club Espagnol wanted to 
involve as many people as 
possible by planning parties 
immersed in the Spanish culture. 
The main purpose of this year 
was to revolutionize and organize 
the club with fun and exciting 
events. 

The Portuguese Culmral 
Association sponsored Cafe 
Nights, World Fiesta Day, 
cultural dinners, and various 
speakers. They supported the 
speaking of the Portuguese 
language and the promotion of 
the Portuguese... 

Continued on page 144 





Above: Mario DiManaco described 
the fun Cappuccino Nights and Italian 
Club gatherings to new members. 



Multicultural Clubs 143 



spreading Diversity 



Multicultural Groups on Campus Believe in Sharing Their Heritages 



Continued from page 143 
culture around the world. The 
Irish Society preserved and 
participated in the Irish and 
Celtic heritage at BC . They took 
part in concerts and dances on 
campus. "We participated in 
World Flair and World Fiesta 
Day on the Dust Bowl as well 
as Artists for AIDS and Kells 
Night," said Kristine 
O'Connor. They co-sponsored 
events with the Irish Studies 
Department. 

The United Front 
facilitated interaction between 
cultural clubs. It is made up of 
the Black Student Forum, the 
Caribbean Culture Association, 
the Cape Verdian Student 
Association, and the NAACP. 
Lmani Viney of the United 




144 Activities 



Peter Maiiis 

Above: Zillie Theodorou and 
Georgia Vagenas welcomed any 
curious students who wanted to join 
the Hellenic Society. 

Right: The United Front encouraged 
participation in their many activities. 



Front felt, "This year we tried 
to enlighten students outside 
the classroom about the distinct 
cultures within the African 
culture." The Black Student 
Forum reflected the aspects of 
the African American culture 
by sponsoring Black Politicians 
Night and other lectures. The 
Caribbean Culture Association 
tried to make students feel more 
at home by advertising the 
Caribbean influence in 
America. The newest group, 
Cape Verdian Student 
Association, hoped to introduce 
their culture to the BC 
community. The club wished 
to teach BC about the 1 islands 
300 miles off the West Coast of 
Africa which make up the 
culture. The NAACP promoted 






racial harmony, awareness of 
all races, and civil rights at BC 
This club was a full-time 
advocate for the African 
American and AHANA 
students and co-sponsored the 
week of Kwanzaa. 

The Organization o 
Latino American Affairs united 
the different Latino students 
this year with dancers, 
lecturers, and general meetings. 
They attempted to bring 
together people of differing 
Caribbean and Latin American 
backgrounds . A prime goal was 
to make the BC students aware' 
of the Latino cultures. Overall, 
the various cultural clubs tried 
to join the student body of BC 
with the outside community ol 
Boston. 

MM 




Below: Members ofthe Asian Caucus 
not only discuss andplan future events 
but also gather in the office to socialize 
with friends. 





Japan Club/SE Asian Club 




Indonesian Cultural Club 




Slcphcii J, Anlonik 



Irish Society 



Multicultural Clubs 145 




^^^ 



Stephen J. Anlonik 



Accounting Academy 







Stephen J. Antonik 



Computer Science Academy 




Slcphcii J. Anlonik 



Finance Academy 



146 Activities 




The Boston College 
Conference 



onRMndaliyhrktu 
andtlwEMMMiy 






■■k-"'y-7?^!^i^ 



^^^.'JS^. 



Peter Manis 

Above: The BC Conference on 
Financial Markets and the Economy 
on September 19, 1994 brought 
respected financial and economic 
experts to the Heights. 




Left: John O'Brien. VP of Hill 
Holiday Sports Management, spoke 
with the Marketing Acadmey and 
other interested students. 

Below: Kathleen Scanlan and Jen 
Elenbas prepare the rock samples of 
the day. 




Thomai S, Rudcgcair 



Academics & Its Offerings 



The academic clubs at 
BC often serve as sources for 
activities. Students devote many 
nours to these clubs because they 
provide community services, 
networking opportunities, 
j experience and a social aspect to 
their majors that they never 
thought was possible. It was 
during this past year that the 
Undergraduate Management 
Association was re-named the 
School of Management 
Government - SOMG - "in order 
to increase awareness among 
students", said Michael 
Magliana, SOMG President. 
Bringing CSOM students closer 
together was one of the goals of 
SOMG this year by publishing a 
newsletter highlighting each 
CSOM academy 's activities. The 
Accounting Academy was an 
accounting major's most 



BC Academics Is 
valuable resource when it came 
time to start job hunting. There 
was a mock interview night with 
the "Big 6" firms, a resume 
critique for Juniors and the 



4^ 



SOMG Goal: Increase 

awareness among students 

- Michael Magliana 



■99- 



Charity Volleyball Tournament. 
Office visits to the major 
accounting firms were useful in 
understanding what life in the 
world of the "Big 6" was all 
about. The Finance Academy 
was also very helpful in giving 
seniors a glimpse into the real 



Not Just In the Classrooni 
world. A trip to New York City 
to the New York Stock Exchange 
was scheduled for the second 
semester "to give members a 
better understanding of 
Investment Banking," said 
Alfredo Garcia, co-President 
along with Katie Bowler. Jack 
Falvey spoke on November 10. 
1994 to Finance Academy 
members, other interested 
students and faculty. The 
Marketing Academy used this 
year to rebuild the Academy into 
the strong organization it once 
was. The organization was trying 
to instate a chapter of the 
American Marketing 

Association at BC to promote 
networking. A major event 
scheduled for the Spring 
Semester was a trip to Madison 
Avenue in NYC for 
Continued on page 148 



Slcplicii J Antonik 




Above: The Career Center is not just 
about finding a job. ..it's also about 
finding a major. 



Academic Clubs 147 



Right: Jennifer Spellman explained 
the process of evolution at the 
geology table at the majors fair. 

Below: Michael Hall received advice 
from the President and Vice- 
President of the Society of 
Professional Journalists. 






Learning With Enjoyment 

Opportunities In Academic Activities 



Above: The Philosophy Club advisor 
participated in Student Activities Day. 



148 Activities 



Continued from page 147 
tours of advertising agencies 
and otlier related companies. 
The Computer Science 
Academy's main goal was to 
further career development for 
computer science majors. The 
Academy brought in various 
speakers to allow students to 
explore the opportunities in the 
computer science and 
telecommunications 
industries. 

The English 

Association published a 
monthly newsletter that proved 
to be the most effective way to 
keep the students of the largest 
major at Boston College 
informed. The English 
Association formed peer 
writing workshops and served 
as evaluators in the annual 
hiring process of new faculty. 



The Society of Professional 
Journalists was seeking official 
recognition from the University 
this past year. This club is a 
chapter of a professional 
organization that promotes the 
idea of networking in the 
Journalism field. The club 
sponsored speakers from the 
industry, a job fair in the Spring, 
and a High School essay contest. 
The Fulton Debate Society 
hosted the ADA nationals 
during Spring Break and 
annually qualifies for the 
National Debate Tournament. 
Boston College competed in 
more than twenty tournaments. 
Wenyu Ho, Chairperson of the 
Executive Board, noted that 
"BC is one of the few big 
debating programs that have 
novice andjunior varsity teams" 
that gives all students the 



opportunity to be part of this 
winning team. Kathleen 
Scanlan, Geology Club 
President, said "the Club is a 
very social group where most 
activities combine a social 
atmosphere in a geological 
environment." Hiking and 
skiing trips were planned for 
second semester and there was 
a proposal for a trip to the Grand 
Canyon during Spring Break. 
The Political Science 
Association served as a liaison 
between the department and the 
students. Lectures were 
sponsored throughout the year, 
including a mini-debate 
between a Kennedy campaign 
member and Matt Romney, 
Mitt Romney 's son. One of the 
Mathematics 

Continued on page 151 




Peler Manis 

Above: The Communications table 
at the Majors Fair offered advice to 
undergraduates. 




Stephen J, Antonik 



Geology Club 




Thomas S. Riideaeair 



Marketing Academy 




Stephen J. Antonik 



Mathematics Society 



Academic Clubs 149 




Political Science Association 




Stephen J. Anionik 



Psychology Club 




Tlionias S. Rudcgcair 



Student Nurses Association 



150 Activities 



Below: The Psychology Club amuses 
themselves at a weekly meeting. 




Above: "Hey!. ..What's so funny?" 



Knowledgeable Organizations 



BC Academic Clubs Provide Networking Contacts 



I Continued from page 148 
j Society's main goals, 
' according to President Nicole 
Tillyer, was "to restructure the 
constitution and have more 
organization." Lectures were 
held on topics including 
financial fields, operations 
research, and actuaries. The 
Psychology Club strove to 
allow students to make the most 
out of the Psychology major. 
The Club organized a Graduate 



Admissions Night, A Peer 
Advisement Seminar and 
participated in the Festival of 
Friendship. This was the 
Biological Research Society's 
first year and was founded to 
support students involved in 
research. Plans for the past year 
included lectures and a 
proposed Symposium. 

The Student Nurses 
Association participated in a 



M- 



Fulton Debate Society 
Goal: To give all students 
the opportunity to be pait 
of a winning team. 

-Wenyu Ho 

ff 




TTiomas S. Rudegeair 



Toys for Tots Christmas Gift 
Drive and held a Round Table 
discussion with members of the 
nursing faculty. Many of the 
Nursing majors participated in 
National Nursing Conventions 
held in North Carolina and 
Wisconsin. All these clubs gave 
students the opportunity to 
explore their majors to the 
fullest extent both inside, and 
outside, the classroom. 




ThoiiL-is S. Rudegeair 



Above: The Marketing Academy 
contemplated their next strategy. 



Academic Clubs 151 



Right: AHANA Family Weekend 
Fashion Show brought style to BC. 




Courlcsy of The Heights 




Courtesy of The Heights 

Above: An Asian fan dance was 
performed at "...& Beautiful Ball". 

Right: People attended the AHANA 
Mayes Mentoring Program Closing 
Banquet. 



Diversity Abounds 

AHANA Spreads Cultural Awareness 
AHANA (a.k.a. African Ball in February, and the 2nd 



American, Hispanic, Asian, 
and Native American) is an 
acronymn that Boston College 
started using to replace the word 
"minority." One of the goals at 
the Thea Bowman AHANA 
Center at BC is to promote 
multi-cultural awareness on 
campus, specifically through 
AHANA programming, in 
hopes of maintaining a non- 
racial, socially accepted 
environment for all cultures of 
the BC community. This year 
AHANA members 

successfully planned and 
coordinated programs such as 
the Amy Tan lecture in 
Robsham Theater, the AHANA 
Family Weekend, the "...And 
Beautiful Ball", the AHANA 
Gay and Lesbian Forum, 
semester retreats, the Winter 



annual Multi-Cultural 

Celebration. Another goal of 
AHANA 's is to assist students 
in developing themselves 
academically. The year round 
Mayes Mentoring Program ' 
coordinated by director Dr. 
Donald Brown has joined 
students with BC professors as . 
their mentors. The AHANA 
Center also provides tutoring, 
academic advisement, and 
career counseling in its array 
of services. Vice President of 
AHANA Affairs, Natalie Go, 
is proud to be the liaison 
between AHANA students and 
UGBC because she believes 
AHANA "needs a voice in 
UGBC" in order to inspire 
students to take pride in their 
heritage. 

AL 




Thomas S. Rudcgeair 



152 Activities 



rorward March! 

ROTC and The Semper Fidelis Society 
The four branches of the Academy. The cadets were 
military are represented at 
Boston College through the 
ROTC programs and a military 
community service program. 
The Navy and Air Force ROTC 
programs are conducted through 
Boston University and the Army 
ROTC and the Semper Fidelis 
Society are both organizations 
run through EC. All four 
organizations serve as Officer 
Training Programs that teach the 
cadets about their careers as 
officers in the military following 
graduation. This year, the Navy 
ROTC was made up of all nurses 
due to cutbacks. Members took 
naval sciences and leadership 
classes to train for leadership 
positions once they began their 
four year commitment. This past 
summer, the Navy cadets 
completed a cruise to a navy 
hospital in Pennsicola, Florida. 
There were eleven cadets at BC, 
on scholarship, who were part of 
the Air Force ROTC program 
this past year. They were a 
nationally awarded drill team and 
competed in championships in 
■ California and at the Air Force 



scheduled to tour Washington 

D.C. and participated in a POW 

Vigil on Veteran's Day. The 

Army ROTC program 

participated in two training labs 

per week that involved physical 

training and leadership classes. 

Some of the active training 

involved repelling, grenade 

assaults and practice firings of 

the M-16. The Semper FideUs 

Society was a Marines service 

organization on campus that 

participated in community 

service activities like Toys for 

Tots and visiting VA Hospitals 

in the area. All members took a 

Platoon Leaders Class Program 

and must go to Officer Candidate 

School during the summers to 

receive their commission. This 

year, BC had eight members of 

the Society commissioned as 

officers in the United States 

Marine Corps. The military 

service organizations offered 

through BC gave interested 

students an insight into the 

leadership positions they would 

hold once they began their four 

year tour upon graduation. 

AG 





Courlesj ol Da\ td Burke 



Air Force ROTC 




Courtesy of Belh Meyerowilz 



Navy ROTC 




Courtesy of Dan Levasseur 



Semper Fidelis Society 



Left: The Army ROTC Color Guard stands 

at attention during the National Anthem. AHANA/ROTC 153 




Salt & Light 



■kS4 ^^^ 


P'K ^^^m^-^ T - "^*^-j. Ifc-^^^^fciiMrif^^A^^k 




\ Inl^^u 




H^^SfiflB W> -■ B 'M'M 



Stephen J, Anlonik 



4 Boston 




Thomas S. Rudcgcair 



Liturgy Arts 



154 Activities 




Peler Mjnis j 



Above: The Gold Key Society 
recruited students to participate in 
volunteer projects. 



I 



Left: Greg Zlevor led Salt & Light in 
weekly discussion. 

Below: Liturgy Arts members 
gathered to practice their songs before 
Sunday Mass. 




riiomiis S. Rudcgeali" 



A Commitment To Others 



Almost every student 
It BC has volunteered at one 
ime or another. After all , that ' s 
I major requirement to getting 
nto a good school. But does 
hat mean that once students 
lit college they no longer offer 
heir services to those in need? 
Mot at this Jesuit university, 
rhe number of volunteer 
activities is so large that the 
Drganizations are not only 
overwhelmed with support at 
Activities Day, they also have 
their very own Volunteer Fair. 

Most volunteer groups 
are open to anyone and this a 
major difference from other 
specialized activities or sports. 
The Liturgy Arts Group, which 
sings and plays at all the masses 
on campus, accepted anyone 
with an interest in music. 
TEACH, Through Education 



BC Service Organizations Span the Globe 
All Can Help, was a group of as well as other projects such 
volunteers from all four schools 
at BC that went to inner-city 
schools to help students with 
their homework and plan 



I don't see any reason 
why people should not 
be able to volunteer. 

-Theresa Kanju 
BC TEACH 



^ 



extracurricular activities. 
Teresa Kanju, coordinator of 
TEACH, said, "I don't see any 
reason why people should not 
be able to volunteer." Circle K 
was open to anyone interested 
and this year its members went 
to Soup Kitchens twice a week, 



as a Zoo Trip with young 
students. A BC member. Matt 
O ' Keefe, was elected president 
of Circle K International last 
year. This group monitored the 
activities of all the Circle K 
clubs throughout the world. 

All the volunteer 
groups had an enormous impact 
on the people they were 
helping. Appalachia Volunteers 
brought over 150 students to 
Appalachia over Spring Break. 
These students helped the 
community with many things, 
such as clearing brush and 
building houses. Although 
this project only lasted one 
week, the rest of the year was 
spent raising the $28,000 
needed to go down there. The 
Festival of Friendship, which 
Continued on page 156 




e'oiirlcscy ol Shelley Johannesen 

Above: Jamaica Volunteers, like 
Shelley Johannesen, spend their 
Spring Break helping impoverished 
children. 



Service Groups 155 



Right: Liz Weiss prepares for a 
busy day as SAP Coordinator in the 
Student Admissions Office. 

Below: The Liturgy Arts group 
practicing for their next performance. 





Siephen J. Anlonik 




Service By Students For Students ! 

Jesuit Spirit of Service Attracts Students to BC 



Courtesy of Jennifer Alvarez 

Above: Children of the Belize 
Summer Camp rally around Belize 
volunteer Bobby Nolan. 



156 Activities 



Continued from page 155 

took place this Spring, brought 
special needs children to BC 
to participate in games, watch 
shows, and have a cook-out. 
The Freshmen Assistant 
Program gave each incoming 
freshmen an upperclassman to 
whom they could turn with 
their questions about life at 
BC. During the first weekend 
at school, freshmen met with 
their assistant in Conte Forum 
and arranged Whale Watching 
Trips, outings to a Bruin's 
games, and other get-to-know- 
each-other activities. The 
student Admissions Program 
(SAP) drew more volunteers 
than any other organization on 
campus, over 550. There are 
eight SAP programs: Greeters, 
Day Visit Hosts, Interviewers, 
Tour Guides, Outreach, 
Transfer Relations, AHANA 



International, and Office 
Management. Coordinator Liz 
Weiss said, "When you have 
parents come up to you and say 
how at home or how 
comfortable they felt at BC it 
really makes you feel good, like 
you're doing the right thing." 
Some of the volunteer 
groups are designed to help both 
the BC students and people in 
the community. The Jenks 
Leadership Program (JLP), 
funded by the Sandy Jenks 
Endowment, is the oldest 
leadership program at Boston 
College. This program is a two 
year commitment in which the 
students first learn the skills 
they need to be a leader and 
then apply their skills to projects 
such as Dorm Day of Service. 
Coordinator Shelley Johannsen 
said, "We're not looking for the 
people who look polished... 



those people don't need us." 
Prayer, service, sharing 
learning, cooperating andhavin^ 
fun are all part of the Salt & Ligh 
Company's mission statement 
This group planned religion; 
retreats for not only students bu 
also the elderly. 

PULSE is a class th 
included both academics an 
service. Students participate 
in field work at places lik 
Rosie's Place and th 
Cambridge Guidance Center i]| 
order to better understand tb 
philosophy and theology the;, 
learned in class. 

4 Boston matche( 
students with voluntee 
organizations in the communit; 
such as the West End Boys an( 
Girls Club and St. Franci 
Hospital, where the; 
volunteered four hours a week' 
Continued on page 15 1 



1 




J-Lson Rcblarido 



Above: Frank Vitolo, Craig Tyndale 
and Frank Ceruzzi enjoyed 
themselves at the SAP Christmas 
party. 




.lason Reblando 



Student Admissions Program 




Thomas S, Rudegcair 



Freshman Assistant Advisory Board 




Elena Vizvary 



Emerging Leaders Program 



Service Groups 157 




Courtesy of Shelley Johannesen 



Jenks Leadership Program 




(. DiiiiLsv ol Di;uia Biinnan 



Appalachia Volunteers 




PULSE 



158 Activities 




Top: JLP even scaled "The Wall" 
during the Rolling Ridge Retreat. 



Above: JLP members participated 
in a "Day of Service" at the Boston 
Food Bank. 



Service in Boston and Beyond 

gC Service Pro grams Making A Dijference continued from page 1 56 

they volunteered four hours a 




■1 




week. 

Last year the thousands 
of volunteers at BC made a big 
difference. Not only did they 
help themselves, but they also 
helped people in the sun-ounding 
community and people in far 
away places. 

66 



...it really makes you feel 
good, like you're doing 
something right. 

- Liz Weiss 



Left: Jessica Cox and Diana Bannan 
volunteered to help Appalachian 
children during Spring Break. 



I ,HiHfs\ 111 DiatK. Hiiiinji 




8»I^»»I4 





f^K 




Courtesy ot'Tara Murphy 



AboveJamaican Volunteers helped 
underprivileged children during 
Spring Break. 



Cnurtcsy of Shelley Johannesen 



Service Groups 159 



Advocating Awareness 

BC Awareness Groups Bring Social Concerns to Campus 



...has made a conscious 
effort to combine students 
and administration in 
working together. 
- Rosemary Palumbo 



Whether one is 
encouraging environmental 
awareness or AIDS awareness, 
there is something that ties all of 
EC's Awareness Groups together 
— fighting for something you 
believe in and want others to think 
about. 



made a co-effort to take dining hall 
recyclables to a local recycling 
plant. Rosemary Palumbo believes 
that'T.R.E.E.hasmadeaconscious 
effort to combine students and the 
administrationinworkingtogether. 
Although the student body may 
believe our campus is apathetic to 
T.R.E.E., also known as recycling, the people in T.R.E.E. November AIDS Action Dance- 1 
The Recycling Effort for the continue to work hard convincing a-thon,theDecemberCandleLighl 



awareness by co-sponsoring Mug 
Day and Earth Day with T.R.E.E 
The AIDS Awareness 
Committee organized a series ol 
events this year that were meant to 
educate people, break stereotypes 
and raise discussions about how 
AIDS affects everyone. The 



Environment, has existed on 
campus since 1990. Led by Co- 
Directors Rosemary Palumbo and 
Amy Pesapane,T.R.E.E. members 
helped to distribute free P.U.R.E. 
mugs to initiate freshmen into the 
campus recycling effort, brought 
back the recycling boxes for 



others that everyone should try to 
preserve the environment." 

The Environmental 
Action Center, EAC, is another 
activistgroupthathasabroadfocus 
on environmental issues, and 
campus ecology. Directed by co- 
presidents Sara Gaudette and 



Vigil onO'NeillPlaza,theFebruaiyi 
"For Love of Life" benefit ai 
O'ConneU House, and the March 
Annual Artists for AIDS al 
Robsham were all successful 
activities that increased people's 
awareness about AIDS. Oneofthe 
cabinet members, Bridgette 



recycling cans, glass and plastic Shawn Downes, EAC did many Payette, said she is involved with;! 

bottles in the dorm rooms and things: recycling the plastic BC the committee because "AIDS is £ 

dispelled the myth of dining hall Bookstore bags, campaigning disease that affects everyone anc 

recycling. T.R.E.E. members and against the deforestation of the should concern everyone." 

BC's Building and Grounds staff Rainforest, and promoting Continued on page 163 




Peler Manis 

Above: AIDS Awareness Committee 
members, Bridgette Payette and Rica 
Goco, recruit at Student Activities 
Day. 




160 Activities 



Above: Rosemary Palumbo and Amy 
Pesapane officiate at a weekly 
T.R.E.E. meeting. 



Below: The Women's Resource 
Center bulletin board explores the 
many different issues that involve us 
all. 




Tliuinas S. Rudegcair 







N 



AIDS Awareness Committee 







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Fulton Debating Society 



Awareness Groups 161 




H.E.A.R.T. 




Thomas S. Rudeseair 



T.R.E.E. 




Women's Resource Center 



162 Activities 




Above: T.R.E.E. members Suz 
Murray and Anne Maxson recrui 
students with an interest in th« 
environment. 




Left: The executive board of EAC 
plans events for the upcoming 
semester. 

Below: LGBC member Trisha Kipp 
discusses the relevant issues of 
society with Alison McGuigan. 




Believing In A Cause 



Continued from page 1 60 

H.E.A.R.T., Help 
Educate Alcohol (and other 
drugs) Responsibility 

Together, was led by student 
coordinators Sandra Brum and 
Pat Roy, and Assistant Dean of 
Alcohol and Drug Education, 
Kimberley Timpf , in spreading 
drug and alcohol awareness 
across campus. H.E.A.R.T. 
started the year focusing on 
programs in the dorms such as 
putting on skits about date rape, 
stress and alcohol and having 
to live as adult children of 
alcoholics. They also hosted 
guest speakers, showed movies 
and held discussions about 
alcohol issues. Second 
semester found this group 
organized to expand by 
departmentalizing into 
programming, publicity, long- 



Awareness 
term planning and outreach. 
H.E.A.R.T. used this 
opportunity to branch out to 
more of the BC campus and 
beyond. 

LGBC, the Lesbian, 
Gay. Bisexual Community of 
Boston College, although not 
officially recognized by Boston 
College, has made a name for 
themselves on campus. Co- 
directed by Ryan Brady and 
Kathy Mackin, LGBC has been 
a support network for those 
interested.Their meetings were 
a place for members to socialize 
and develop friendships. This 
group also sponsored guest 
speakers, provided a support 
group for parents and friends, 
and made an effort to spread 
awareness of LGBC on campus 
and beyond. Brady said he was 



Brings Knowledge to BC 
"proud to be a member of a 
group that's opening the minds 
of students and challenging 
them to deal with sexual 
diversity and the status quo." 
The Women's 

Resource Center, under the 
coordination of Trena Yonkers, 
provided volunteer/job 
opportunities for students, 
hosted guest speakers, and 
sponsored support groups for 
sexual assault, eating disorders 
and sexual identity. Some 
activites throughout the year 
included Take Back the Night, 
a hiking trip to Vermont, 
service days in the Allston/ 
Brighton community, a Moon 
Dance in April and weekly 
"brown bag" lunches on 
women's issues. 

AL 




Above: EAC member. Amy Glaub, 
takes part in a lively discussion about 
the deforestation of the Rainforest. 



Awareness Groups 163 



Right: The Heights staff always 
managed to have fun even around 
deadline time. 

Below: A relaxed atmosphere was 
essential in the Stylus office. 






Soaring to Literary Heights 



Above: Becky Yang — hard at work 
at the drafting table in The Heights 
office. 



164 Activities 



The 

The power of the word 
is strong and fierce. 
Information, feelings, 
opinions, and pure fantasy can 
all be conveyed through 
writing. The written 
publications at BC gave all of 
the student body the option 
and ability to express 
themselves in so many ways. 
The Heights, as a newspaper, 
allowed students to report the 
facts and state their opinions 
on important issues. Stylus, 
EC's literary magazine, 
channels the student body's 
creativity through many styles 
of writing. 

The Heights is a 
student run, privately owned 
organization that is completely 
independent from the 
University. It is published on 
a weekly basis for the BC 



Heights and Stylus Explor 

community's reading pleasure. 
The Heights is a free publication 
that displays the writing talents 
of many individuals. The 
sections of the paper ranged 
from a factual news section, 
which kept people aware of 
current events, to the feature's 
section, which is a basic free 
for all where any written topic 
will do. Students who wrote for 
the paper are given hands on 
experience with the writing 
field or simply a fun and 
productive way to express 
themselves. The entire staff 
worked very hard to bring a 
quality and objective 
newspaper to the stands each 
week. The paper was an 
extremely important part of the 
college because it keeps 
everyone informed of the issues 
that surrounded the school and 



e the Writing Talents at BC 

affected us as students. It alsc 
gave students an outlet to fora 
and express their opinions or 
the issues of the world arounq 
us. 

Stylus is a very differenj 
publication from The Heights 
It is a literary magazine thai 
brings the intellectual creativitj 
of the entire campus to a head 
Any student who wished, hac 
the ability to submit a work tc 
the magazine for print. This 
written publication allowec 
students to run free with theii 
thoughts and feelings. The 
writings in the magazine are an 
honest emotional account ol 
people's interpretations aboul 
the issues that surround us in 
life. 

ES 




Above: Karen Crincolli, Business 
Editor for The Heights, discussing 
articles for the next issue. 




Stylus 



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Slcphcn J. Antonik 



English Association 



Stylus/The Heights 165 




Film Board 




Stephen J. Antonik 



Eagle TV 




WZBC 



166 Activities 



Below: President of Eagle TV, Alex 
Zilberman getting ready for an editing 
session. 




Media Mergers & Acquisitions 

[ Technology and Progress at the Heights 



I > 



The Boston College 
ntertainment circuit has many 
nd varied ways of reaching its 
tudent population. The many 
tudent run media organizations 
ring us what they have to offer 
/ith uniqueness and style. Each 
nd every one of these clubs 
ride themselves on providing a 
ommunication service to the 
iC community which no other 
roup on campus does. 

WZBC,90.3FM,isBC's 

ery own radio station. It has been 

caching students through the 

irwaves for 15 years. At 1000 

/atts of power, it is the third most 

owerful college radio station in 

we area. The station was run 

' ompletely by students who take 

le hands on experience very 

. eriously. WZBC was very 

I jccessful in the non-commercial 

i x;k sector of radio, yet it could 



also be found broadcasting the 
Eagle's home games in basketball 
and hockey and all of the season's 
football games. 

The BC Filmboard is 
another club on campus which 
added an extra source of 
amusement for the student body. 
This organization is a small 
informal one which brings free 
movies to the campus often on 
weekends throughoutthe year. The 
members feel "this is an important 
part of the social life at the college 
because it gives students an 
alternative to drinking." 

The Video Yearbook was 
the University's version of the 
history of the past year. This Video 
Yearbook was very similar in 
organization to the actual written 
yearbook - it was the year in review 
of sports, events and student life. 
The tape, which runs for about 



thirty minutes, is a diverse and 
all-encompassing publication. 
During the year, students could 
be found capturing many 
priceless moments. 

Eagle T.V. is Boston 
College's own cable TV station 
that could be seen at McElroy 
and on the local Newton cable 
station. The students involved in 
production ran all aspects of the 
station: filming, editing, and 
running of the show. With the 
installation of Eaglenet to the 
campus next year, BC will gain 
the edition of four cable stations. 
Eagle T.V. will be at the very 
core of the new programming. 
According to Alexandra 
Zilberman, the president of the 
station, "Eagle T.V. will become 
a part of the new stations to be 
installed next year." 

ES 



Eagle TV will become a 
huge part of the new 
stations on EagleNet. 

-Alex Zilberman 



^f- 




Stephen J. Anlonik 



PcicrManis Abovc: Carol Bums adjusting the 
volumes before broadcast. 



Media 167 



. . .first hand knowledge of 
what business in the real 
world will consist of... 
- Nicole Poirier 



Getting Students From Here to There 



BC Student Agencies and CIA Coordinate Social Schedules 



-9^ 



The BC Student 
Agencies and the CIA were 
two key organizations on 
campus. They both brought 
unique and invaluable services 
and opportunities to the college 
population. The BC Student 
Agencies allowed students to 
try their hands at management. 
The Campus Information and 
Activities group, or the CIA, 
brought the upcoming events 
at the University to everyone ' s 
attention. 

The BC Student 
Agencies included five 
separate businesses this 
academic year. These 



enterprises were: Cheers, a 
business which delivered 
things such as birthday cakes 
and balloons to the residents 
on campus, BC Tees, BC 
Advertising, which helped to 
promote other local businesses 
across campus and published 
The Source, BC Travel, which 
offered trips to the BC 
community, and BC Storage , 
which offered a summer 
storage facility for students' 
belongings. As Nicole Poirier 
of the organization states, "The 
students involved in these 
ventures have been given the 
opportunity of a lifetime. They 



now have some first hand 
knowledge of what business in 
the real world will consist of." 
The CIA has a very 
different yet just as important 
function. It provided the entire 
campus with an agenda of 
upcoming events. The 
newsletter was published on a 
bi-weekly basis. The 
information gave students the 
opportunity to attend certain 
events they may not have been 
aware of otherwise. It also 
helped to insure the success of 
the events which took place. 
The CIA is invaluable to the 
Boston College social calendar. 

ES 




Above: Okay 
itinerary... 



Right: "Hi, this is Keith and I'm 
calHng to confirm your reservation." 



168 Activities 



Below: BC Travel can plan your 
Spring Break without the hassle of a 
travel agency. 




Thomas S. Rudegeair 







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Thomas S. Rudegeair 



BC Student Agencies 



Campus Infoifflati<» 
and Activities 



Campus Information & Activites 




CIA In Action 



CIA/Student Agencies 169 




Peter Manis 



Rugby 




Elena Vizvary 



Karate 



1 









Erika Dimmler 



Jiu-Jitsu 



170 Activities 




Above: Self-defense was taught at 
the Plex. 



Erika Dimmler 




Left: Men and women practiced in 
the art of kicking. 

Below: Crew recruited at Student 
Activities Day. 




Elena Vizvary 



Facing the Physical Challenge 

Intermural and Club Sports for the Non-Varsity Athlete 



With over twenty-three 
iifferent fall intramural sports 
done, not to mention club 
sports, as well as Jiu Jitsu 
essons and the Karate Club, 
students here were never 
vvithout something to do. 
[ntramural sports, which was 
leaded this year by Theresa 
Lavin and five student 
assistants, allowed students the 
;hance to compete with others. 
In the words of Ms. Lavin, "the 
main goal in the intramural 
sports program is to offer 
something for everybody. It is 
a chance to get all students 
involved if they want to be 
involved." Intramural sports is 
:;ompletely funded through 
student fees and through the 
athletic association. 

"Hi, I was just 
wondering if you would like to 
buy a t-shirt for crew?" 
Members of club sports were 



willing to sell t-shirts and raffle 
tickets door to door or 
whatever was required of them 
to compete for their team. 
Although, not funded by the 



M- 



The main goal... is to offer 
something for everybody. 
-Theresa Lavin 



^ 



school, club sports were 
another big attraction for 
students this year. Students of 
all capabilities joined in the 
fun. The crew team, a major 
attraction for BC residents, 
participated in such prestigious 
competitions as the Head Of 
The Charles Regatta. Other 



club sports include field 
hockey, ultimate Frisbee, 
tennis, and soccer,justtoname 
a few. 

"The Jiu Jitsu program 
at Boston College, in its fifth 
year at the university, is a 
martial arts program which 
focuses on realistic self- 
defense techniques." With 
over ninety-five participants, 
Sensei Nick Theodorou, has 
seen quite a growth in interest 
in his concentration from his 
meager beginnings as a 
freshman teaching this art, 
which is the oldest Japanese 
martial art in existence today, 
to friends in the lounge of his 
dorm in Newton Campus. The 
Sensei also attempted to 
educate those not in his 
program, going through the 
dorms giving self-defense 
courses with the help of his 
students. MA 




Above: BC Rugby fought for the ball 
against Dartmouth. 



Intermural/Club Sports 171 







172 # Shining Through 



IL 




\ \ 





SPORTS 

BC Continues its 
Winning Ways 

Sports do not build character. They reveal it." - Heywood 
Brown. Teamwork, sportsmanship, and the love of the 
game set BC apart from its opponents. EC's winning attitude, 
determination and heart brought out the pride and spirit of 
the athlete and fans. The renovated Alumni Stadium provided 
the perfect setting for defeat of the Irish in football and the 
seizing of the Big East title by the Field Hockey team. The 
year was marked with changes and growth. New forces, 
new strategies and new talents invaded the Heights, while 
veteran athletes continued to excel. Our student-athletes 
pushed themselves to succeed not only in the sport they 
love, but also in the classroom. This desire, combined with 
extraordinary talent, truly made our sports program shine 
through. 



Deborah McNamara 
Editor 



Sports # 173 



Whe team celebrates 
■after Syracuse's 
quarterback, Kevin 
! Mason, gets sacked 
by Mike Mamula. 



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True success is some- 
thing one achieves through hard I 
work. Forasport:,it requires team 
effort and team unity. The 1994 
Football Team saw such success 
because it utilized its talent to I 
make the sacks, make the run- 
ning plays, and make the touch- 
downs. 

Certain players on the] 
team were rewarded for their tal- 
ents and hard work by being 
named to the All-Big East Con- 
ference Team. Five BC players 
were named to the first team. 
They included senior tight end I 
Pete Mitchell who broke the 
school record for career yardage ! 
andbrokeMarkChmura'srecord i 
for most receptions, Mike 
Mamula, junior defensive end 
who led the team in sacks, along 
with senior linebacker Stephen | 
Boyd who led the team in tackles. 

Those who were named I 
to the first-teamoffensewere jun- 
ior left guard Greg Landry and | 
junior left tackle Pete Kendall. 
Thesecond-teamers included jun- 
ior nose guard Tim Morabito, I 
senior tailbackDavidGreen, who 
had broken the 1,000 yard msh- 
ing mark this season, and senior 
punterJeffBeckley,whowasthe j 
key factor in helping BC lead the 
nationintotalyardspunted. These 
athletes gave the fans thriUs and 
proved that success has its re- 
wards. 



Pcit-rManifi 



30-11: 
Need We Say More? 



On October 20, 1993,the 
I Boston College Eagle football 
I team scored what could be consid- 
I ered their greatest victory ever with 
I a4 1 -39 upset win over undefeated 
land number one ranked Notre 
I Dame on a last second field goal 
I by David Gordon. This upset cost 
I Notre Dame a national champion- 
|ship. 

This was the precursor to 
I this year ' s rematch at newly reno- 
Ivated Alumni Stadium. The Irish 
I came into the game ranked eighth, 
I their only loss coming to highly 
[ranked Michigan on a last second 
I field goal, and still in the hunt for 
I the national championship. 

The Eagles, on the other 
Ihand, seemed to be hit hard by 
I losses of players to graduation and 
I most of the coaching staff to the 
I NFL. They came into the game 
I with a record of 1 -2 and were not 
levenranked.Theonlythingpeople 
I were talking about, even though 
I Irish Head Coach Lou Holtz 
[downplayed it, was revenge. The 
["experts" in the local papers even 
[picked Irish victories by 30 or 40 
[points. Dan Henning and the 
[Eagles, however, had something 
[ else in mind. As most of the capac- 
1 ity crowd poured into the field, the 

realization was there. Boston Col- 

legehadpummeled the seemingly 
[ overmatched Fighting Irish by the 
[ dominating score of 30- 1 1 . 

The game got off to a bit 
I of a bad start for the maroon and 

gold fans as the Irish took a 3-0 
[lead set up by a fumble. Things, 

however, soon changed. On fourth 
[down in deep Irish territory, Dan 

Henning puUed a play out of his 
I bag of tricks. He brought Gordon 
I on for what seemed to be the tying 
[field goal, but when the ball was 



snapped, holder Matt Hassleback 
took it up the middle for a gain of 
8 yards and a first down. "It was 
fitting that the play was called 
Leprechaun," later stated 
Hasselback. This led to a David 
Green touchdown run and a lead 
that would never be relinquished. 

The Eagles dominated the 
Irish in all facets of the game on 
this day.Theypoundedout 244 of 
their 350 total yards of offense on 
the ground, led by junior Justice 
Smith who gained 144 yards and 
scored 2 touchdowns. "This was 
a blue collar effort by our team. 
We had an excellent game plan 
that was executed by a bunch 
of very tough guys," said 
Henning. The defense, led by 
Stephen Boyd and Mike 
Mamula, also lived up to 
Henning 's praise by humbling 
freshman sensation Ron 
Powlus, holding him to 5 of 21 
completions for a mere 50 
yards and two interceptions to 
safety Terrance Wiggins. The 
special teams also excelled 
with senior punter Jeff Beckley 
booming punts and kickoffs 
while the coverage teams 
bottled up the potentially ex- 
plosive Irish return men. 

This day, as it did the 
year before, belonged to the 
Eagles. It also gave the student 
body a reason to storm Alumni 
Field. The team has taken a 2- 
1 lead in what some have be- 
gun to call the Vatican Bowl. 
In doing so, they had estab- 
lished themselves as a strong 
national program and proved 
to the nation which was 
America's number one Irish 
Catholic school. 

Kevin Hodsdon 



"■it. 



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V'^'^^4 




Peler Manis 

Left Page (Top): Justice Smith is on his way to score a touchdown 
against the Irish. (Bottom): Greg Grice evades an Irish defenseman. 
Right Page (Top): Chris Sullivan tackles an Irish ball carrier. (Bottom 
Left): Fr. Bob Braunreuther gives words of wisdom to the media. 
(Bottom Middle): Lou Holtz looks on with futile hopes. (Bottom Right): 
Mike Mamula tackles Irish QB Ron Powlus. 

Football 177 




A Season 

Marked 

by Change 



Transition marked the 
beginning of the 1994 Boston 
College Eagle football season as 
the Tom Coughlin era ended 
and there was the birth of a new 
chapter in maroon and gold his- 
tory under new head coach Dan 
Henning. In the first game 
against Michigan, BC displayed 
talent and effort. After buUding 
an early lead, the team allowed a 
highly ranked Michigan team to 
climb back into the game, and 
the Wolverines triumphed by a 
score of 36-24. 

The next game was 
against Virginia Tech where the 
Hokies saw a victory come their 
way in a game dominated by the 
defense. Hope for the season 
was lifted when tlie team scored 
its first victory over an out- 
manned Pitt team by a score of 
21-9. 

Next came mighty 
Notre Dame. For the second 
year in a row the Eagles knocked 
off the Fighting Msh. This, in a 
way, could have been seen as a 
jump start to the rest of the sea- 
son. The team then proceeded to 
go the next five games without a 
loss, beating Temple, Army, 
Lx)uisville, and tying Rutgers 
before pummelling a seemingly 
overmatched Syracuse team 3 1 - 
0. This led to speculation of a 
major bowl bid. However, after 
losing to West Virginia and 
Miami, BC ended up taking a 
trip to the Aloha Bowl in Ha- 
waii. 



Although they experi- 
enced an up and down season, 
certain Eagles excelled. On the 
offensive side of the ball, Pete 
Mitchell became BC's all time 
leading receiver while continu- 
ing to be the go-to-guy. Run- 
ning backs David Green and 
Justice Smith gave the team 
great speed on tlie ground, while 
new starting quarterback Mark 
Hartsell developed into a strong 
signal caller. This season also 
showed the emergence of kick 
returner Kenyatta Watson as a 
legitimate offensive threat. 

The defense, though, 
was the heart and soul of the 
team. The unit, one of the 
nation's best, was led by senior 
linebacker Stephen Boyd and 
junior defensive end Mike 
Mamula. The entire unit, how- 
ever, fi-om the line to the sec- 
ondary, was extremely solid. 
Punter Jeff Beckley also ma- 
tured into a top punter with his 
booming punts and kickoffs, 
while kicker David Gordon, 
also made some big kicks for 
the team. 

The 1994 Boston Col- 
lege football team had to deal 
with many changes, they still 
saw a great deal of success in 
terms of wins and record break- 
ing achievements. Most of all, 
they established Boston Col- 
lege as a legitimate top twenty- 
five team and began a new era 
of football that instills promise 
for the future. 

Kevin Hodsdon 



Football 179 




Dan Lcvasscur 



Top: Tight 
Bottom: Fr 
Eagles take 



end Pete Mitchell runs with the ball after catching a pass. 
Monan wishes good luck to Coach Dan Henning before the 
on Kansas State in the Aloha Bowl. 



Victory Erupts 

in 

Hawaii 



Ten years ago, there 
was the Miracle in Miami when 
Doug Flutie threw the 'Hail 
Mary' pass to Gerard Phelan. 
Although there was no "miracle" 
this year in EC's loss to the 
University of Miami by a score 
I of 23-7, there were still minor 
victories that were won within 
the game itself. 

Tight end Pete Mitchell 
I broke Kelvin Martin's receiv- 
ing record of 2,337 yards by 
■ catching five passes for 39 yards. 
Defensive end Mike Mamula 
. became the leader in the confer- 

Ience in sacks with 13. Rookie 
quarterback Mark Hartsell 
, passed for over 1 ,000 yards dur- 
■ I ing the regular season. In addi- 
i- * j tion to all of these accolades, the 
. j team earned a spot in the Aloha 
Bowl where it was to take on the 
1 1th ranked Wildcats of Kansas 
State. 

It was Christmas Day 
in Honolulu, Hawaii and the 
Eagles, ranked 25 with a regular 

(season record of 6-4-1, were 
ready to show the '9-2' Wild- 
cats that they were a team to be 
' I taken seriously. The defense was 
i;;^ unstoppable. They racked up 
eight sacks on the first-team Ail- 
American quarterback, Chad 
, .May. 

MOn the offensive side, 
David Green and Justice Smith 
, drove the ball down the field. 
I' Smith scored the first touchdown 
for the Eagles and David 
j Gordon's kick made it 7-0. Once 
Kansas State had scored to tie 



the game, the keen eagle eyes 
kept a watch on its prey, and 
Mamula sacked May when he 
was in the end zone looking for 
a clear pass. This gave BC a two 
point lead from the safety and 
carried them into the second half 
with the ambition to do some 
more damage. 

Damage was done in 
the fourth quarter when Hartsell 
threw to Kenyatta Watson who 
caught the ball on the 3-yard 
line. Due to a penalty for un- 
sportsmanlike conduct for early 
celebration, the ball was brought 
back and placed on the Wild- 
cats' 18-yard line. The Eagles 
finished the bowl game off with 
12-7 victory after David Gor- 
don kicked a 35-yard field goal. 

Mamula received TJ 
Maxx Defensive Player of the 
Game honors and Boston Col- 
lege Player of the Game honors. 
With regard to the team's ef- 
forts, Mamula stated, "We had a 
great scheme and executed it 
really well." David Green re- 
ceived TJ Maxx Offensive 
Player of the Game honors for 
his 28 carries and 121 yards in 
rushing. 

The team ' s Aloha Bowl 
win brought great pride to the 
Heights and proved to the sports- 
crazed world that teamwork, 
ambition, and maroon and gold 
spirit brings dignity and success 
to those who put in an all-out 
effort. 



Deborah McNamara 




Below: Senior Jeff Beckley punts the ball down the field. 

Top right: Inside linebacker Stephen Boyd makes an interception in the 

Aloha Bowl. 

Bottom right: Chris Sullivan, Tim Morabito, and Mike Mamula look on 

from the sidelines. 



& 






•-. f 



f » 



Scoreboard 


Overall Record: 7-4-1 




Michigan 


34-26 


L 


Virginia Tech 


12-7 


L 


Pittsburgh 


21-9 


W 


Notre Dame 


30-11 


W 


Temple 


45-28 


W 


Rutgers 


7-7 


T 


Army 


30-3 


W 


Louisville 


35-14 


W 


Syracuse 


31-0 


w 


West Virginia 


21-20 


L 


Miami 


23-7 


L 


Aloha Bowl vs. 






Kansas State 


12-7 


W 



M,~ 



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182 Football 




Left: Pete Mitchell tries to get by a Virginia 
Tech defenseman. 



Photo: Courtesy of Sports Infonnation 



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Right Page (Top): Meaghan Reilly is 
swinging the ball away from a defender. 
(Middle): A Lady Eagle is moving the ball 
up the field. (Bottom): Teammates relish 
the victory over Syracuse. 
Left Page (Right): The trophy for the BIG 
EAST Champs. (Far Right): Julie Obear 
awaiting her shot. (Below): Big East Title 
brings tears of joy. (Middle): Seniors pose 
forapicture. (Bottom right): Goalie Sarah 
Egnaczyk, MVP of Big East Tournament, 
is ready to defend her goal. 











Front (1 to r): Sarah Egnaczyk, Meaghan Reilly, Julie Obear, Paula Boukavalas, Jennifer Baker, Kristen Fiederlein, Elizabeth Hays. Middle (I to r): 
Keith McCJLskey (Mgr.), Andrea Durko, Robin Rozycki, Collette Hertel, Jessica Sinco, Maura Forbes, Nicki Novocin, Asst. Coach Dave Scully. 
Back (I to r|: Head Coach Sherren Granese, Asst. Coach Jennifer Bouchie, Marion Fitzgerald, Michelle LaBonge, Gabrielle Bieg, Erin McLaughlin 
Alexi Siglin, Rachel Moll, Rebecca Zannini, Nicole Stalula, Heather Leshcr (Trainer), Assl. Coach Brenda Canning. 




Big East Title is 
Captured 



\m In a year when fans 

may marvel at the second, con- 
secutive win over Notre Dame, 
the field hockey team also set 
new standards as it captured its 
first Big East title. The victory 
guaranteed the Lady Eagles 
their first appearance in the 
NCAA tournament. 

I After knocking off ri- 

val UConn in the Big East semi- 
finals, BC went to the finals 
and had to face Syracuse, the 
eleventh seed in the nation. 
Dead even after regulation, two 
fifteen minute overtimes, and 
two shoot-outs, the title came 
down to a third shoot-out in 
which each team had to match 
the other, stroke for stroke. 
With a Syracuse miss, the 
crown was there for BC's tak- 
ing. Sophomore Jessica 
Sinco's crucial shot escaped 
the goalie's reach and sealed 
the victory and the champion- 
ship for Boston College. 

"Our goal was to make 
it to the Big East Tournament. 



If we could accomplish this, 
we wanted to win it," said se- 
nior tri-captain Julie Obear. 

Led by five seniors, 
including captains Jen Baker, 
Paula Boukouvalas, and Julie 
Obear, the team's success was 
greatly helped by the fresh- 
men, whose easy transition 
filled the void left by last year ' s 
graduating seniors. "There is 
no weakness on the team. Any 
girl can come off the bench 
and play effectively," added 
Obear. 

The team's depth was 
tested as they entered the 
NCAA tournament. Their first 
opponent was Northeastern 
who they beat by a score of 3-2. 
This win put them in the Elite 
Eight where they played 
against number one ranked 
North Carolina. Although they 
were beaten by a score of 5-0, 
the "underdog" Lady Eagles 
brought pride to the Heights 
for their outstanding accom- 
plishments. 

Preeti Garde 



^^^^^HmI ' Jk^t* ^ ' -^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ft 


Scoreboard 




Overall Record 15-6-2 




Springfield 


W2-1 


Cornell 


W 2-0 


Massachusetts 


L 0-3 


Rhode Island 


W 1-0 


Michigan State 


T 1-1 


Connecticut 


T O-O(OT) 


Rutgers 


W2-l(OT) 


James Madison 


L 1-2 


Villanova 


W2-1 


Harvard 


W 3-0 


Georgetown 


W3-0 


Holy Cross 


W2-0 


BU 


W 3-2(OT) 


New Hampshire 


L 0-2 


Northeastern 


L 1-2 


Calif. Berkeley 


W2-1 


Providence 


W2-0 


Pacific 


W6-0 


Syracuse 


L 1-2 






BIG EAST Championship vs. Connecticut 


W3-1 


BIG EAST Champ 


lonship vs. Syracuse 


Wl-0 


NCAA Division I Tournament vs. 


Northeastern 


W3-2 


NCAA Elite Eight 


vs. North Caro 


ina 


L 5-0 



Foiling Worthy 

Adversaries, Men 

Take New England 



The fencing team was 
ready to leave its mark on the 
opposition with its promising 
talent and leadership. The 
team was led by captains 
Brooke Henry, Jennifer Wall, 
Joshua Lewis, and John Wood 
and was coached by Syd 
Fadner, James White, and 
Christopher Chute. 

"The men started the 
season with an overall record 
of 4-3. We work to finish in 
the top three of the Northeast 
Fencing Conference," said 
Head Coach Fadner. The 
men's foil squad, led by jun- 
iors Dan Grillo, Dien Nguyen, 
and John Peltonen were 
bound to be difficult compe- 
tition. 

This was shown in 
their capturing of the New 
England title. It was the first 
time that BC ever won this 
championship. Keun Ok fin- 
ished second in the individual 
saber fencing event while 
teammate, Mike Waring, fin- 
ished fourth. In the epee com- 
petition, John Wood finished 



eighth. Dien Nguyen finished 
fourth in the foil competition. 
In talking about the goal of 
winning the New England 
Championship, John Wood 
said, "Having that goal made 
winning all the sweeter." 

Equally tough compe- 
tition was the women's team, 
which Fadner labeled as "the 
strongest women ' s team since 
fencing became a varsity 
sport." The team was led by 
senior Hien Nguyen, last 
year's National Fencing Club 
foil champion. 

In the eight-school 
meet at Wellesley , the women 
won four out of seven compe- 
titions. They beat Varuch (20- 
1 2), Stevenson Tech. (21-11), 
Dartmouth (26-6), and MIT 
(19-13) and only lost to 
Vassar, Brandeis, and 
Wellesley. 

Both the depth and 
dedication of the fencing team 
allowed it to meet success 
throughout its contests of the 
season. 

Preeti Garde 



"[This is] the strongest worn, 
team since fencing became a 
varsity sport. " 

Coach Syd Fadner 

"Having that goal made winning 
all the sweeter, " 




Deborah McNamara 



Top: Senior Hien Nguyen, Head Coach Syd Fadner, and Captain Brooke 

Henry. 

Bottom: En Garde!! 



3J 




:»/ K 



Left to Right: Erin Langley, Mary Keefe, 
Katie Guernsey, Michelle Yap, George, Coach 
Sydney Fadner, Lucy Griesbach, Hien 
Nguyen, Captain Brooke Henry. 



Deborah McNaniara 




Front Row (I to r): Haj Matsukata, 
Doug Duffin, Mike Waring, Dien 
Nguyen, John Peltonen. 
Back Row (I to r) : Kieran Bezila, David 
Kotcher, Peter Mirabella, Mark Samale, 
Bill Dwyer, Michael Pawlick, Dan 
Grillo, Pat O'Reilly, George, Coach 
Sydney Fadner, Captain Joshua Lewis. 



Deborah Mi.Naniara 



Bottom Left: Captain Joshua Lewis 
stands ready as George and Syd look on. 
Bottom Right: Hien Nguyen and 
Michelle Yap practice their lunges. 

Dcbnrah McNaniara 





Right Page (Top): Brendan Ring, Tom Marx, and Nick Niles 
are aiiead of the pack. (Bottom): John Wassenaar is making 
strides in front of Cornell. 

Left Page (Right): Chris Georgules shows the concentration 
and the will to win. (Below): Larry Keating breaks away from 
the competition. 




Stephen J. Anton ik 




Front (I to r): John Wassenaar, Tom Marx, Brendan Ring, Pete Grimes. Back (1 to r): Darren Keenan, Nick Niles, 
Larry Keating, Chris Georgules, Jason Elliot, Keith Shea, Brian Lavelle. 



188 Men's Cross Country 




Focused Attitude 

Leads to a 
Successful Finish 



Success is usually the 
result of many trial-and-en'or 
circumstances from which one 
learns his mistakes. For senior 
co-captain Chris Georgules, 
being part of the men's cross 
country team was no different. 
Taking better care of himself, 
for instance, listening to his 
body more, came about after 
suffering past injuries. 

Concentration was also 
an important lesson for 
Georgules in competition. "I 
have to relax, know where I 
am, and who I'm running 
with." These were a few goals 
to keep in mind during a race. 

The team's attentive- 
ness to the mental aspect of 
running left Head Coach 
Randy Thomas very optimis- 
tic; "This is the most excited 
I've been in all my twelve years 
of coaching." Responsibility 
and the focused attitudes of 
teammates made for a produc- 



tive year, despite its under- 
stated reputation. 

Athletes trained for 11 1 
months out of the year, run- 
ning up to 80 miles a week. 
Nevertheless, Thomas admit- 
ted the team did not get the| 
respect it deserved. 

The team finished third I 
in the Big East Championship, 
and in the ICAAAA Champi- 
onship the men finished third I 
in New England behindl 
Dartmouth and BU. The ac-l 
complishments of JohnI 
Wassenaar and ChrisI 
Georgules were rewarded by I 
qualifying for the NCAA| 
Championship. 

To make up for their I 
lack of public recognition,! 
teammates looked to each otherl 
for encouragement and sup- 
port, adding to the many op- 
portunities present in cross] 
country. 

Jyoti Mahapatral 



Scoreboard 


at VeiTnont 


W 16-47 


at New Hampshire 


W 24-31 


Boston College Invitational 


6th of 20 


National Catholic Championship 


1st of 24 


New England Championship 


3rd of 31 


BIG EAST Championship 


3rd of 10 


ICAAAA Championship 


3rd in New England 



Championship 

Style of 

Running 



NCAA indoor na- 
tionals were expecting the BC 
men's winter track team 
headed by Coach Randy Tho- 
mas because of the depth, 
strength, and determination of 
the runners. Sophomore Mark 
McGehearty was Ail-Ameri- 
can in outdoor track and he, 
along with 1994 indoor AU- 
American Chris Georgules, 
were sure to lead the team to 
the nationals. 

Although losing to 
Harvard in the Harvard Dual 
was a disappointment, the 
team ' s performance in the first 
part of the New England Chal- 
lenge was very rewarding. 
Georgules came in first with a 
4:05 mile. He was also the 
fastest leg in the 4 X 800m 
relay with a time of 1 :53. The 
team's determination was il- 
lustrated as they ran hard and 
seized second place which 
qualified them for the second 
half of the New England Chal- 
lenge. 

At part two of the NE 
Challenge, the men faced 
"powerhouse" Dartmouth, 
Northeastern, and UCONN- 
which took the victory. Jun- 
ior John Wassenaar captured 
the title in the mile with a time 
of 4:18. 

Other major contribu- 
tors to the team included top 



sprinter recruit, freshman Eric 
Shaughnessy who ran the 
400m and 800m. Distance 
medley runners, sophomore 
Darren Keenan, junior Mike 
Burke, middle distance run- 
ner Tom Hunt and Georgules 
all did well as they were try- 
ing to defend their ICAAAA 
championship. Assistant cap- 
tains McGehearty, his brother 
Sean, and Hunt were certainly 
national bound material with 
their determination and run- 
ning ability. 

At the BU Terrier 
Classic, Georgules qualified 
for the NCAA Championship 
for his third place finish in the 
3000 meter run with a time of 
8:02.75, which was also the 
third fastest time in the nation 
this year. Mark McGehearty 
finished second in the 35 
pound throwing event with a 
throw of 62' 8", and Sean 
McGehearty finished third 
with a 61' 9" throw. 

The strong, enthusi- 
astic, goal-achieving team 
could not have done it with- 
out the leadership of senior 
Larry Keating. Up and com- 
ing sophomore Jason Elliott 
stated, "There will definitely 
be a leadership void next 
year." 

Amy Arsenault 





Maria F. Segura 




^Jl" From left to right: Tom Marx, Nick 
^ Niles, Darren Keenan, Chris Georgules, 
J Jolin Wassenaar, Brendan Ring, and Larry 
Keating. 



Men's Winter Track 191 



^ ' » / I 



Right Page (Top): Kerry Lyman and Melissa Supler challenge a 
UCONN runner. (Bottom): Jodi Lake is making strides. 
Left Page (Top Right): Ann Baldelli is maintaining her lead over 
a Providence runner. (Bottom Right) : Kerry Lyman is getting ready 
to pass Georgetown. (Bottom Left): Laura Quedenfeld and Megan 
Gayman are moving up on Pitt. 




Stephen J, Anionik 

Front (1 to r): Laura Quedenfeld, Kim Landry, Angle Graham, Amy Lyman, Darby Rice, Ann 
Baldelli, Renee Gorski, Christine Thibault, Katie White. Back (I to r): Cathy Franey, Kerry 
Lyman, Fran Spalding, Jodi Lake, Caroline Pimbelett, Megan Gayman, Lynn Boksanske, Melissa 
Supler, Sara Mulligan, Coach Randy Thomas. 





Stephen J. Antonik 




192 Women's Cross Country 




Teamwork and 

Concentration on 

the Trail 



Before each meet, the 
Imembers of the women's cross 
I country team had to focus on 
Itwo levels of competition, each 
I dependant on the other. Al- 
though individual performance 
I was important, the team's suc- 
Icess determined the final out- 
Icome of the race. 

"Ultimately, you have 
Ito mix with the team." de- 
scribed senior Melissa Supler. 
During a race, one had to con- 
Icentrate on herself, to visual- 
ize what level she could be at, 
but also understand that her 
abilities contributed to a whole 
Iteam. not one individual. 

This mental balance 
[translated into months of tire- 
less persistence on the part of 
each athlete. Head Coach 
Randy Thomas felt that they 
[■'pushed themselves con- 
stantly" in order to meet indi- 



vidual and shared goals. As a | 
result, the team placed in the 
top ten of each meet through- 
out the season. 

The team finished fifth | 
overall in the EC AC Champi- 
onship and came in second 
behind Providence for Divi- 
sion I. In the NCAA Champi- 
onship, Amy Lyman finished 
45th and Caroline 'Caz' 
Pimbelett finished 120th. 

Success and hard work 
aside, Supler found the rela- 
tionships with teammates in- 
valuable. "You haveafull team I 
to fall back on because every- 
one knows what you are going I 
through." 

But the bottom line to I 
the significant commitment of I 
being involved in a sport was 
desire; for yourself and your | 
team, and to enjoy it. 

Jyoti Mahapatra I 





Scoreboard 


at Vermont 


W 21-40 


vs. New Hampshire and Northeastern 


W 19-44-81 


Boston College Invitational 


3rd of 20 


National Catholic Championship 


2nd of 22 


at University of Michigan Invitational 


8th of 12 


New England Championship 


5th of 28 


BIG EAST Championship 


4th of 10 


ECAC Championship 


2nd in Div. I 

i 



Youth, Talent and 
Depth 



™ 



Once again, the 
i women's winter track team 
proved to be very successful. 
According to Head Coach 
Randy Thomas, "Our team is 
very young, but we are very 
well-rounded and are ready to 
succeed." 

Led by senior co-cap- 
tains Melissa Supler and Kerri 
Lyman, the team boasted ex- 
ceptional depth in long and 
"''■ middle distance, as well as in 
both high and long jumps. The 
roster was made up of 36 fresh- 
men and sophomores out of a 
total of 42, but regardless, the 

I team was very competitive. 
On January 14, they 
. qualified for the final round in 
the New England Champion- 
ship meet, placing 2nd out of 
five in their division. Fresh- 
men Tina Hall and Anya 
■ Maurer won the 55 meter dash 
and high jump respectively. 
Junior Andrea Melton won the 
long jump with freshman Amy 
Stuyniski in second. 



Top middle and long 
distance runners who helped 
carry the team were Supler 
and Lyman, sophomores 
Amy Lyman and Caroline 
Pimbelett, and freshmen Jodie 
Lake and Ann Baldelli. 

The Distance Medley 
Relay Team qualified at the 
Boston University Terrier 
Classic to compete in the 
NCAA Indoor Track and 
Field Championship . The 
team, consisting of Baldelli, 
junior Mary Brody, Amy 
Lyman, and freshman Angle 
Graham, finished first with a 
time of 11:31.90 and broke 
the school record by .22 sec- 
onds. 

The team's goal was 
to place top 3, possibly top 2 
in New England this season. 
Thomas stated, "Our depth 
has proven to be the key ele- 
ment. Although we are 
young, we are very talented 
and look forward to a reward- 
ing season." 

Mistie Psaledas 



''Our team is very young, but we 
are very well-rounded and are 
ready to succeed. '' 

Coach Randy Thomas 




Right Page (Top): Andrea 
Melton is at the top of a 
stunt. (Bottom): Gina Perry 
balances in a split three 
people high. 

Left Page (Top Right): 
Amber Trudel pumps up the 
crowd at the top of apyramid. 
(Top Left): Georgette 
Germain shows some BC 
spirit. (OUCH!) (Bottom): 
Greg, Rob, Joe, Keith, and 
Jim do some pre-game 
cheering. 



196 





Inspiration from 
the Sidelines 



Their job was to bal- 
ance in a split three-people- 
high, then free fall to the 
ground. It had to look sponta- 
neous, easy, and fun. The per- 
fect people for the job were 
none other than the varsity 
cheerleaders. 

From pep rallies at 
O'Neill Plaza, to Midnight 
Madness, to game days, these 
seven guys and seven girls 
were dedicated to one goal- to 
pump up the crowd! There was 
never a game when the stands 
were not alive with maroon 
and gold pom-pons and eagle 
chants. 

It is no surprise that 
the cheerleaders had a prac- 
tice schedule comparable to 
any other varsity sport. Those 
gravity-defying basket tosses 
and he-man style stunts took a 
lot of time and hard work to 
perfect. However, there was 
more to this team's behind- 
the-scenes activities than just 
practice. 



Many of the cheerlead- 
ers coached local high school 
teams and/or instructed in clin- 
ics. Some were staff members 
of the National Cheerleaders 
Association which sponsors 
summer camps and workshops 
nationwide. The whole team 
perfoiTned in outside exhibi- 
tions and held clinics for chil- 
dren here at BC. 

As one fan put it, "I 
have always appreciated the 
role the Cheerleaders play at 
the football games. I now have 
an added respect for them af- 
ter watching them with all 
those children. I commend 
them for their hard work, en- 
thusiasm and patience." 

So when some danger, 
excitement, and spirit were 
called for, the cheerleaders 
rolled it all into one dazzling 
show. Mary Singer, their fac- 
ulty advisor, was right in say- 
ing, "The whole group is a 
tribute to BC!" 

Beverly Mather 



Coming Together 
as a Team 



"We are a puzzle, and 
now, most of the pieces are 
together." This was how Head 
Coach Nadine Lilavois de- 
scribed the 1994 Women's 
Volleyball Team. "We are not 
too far away from having good 
chemistry between the play- 
ers," Lilavois continued. 

Facing tough obstacles 
at the beginning of the season, 
having only six healthy play- 
ers, the other four prone to 
injuries and sickness, the team 
lost to Drexel, but left "feeling 
good" despite the situation. 
Shortly after, the team rallied 
together and beat Colgate and 
Army, two teams they had lost 
to the previous year. Accord- 
ing to Lilavois, "We were in 
total control of the match. ..We 
completely destroyed them." 

Led by senior captains 
Jeannette Gaehwiler and 
Melody Douglas, the team had 
an extremely successful sea- 



son compared to previous 
ones. Gaehwiler, the only 
waUc-on to have survived the 
program for three years, was 
named to the All-Tournament 
Team and Athlete of the Week 
by BC this season. According 
to Lilavois, "She's earned ev- 
erything ... This is volleyball ' s 
way of saying 'thank you' to 
her." Lilavois also praised 
sophomore Deanna Hermen 
"whose spirit has led the team | 
on and off the court." 

Overall, Lilavois was I 
very pleased with the team's 
accomplishments. Their main 
goal was to finish with a .500 
Big East record. Despite the | 
health problems at the begin- 
ning of the season, the team I 
definitely came to together to | 
produce one of the most suc- 
cessful seasons in years. 

Mistie Psaledas I 




We are a puzzle, and now, 
most of the pieces are together. 



Nadine Lilavois 



ranimRflTl 




Left Page (Top): A Lady Eagle spikes 
the ball to St. John's. (Bottom): BC 
makes an effort to score against their 
ready opponents. 

Right Page (Above): Celebration is 
called for after scoring a point. 
(Left): BC blocks the shot from St. 
John's. 



/ 



J-l1 



Women's Volleyball 199 



Right Page (Top): Midfielder Paul Keegan 
makes his way down the field. (Bottom): 
An Eagle fights for possession of the ball. 
Left Page (Top): Members of the team 
hope that the ball will go through the hands 
of BU's goalie. (Middle Right): Dan 
Atanasov challenges his opponents with 
his footwork. (Middle Left): Tim Lavin 
attempts to gain control of the ball. 






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200 Men's Soccer 



Front (I to r): Kimani Robinson, Sean Yokota, Paulo Jorge Neves, Will Crowley, Daryl Gioffre. Middle 
(I to r): Anthony Buckley, Rob Schweizer, Keiron O'Brien, Paul Johnston, Paul Keegan, Marius Lund. 
Back (1 to r): Head Coach Ed Kelly, Carlos Casas, Tim Lavin, Marc Bala, Chris Bauer, Brian Siracusa, 
Dan Atanasov, Assistant Coach Brian Ainscough. 




Overcoming 

Tough 

Obstacles 



With a season that can 
only be described, at first, by 
Head Coach Ed Kelly as "frus- 
trating," the BC soccer team 
had faced and had overcome 
many tough obstacles. Accord- 
ing to Kelly, "The team slowly 
crept back into the season," 
despite the many injuries in- 
hibiting the players. 

The season began with 
four losses to James 
Madison, Richmond, 
Georgetown and Boston Uni- 
versity. According to Kelly. 
Georgetown was an especially 
disappointing loss because 
"we lacked common sense and 
gave up silly goals." At one 
point in the season, the start- 
ing team consisted of six walk- 
ons because of unplanned in- 
juries. Yet, the team went on 
to win its next game over Hart- 
ford, tie St. John's, and net a 
5-1 win over Pittsburgh. 

Their experienced and 
well-rounded roster was made 
up of junior co-captains Mark 
Bala and Paul Keegan who, 
according to Kelly, were "fan- 
tastic!" As goal keeper, Bala 
was a great asset to the team. 



He started six of the first eight 
games of the season and shut | 
out St. John's with 12 saves. 
As midfielder, Keegan was an I 
Ail-American and the leading 
scorer of the 1993 season, and 
again proved himself to be a 
majorpartof theteam. Keegan 
agreed with Coach Kelly that 
the team had a frustrating start, 
but they began to come to-| 
gether as a team. Keegan said, 
"Our 3-1 win over Seton Hall, I 
who was ranked 19th in the 
Big East, was very important." 

Kelly also gave much 
credit to senior backs Rob| 
Schweizer and Carlos Casas, 
to senior forward Brian I 
Siracusa and to sophomore 
goal keeper Chris Bauer. He 
stated, "They were a major 
part of the team...! don't know 
what we would have done 
without them. Schweizer has 
become a very strong leader." 

Despite the rough start, 
the Eagles managed to over- 
come many obstacles and end 
with a successful season. 

Mistie Psaledas 



Scoreboard 



Overall Record 7-6-3 



Opponent 
James Madison 
Richmond 
Georgetown 
Boston U. 
Hartford 
St. John's 
Pittsburgh 
Northeastern 



Score 
L 0-2 
L 2-4 
L 1-3 
L 1-2 
W2-1 
T 0-0 
W5-1 
W 1-0 



Opponent 

Dartmouth 

Syracuse 

Harvard 

Seton Hall 

Connecticut 

Villanova 

Holy Cross 

Providence 



Score 
L 0-1 
W2-0 
T 0-0 
W3-1 
L 1-2 
W3-2 
T 1-1 
W 1-0 



Intensity and 

Commitment Has 

Its Rewards 



"Total team commit- 
ment" and "intensity" were two 
key phrases for the Boston 
College women's soccer team 
during the 1994 season. The 
team was coached by Terez 
Biancardi, who was assisted 
by Rob Blanck. Senior cap- 
tains Mary Byrne, Cara Grif- 
fin, and Kathleen McMahon 
did a great job of leading the 
team through an exciting sea- 
son. 

Coach Biancardi said, 
"The preseason was an ex- 
tremely important building 
time for the team." They were 
in fantastic physical condition, 
full of commitment, and eager 
to compete. In addition, they 
were ranked twentieth in the 
country before the season be- 
gan. 

The team demonstrated 
its winning ability by beating 
Fairfield University and tying 
Cornell University to become 
co-champions with Harvard in 
the 1 994 Harvard Invitational 
Tournament. The team played 
very well, and several indi- 



vidual players received spe- 
cial accolades. Goalie Karenl 
Devoe was honored with "Alll 
Tournament Goalie," Deidre| 
Byrnes received "All Tourna- 
ment Point Leader," and Jen-I 
nifer Kelly was named Boston! 
College's "Most Valuable| 
Player" for the weekend. 

On their road trip to| 
New York, the coach nick- 
named the players "her car- 1 
diac kids." Both games wenti 
into overtime, yet the Lady I 
Eagles were able to pull| 
through and defeat the oppo- 
nent with an onslaught of goals. 

The regular season! 
ended on a positive note with a I 
huge win over the University I 
of Rhode Island. Everyone 
was able to play and many 
different people contributed to I 
the team effort and scored I 
goals. 

The Lady Eagles fin- 
ished off the season on a high I 
note by finishing second in the | 
Big East Tournament. 

Lara Farrell I 



Scoreboard 



Overall Record 10-8-1 



Opponent 


Score 


Massachusetts 


L 0-2 


Army 


W2-1 


Villanova 


W5-1 


Hartford 


L 0-5 


Florida Int'l 


Wl-0 


Florida Atlantic 


W6-1 


Connecticut 


L 1-2 


Seton Hall 


Cancelled 


Harvard 


L 0-2 



Opponent 


Score 


Cornell 


T 2-2 (OT) 


Providence 


W2-1 


Dartmouth 


L 0-3 


Rutgers 


W4-1 (OT) 


St. John's 


W 4-2 (OT) 


New Hampshire 


L 0-1 (OT) 


Brown 


L 0-1 


Rhode Island 


W6-0 


lip vs. Providence 


W 1-0 


hip vs. St. John's 


L 0-1 





Left Page (Top): Kara Nance keeps the ball away from 
her opponent. (Bottom): Deidre Byrnes shows a quick 
and aggressive style of play. 

Right Page (Left): Cara Griffin displays determination 
and speed. (Top Right): Katie McMahon beats her 
opponent to the ball. (Middle): Kendra Molina saves 
the ball from going into the goal. (Bottom): The four 
seniors on the team-Cara Griffin, Mary Byrne, Katie 
McMahon, and Kendra Molina. 



( Pholo: Courtesy of Sports Informalion 

iFront n to r): Kendra Molina, Mary Byrne, Katie McMahon, Cara Griffin, Allison David. 

Middle (I to r): Valerie Daniel, Jessica David, Melissa Wolf, Kristina Szczepanski, Lara 
jFarrell, Karen DeVoe. Back (1 to r): Head Coach Terez Biancardi, Kara Nance, Anne 
[Schneider, Jennifer Kelley, Darlene Sliva, Deidre Byrnes, April Parker, Erin Homey, Alex 

Chamberlain, Assistant Coach Rob Blanck, Jessica Morris (trainer). 




Women's Soccer 203 



Setting Sail for a 

National 
Championship 



The tides began to turn 
for BC s sailing program. This 
varsity co-ed sport became 
well established nationally as 
a division A team. During the 
fall of 1 994, both the off-shore 
and dinghy teams shared suc- 
cess. The experience of up- 
perclassmen sailors, coupled 
with the highly regarded fresh- 
man class, provided the right 
combination to win key re- 
gattas this fall. 

"The off-shore racing 
team has grown in strength 
and has gained national rec- 
ognition," said sophomore 
sailor William Rich. They 
competed in the McMillan 
Cup Regatta for the East Coast 
regional finals. There they 
qualified for the spring's 
Kennedy Cup Regatta, the 
oldest inter-collegiate race 
and national off-shore cham- 
pionship. 



The dinghy team 
brought back three trophies, 
the Smith, Sharp, and Dixie 
Cups. The team also finished 
a strong second in the Oberg 
Cup, also known as the 
"Beanpot" in sailing for Bos- 
ton schools. It is the biggest 
regatta in the Boston area. To 
cap off the season, the fresh- 
man team went to the Atlantic 
Coast Finals in Charleston, 
South Carolina. Because of 
BC's exceptional team, the 
Eagles were chosen to repre- 
sent the New England area in 
the race. 

The team hopes to add 
to their success and expects to 
bring in more top new recruits . 
According to head coach 
Norman Reid, "Freshmen had 
the best recruiting class in BC 
history and in the Northeast, 
and we are working towards 
having a national champion- 
ship team." 

Robert F. Massimi 



The off-shore racing team 



IfJImiMKUMA 



gained national recognition. ' 

Will Rich 



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Photo: Courtesy of Sailing Team 




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Photo: Courtesy of Sailini: Team 




Front (1 to r): Allison McEnemey, Tobin Tornehl, Anne Bohlen, 
Chris Murray, Nicolas Mounier, Dejana Perrone, Jenny Rovegno. 
Middle (1 to r): Coach Norman Reid, Cristina de la Sola, Michelle 
Ashton, Sarah Skeie, Noah Doolittle, Suzie Milbauer, Barney Walker, 
Liz Connolly, Robin Raniero. 

Back (1 to r): Ted Grayson, Adam Van Ness, Chris Gill, Will Rich, 
Ivy Johnson. 



Diving Deep 

with 
Determination 



Although the women's 
[diving team only consisted of 
five members, it showed a great 
deal of spirit and determination. 
Junior Melissa McNamara, 
freshman Melanie Sabo, and 
freshman Laura Deschenes were 
the three starters who helped 
contribute points to the swim 
1 team's overall score. 

As part of the swim 
I team, the diving team competes 
in two events, the 1 meter spring- 
board and the 3 meter spring- 
board. All of the points which 
the divers earn are added to the 
total number of team points. 



Some of the highlights of 
the season included traveling to 
Miami where the team competed 
against Florida Atlantic and the 
University of Miami. Diving well 
against UNH proved to be a chal- 
lenge the team could overcome. 
In addition, Sabo and Deschenes 
did well in the New England 
Championships. 

McNamara pointed out 
that part of the team's success 
and desire to do well came from 
Head Coach Andrew Beaudry. 
She said, "He works hard and is 
always there for us. He is fun 
and hysterical, and he makes 
diving that much more enjoy- 
able." 



" [Coach Beaudry] works hard 
and is always therefor us. " 

Melissa McNamara 



en's DiA 



Fostering 
a Sense of 
Closeness 



As the end of senior 
co-captain John Webber' s col- 
legiate swimming career ap- 
proached, he looked back to 
his first year on the men's team 
to guide him through his final 
year. "The older athletes took 
me under their wing", Webber 
remembered, as he tried to do 
the same for his teammates 
this year through leadership. 
"What goes around comes 
around," said Webber, who 
u sed what he learned as a fresh- 
man to keep the team moti- 
vated throughout the season. 

Head Coach Tom 
Gruvin, on the other hand, kept 
balance in mind when it came 
to his athletes. He felt that time 
spent on academics versus ath- 
letics varied for each indi- 
vidual, and a "juggling act be- 



tween what you ask for and 
what you get" constantly in- 
fluenced the team. Neverthe- 
less, Gruvin allowed as much 
flexibility as possible for the 
athletes' schoolwork. 

Swimmers also fo- 
cused on having fun with their 
team. "You can't sit in a pool 
for three hours a day without a 
good sense of humor," said 
Webber. Closeness between 
teammates as well as with the 
women's team grew as aresuh 
of social activities such as spa- 
ghetti dinners and dances. 
Having so many friends on the 
team gave everyone something 
to look forward to at practice 
and offered support at meets. 

Jyoti Mahapatra 



'You cant sit in a pool for three 
hours a day without a good sense 
of humor. '' 

John Webber 





^■- 





HteA^^^^i 



.*(#»■¥" 




208 



^ ..^ 




PcTe^lanis 




Gliding Through 
the Water as One 



It took 23 years, but 
Head Coach Tom Gruvin has 
finally been reacquainted with 
one of his past athletes. Assis- 
tant Coach Mary Kay Samko. 
She was a member of the first 
women's swim team led by 
Gruvin, who began the pro- 
gram and has been coaching 
ever since. 

With only two losing 
seasons, "Swimming is prob- 
ably the most successful 
women's sport at BC," stated 
Gruvin. Victory did not come 
easy. Many teammates trav- 
eled out of state as far as Florida 
to compete . Whether or not the 
outcome was as expected, such 
an extensive time commitment 
gave team members the chance 
to learn from each other. 



Senior co-captain 
Katelyn Lindstrom felt that the 
freshmen were "a strong help 
to the whole team," encourag- 
ing upperclassmen to train 
harder and push themselves 
towards excellence. Likewise, 
the new teammates looked to 
the experience of returning 
swimmers for guidance. 

Lindstrom, who raced 
in the 1500-meter breastroke 
and sprint freestyle, believed 
attitude more than anything 
contributed to success. She 
stated, "The difference be- 
tween a good race and great 
race is knowing you can do it. 
along with continuous prac- 
tice." 

Jyoti Mahapatra 



"The dijference between a good 
race and a great race is knowing 
you can do it... '' 



Katelyn Lindstrom 



The Will to Win 

and the Leadership 

to Succeed 



With nine returning 
starters for the 1994-95 sea- 
son, the wrestUng team had a 
great deal of experience and 
leadership. Under the guidance 
of senior co-captain Jim 
Gallagher, who placed 3rd in 
the New England Champion- 
ships last year, junior co-cap- 
tain Mike Odiotti, who over- 
came a broken hand, and jun- 
ior Ron Minutello, who also 
placed third in New England ' s 
last year, the team was able to 
begin the season with enthusi- 
asm and strength. 

Losing to Manhattan 
and Hofstra on November 27 

I proved to be a disappointing 
loss because the competition 
was so close. According to 

I junior Eric Knudsen, "Despite 
these early losses, we had to 
focus on the competitions be- 
tween Seton Hall and BU, 
mostly the Big East teams." 



Rod Buttry, who en- 
tered his ninth year as Head 
Coach this season at BC, 
stated, "This year our compe- 
tition level had gone up, but 
we were even stronger than 
ever as a team. Gallagher and 
Odiotti were leading the team 
well as captains." Buttry also 
praised wrestlers Michael 
Colleran, Jim Chidiac, and 
Emerson Wickwire. "We did 
especially well at the E. 
Stroudsburg Tournament. We 
were wrestling against tough 
teams such as Penn State." 
Buttry also emphasized that 
each individual match was 
important with no particular 
importance to one. "We just 
want to get out there and win." 

Overall, the wrestling 
team had a successful season 
and were expected to place 
third in the Big East Confer- 
ence. 

MisliL l\akdas 



!fc> "^^ '^ 



'We just want to get out there 
and win. " 



Coach Rod Buttry 





Left Page (Top): Emerson Wickwire is in 
position to wrestle a Seton Hall Pirate. 
(Bottom): The three seniors on the team- 
Emerson Wickwire, Jim Gallagher, and 
Jim Chidiac. 

Right Page (Top): BC wrestler grapples 
with opponent. (Middle): A BC Eagle 
fights his way out of a headlock. 



Front (I to r): Asst. Coach Mike Alvarez, Selh Blee, Gary MacDonald, Luke Renjilian-Burgy, Mike Colleran, Alex 
Tsianatelis, Capt. Jim Gallagher, Jeff Gibbon,s, Capt. Mike Odiotti. Back (I to r): Asst. Coach Steve Biondollillo, 
Emerson Wickwire, Eric Knudsen, Peter Foley, Peter Folan. Ron Minutello, Jim Chidiac, Mike Flynn, Chris 
Fitzgerald, Scott Coccaro. Eugene Swanzey, Coach Rod Buttry. 



Eagles 

Play 

Up to Par 



The men's golf team, 
for the most part, played in- 
consistently. However, they 
still managed to end up sixth 
in New England. The team 
was led by senior captain Scott 
Farrell and coached by Peter 
Bigham who won the award 
for Outstanding New Coach 
of the Year. 

One of the major high- 
lights of the season came when 
junior Stephen Shunk won the 
Yale Intercollegiate Golf 
Tournament. It was a three- 
day event in which Shunk 
broke a fifty year-old record 
by achieving a score of 208. 

Those who were the 
starting five on the team were 
Farrell, and juniors Matthew 
Stanchek, Shane Dooley, Jim 




O'Donnell, and Shunk. Con- 
tributions were also made by 
senior Kevin McKeon. Se- 
nior Jay Ketchen and the two 
newcomers on the team, se- 
niors Pat Carney and Marc 
Soucy acted as inspirational 
"band leaders" for the team. 

Farrell was a very 
consistent player and tried to 
take the freshmen and less 
experienced players under his 
wings. He tried to help them 
successfully balance academ- 
ics and athletics. 

The skill, natural abil- 
ity, and positive attitude of 
the golfers helped them get 
geared up for the NCAA East 
Regional Golf Championship 
held in Arizona. 

Deborah McNamara 



Scoreboard 




i 


UCONN Invitational 




10th of 16 


) 


(Willimantic, Connecticut) 








Yale Invitational 




nth of 32 




(New Haven, Connecticut) 








BIG EAST Championship 




6th of 7 




(Potomac, Maryland) 








Toski Invitational 




7th of 22 




(Amherst, Massachusetts) 








ECAC Qualifier 




3rd of 21 




ECAC Championship 




11th of 20 






From left to right: 

Stephen Shunk, Scott Farrell, 
Matt Stanchek, and Kevin 
McKeon 





Front Row (I to r): Claudine Pietrucha, Beckie Duvall, Meaghen O'Neill, Co-captain Tracey LaBossiere, Erin Tullock, Co-captain Sue 
Compson, Kathleen Garvin, Kate Antes, Kristin Gray. 

Back Row (I to r): Assistant Coach Paul Melvin, Tobin Dominick, Sarah Kearl, Meredith Stella, Liz Dawson, Karen Emma, Laura Traynham, 
Ryan MacLeod, Heather Daqui, Amy Chase, Heidi Anderson, Head Coach Tom O'Malley. 



214 Women's Hockey 







/ 



Shawn T. Mead 



Blades of Talent 

and Skill 

on the Ice 




"Everyone contributes 
in their own way. We win as a 
team and we lose as a team." 
These were the words of jun- 
ior goal tender Kristen Gray as 
she described the women's 
hockey team. Led by senior 
co-captains Tracey LaBossiere 
and Sue Compson, the team 
had a great year of competi- 
tion. 

Under the direction of 
Head Coach Tom O'Malley 
and Assistant Coach Paul 
Melvin, the women worked 
hard and played well despite 
the talents of their highly 
ranked opponents. They beat 
Maine, RPI, Wesleyan, 
Colgate twice, and upset St. 
Lawrence by a score of 6-5. 
LaBossiere scored with less 
than two minutes left to give 
the Lady Eagles a 4-3 victory 
over Bowdoin. 

Although they lost by 
a score of 2-1 to Providence, 
which was ranked third in the 
nation, the women showed that 
they could play the tough teams 
because as Coach O'Malley 
said, "They were able to rise to 
the occasion and play their 
hearts out." 



With regard to Coach 
O'Malley, Compson stated, 
"He has done a great job in 
getting us this far. He puts so 
much time and energy into 
the team and has really made 
the team what it is." 

Hard work and high 
scoring ability paid off for 
senior forward Kate Antos as 
she was named East Coast 
Athletic Conference Player 
of the Week. Along with 
Antos and LaBossiere, 
sophomores Karen Emma 
and Laura Traynam made key 
contributions to their second 
win over Bowdoin in the sea- 
son by a score of 6-3. All of 
the players provided the nec- 
essary aggressive skills on 
both the offensive and defen- 
sive ends of the game. 

In general, the team 
faced a difficult schedule as a 
first year Division I ECAC 
Varsity team. Yet in each 
game, the players accom- 
plished new goals and learned 
more about winning and tak- 
ing control. 



Deborah McNamara 



''They were able to rise to the 
occasion and play their hearts 



out. 



Coach Tom O'Malley 



Perseverence Lends 

Strength to Men's 

Hockey 



Beginning in October and 
continuing until March, senior 
Mike McCartiiy literally ate, slept, 
and thought of hockey practically 
twenty-four hours a day. From 
pre-game dinners and 7 a.m. 
breakfasts to daily workouts, be- 
ing a member of the men ' s hockey 
team translated into an intense 
season requiring months of dedi- 
cation. 

"Banging up on your own 
guys," reminded McCarthy, was 
also a consistent part of building 
up the young defensive team. 
Aside from being such a physical 
sport, hockey also required con- 
centration of an "individual game 
concept," said senior Jerry 
Buckley, a co-captain along with 
senior Ryan Haggerty. 

Head Coach Jerry York 
was credited for much of the 
team's spirit and enthusiasm. 
While only in the position for one 
year at BC, York made an impact 
on Haggerty 's experience as an 
athlete; "I've learned more from 
him this year than in my other 
three years combined." 

Commended for both 
knowing the game and having 
reasonable expectations of the 
team, York was described by 
McCarthy as "a mentor and a 
friend." 

The team experienced 
some ups and downs during the 
season. However, they used their 
back-to-back wins against Provi- 
dence; 5-4, 7-5, as inspiration to 
fight back and beat their future 



opponents such as UMASS- 
Lowell by a score of 7-3. 

With the leadership from 
the six seniors-McCarthy, 
Buckley, Rob Canavan, Jimmy 
Krayer, Josh Singewald, and Rob 
Laferriere and the outstanding 
goal keeping talent of sophomore 
Greg Taylor, the men stuck to- 
gether as one unit and never 
stopped trying to be the best. 

In an attempt to defend 
their 1994 Beanpot victory, the 
team took the first game of this 
year's Beanpot by a score of 7-6 
against the Harvard Crimson. 
Although BC was in the lead by a 
score of 4-0 due to goals by 
McCarthy, Haggerty, Peter Mas- 
ters, and Brian Callahan, the 
Crimson came back and scored 
three goals in the second period. 
The score was 5-3 after Callahan 
scored another goal. Don Chase 
and David Hymovitz put two 
more away for BC in order to 
keep up with Harvard's goal- 
matching display. 

The team went on to the 
championship game to play the 
BU Terriers in the last Beanpot at 
the Boston Garden. Although 
BC lost by a score of 5-1, they 
displayed a great deal of heart 
playing against the very talented 
BU team. 

A sport that would not 
tolerate neither hesitance nor pas- 
sivity, men's hockey proved to 
be a challenge met only with de- 
votion and a sincere enjoyment 
of the game. 

Jyoti Mahapatra 



)atra I 





Front (I to r): Head Coach Jerry York, Josh Singewald. Jim Krayer. Rob Laferriere, Co-Captain Jerry Buckley, Co-Captain Ryan Haggerty, 
Michael McCarthy, Rob Canavan, Greg Taylor, Assoc. Head Coach Jim Logue. Middle (1 to r): Strength & Conditioning Coach Jeixy Palmieri, 
Asst. Coach Barry Pederson, Tom Ashe, Don Chase, Peter Masters, Greg Callahan, Brad Carlson, Ryan Taylor, David Hymovitz, Clifton 
McHale, Asst. Coach Scott Paluch, Trainer Steve Basiel. Back (1 to r): Equipment Manager John Hegarty, Manager Peter Kenn, Timmy Lewis, 
Luke Howarth, Toby Harris, David Wainwright, Ken Heraenway, Brian Callahan, Jamie O'Leary, Joe Harney, Mike Correia, Manager David 

^""^^^"- Men's Hockey 217 




Above: Coach Jerry York talks to the 

team during a time-out. 

Right: Senior forward Mike McCarthy 

moves the puck down the ice. 

Right Page (Top): Senior co-captain 

Ryan Haggerty scores a goal against 

UMASS. 

Bottom Left: Tom Ashe, Ryan Haggerty, 

Jerry Buckley, and Joe Harney celebrate 

after scoring. 

Bottom Right: Juniorforward Don Chase 

in a face-off against UMASS. 



218 Men's Hockey 



1 



%. 






,.-2k 



•*'-^ 

^^^*:^ 



\lM$i^tlifiwtiA^' 



'"■-■^ 





Shawn T. Mead 

1 Left Page: Sophomore defenseman David Wainwright looks 

i- to pass the puck to a fellow Eagle. 

i Above: Junior forward David Hymovitz keeps Maine from 
getting the puck. 

Left: Sophomore goalie Greg Taylor blocks Maine 's shot on 
goal as Ken Hemenway and Tom Ashe look on. 



Men's Hockey 221 




Above: Senior forward Rob 

Laferriere tries to beat out 

Northeastern for possession. 

Far Right: David Wainwright moves 

the puck down the ice in a game 

against Maine. 

Right: Senior goalie Josh Singewald 

is ready to block the shot from 

Northeastern. 



222 Men's Hockey 





Men's Hockey 223 



Persistence 

Through a Season 

of Challenges 



The men's basketball 

[team started the year with a 
remarkable 6-2 record, but ran 
into some difficulty mid-sea- 
son with eight consecutive 

[losses. 

During winter-break, 

jthe Eagles won an important 
game against the University of 
Hartford 83-78 in overtime. 
Sophomore Danya Abrams 

I had 41 points for a career high. 
Although this season 

I marked EC's longest losing 
streak since 1 990-9 1 , the team 
was led by some outstanding 

' players. Senior captains Marc 
Molinsky and Kevin 
Hrobowski both added key 
three-pointers and showed tre- 
mendous effort against the 
Miami Hurricanes. Abrams, 
the BIG EAST leading scorer, 
also contributed 18 points 

I during the game. 

Against Seton Hall, the 

I Eagles seemed to play well, 
but with point guard Duane 
Woodward sidelined with an 
ankle injury, the team ran into 

I trouble. 

The team's first Big 

I East victory came against Pitts- 
burgh with a score of 74-69. 



Molinsky racked up 23 points 
and was 5 for 10 from 3-point 
range. Although BC was down 
by a score of 33-27 at half- 
time, the Eagles rallied to take 
a44-43 lead with 14:01 left on 
the clock. Offensive rebounds 
and key free throws from 
Abrams, Molinsky and fresh- 
man guard Duane Woodward 
turned out to be the major fac- 
tors in this last minute win. 
This gave the team inspiration 
for future games. 

Head Coach Jim 
O'Brien stated, "Basically, we 
knew that we were going to 
have an up and down season 
from the beginning. We lost 
our four main seniors, so the 
nucleus of the team was young- 
mostly freshmen and sopho- 
mores. This season we needed 
to take a step backward in or- 
der to jump ahead two steps 
next year." 

Although the Eagles * 
and Coach O'Brien had suf- 
fered these losses, they met 
each new game with commit- ^ 
ment and hope and always 
anticipated another win. 

Mistie Psaledas 



"This season we needed to take a 
step backward in order to jump 
ahead two steps next year. '' 



Coach O'Brien, 





I Bf Spoils liil.i 



Front Row (1 to r): Manager Alicia Maderazo, Jim Ryan. Chris Herren. Captain Marc Molinsky, Captain Danya Abrams. Captain Kevin Hrobowski, 
Antonio Granger. Duane Woodward. Manager Mary Kay Waldron. 

Back Row (1 to r): Manager Sean McDonnell, Administrative Assistant Tom Devitt, Manager Larry Hare, Brad Christianson, Bevan Thomas, Mike 
Piwerka. Paul Grant. Head Coach Jim O'Brien. Mickey Curley. Robert Blackwell. Jr.. Keenan Jourdan. Assistant Coach Dave Spiller, Assistant 
2oach Paul Biancardi, Associate Head Coach Rick Boyages. 





Peter Manis 

Curley slams another '2' home. 



A Syracuse player goes down trying to stop Keenan Jourdan from making a lay up. 



226 Men's Basketball 




Left Page: Sophomore Captain 
Danya Abrams proved to be 
strong force for the hoop team. 
Right Page (Left):Freshman 
guard Duane Woodward makes 
his way down the court. (Right): 
Kevin Hrobowski goes up for 
the shot. (Bottom): Bevan 
Thomas dribbles past the 
UCONN defense. 



229 Men's Basketball 




Photo: CourlL'sv dI BC Spuils liilorniation 



Front Row (1 to r): Aimee McGuire, Toya Squair, Co-Captain Lori Kasten, Co-Captain Joanie Gallagher, Kim Beezer, Angela Crowder. 

Back Row (1 to r): Head Coach Cathy Inglese, Asst. Coach MaryBeth Tobin, Teri McCormick, Holly Porter, Kinzer Cohen, Cindy O'Connor, Cecilee 

Campbell, Audrey Bowersox, Jennifer Passonno, Student Coach Tia Manhardt, Assistant Coach Robin Wright, Assistant Coach Keith Cieplicki. 




Women's Basketball 
Rebounds 
Obstacles 



Despite setbacks, the 
women's basketball team had es- 
tablished themselves as a strong, 
persistent force that would not 
take obstacles sitting down. With 
senior Tia Manhardt and senior 
co-captain Lori Kasten out for the 
majority of the season due to knee 
surgery, senior co-captain Joanie 
Gallagher and the remaining up- 
perclassmen added leadership to 
their responsibilities while 
younger athletes focused on build- 
ing experience. 

Playing against UCONN, 
the top-ranked NCAA women's 
basketball team, gave the BC 
women much from which to learn 
and take pride. The game's in- 
tense pace kept the team battling 
until the last seconds. Knowing 
UCONN 's reputation ignited the 
players to a level of competition 
not often seen, but exciting nev- 
ertheless. 

Manhardt reflected on the 
optimistic side of their loss, say- 
ing, "It was great just to play them 
and see one of the best teams in 
the country in action." 



Head Coach Cathy 
higlese held similar views, re- 
minding everyone of the value of 
mistakes, and how players were 
learning through their losses. 
Faced with numerous highly 
competitive opponents , Inglese ' s 
motto was consistently replayed 
in each athlete's mind; "always 
strive to do better." 

Concentrating on the 
positive aspects of the team fu- 
eled even further benefits. The 
upset against Seton Hall was 
taken for granted by no one. Per- 
severance surged as the young 
team of mostly freshmen and 
sophomores converged their ef- 
forts into learning the game bet- 
ter. Endurance became a recog- 
nizable trait, rising after each 
practice. 

Manhardt concluded 
what all the players had learned 
during the season, "It isn't so 
much talent that you need, but 



diligence." 



Jyoti Mahapatra 



Motto of Coach Inglese 




234 



Above: Freshman guard Kim Beezer tries to steal the ball from a Seton Hall opponent. 

Right Page (Top Left): Freshman center Cindy O'Connor at the free throw line. Top Right: Junior Cecilee Campbell fights for the ball. 
Bottom Left: Junior forward Angela Crowder jumps to catch a pass. Bottom Right: The team celebrates after their big win over Seton 
Hall. 
Women's Basketball 




Women's Basketball 235 




SkpliLii J. Antonik 

Right Page (Top); Looks like a close play at first base. 
(Middle): Mark Bettencourt is on the mound. 
(Bottom): Mike Martin awaits his pitch at the Beanpot 
game at Fenway. 

Left Page (Top): Eagles celebrate after scoring a run. 
(Bottom): Sliding head first into home plate. 



236 Baseball 



\ 




Unity on the 
Diamond 



The '94 Baseball sea- 
son kicked off to a promising 
start with wins in the first 
three games. Although the 
entire season did not hold to 
that precedent, it did not dull 
the talent of the players nor 
the constant team spirit. 

One after another the 
players proved themselves to 
be exceptional. Senior cap- 
tain Mike Martin had a ter- 
rific season at second base, 
earning himself an All- 
American title and a place on 
the Detroit Tigers. 

Other outstanding 
performances were put in by 
the five '95 seniors, four of 
whom had been playing since 
their freshman year. Co-cap- 
tain Mark Bettencourt and 
Curt Romboli, both of whom 
had been starting pitchers 
since their first year, gave 
excellent performances. 
Bettencourt won Pitcher of 
the Week in the unexpected 
first Big East win against 
Seton Hall, and Romboli 
pitched a two-hitter against 
Villanova for their third Big 



East win. In another great 
moment, co-captain Steve 
Marciano hit a home run over 
the green monster in the 
Beanpot game against 
Harvard. 

Under the continuous 
guidance of Head Coach Ri- 
chard "Moe" Maloney, one 
could have wondered why 
the overall record of 14-23-2 
did not reflect this kind of 
talent. According to 
Bettencourt, "It was a re- 
building year with a young 
team. We only had three se- 
niors. We realize that we 
didn't attain our goals, so 
we're working even harder 
to attain them in '95. We're 
hoping the experience we 
gained will be enough to put 
BC back in the running for 
the Big East tide." 

One thing that was 
never in question was the 
heart of the team. As Romboli 
put it, "Through the good 
times and the bad, the team's 
morale was never down due 
to the close bond between 



us. 



Beverly Mather 



"It was a rebuilding year with a young 



team. 



Mark Bettencourt 



"Through the good times and the had, 
the team's morale was never down. " 



Curt Romb 



Potential 

for 
Greatness 



jsssss 



I 



Entering the 1994 sea- 
son, the Softball team was look- 
ing at a very young group. The 
in-field consisted primarily of 
new players, with the excep- 
tion of first baseman Kellie 
Cross and catcher Sue Corwin. 
The team started off slowly, 
but by the end of the spring 
they certainly knew what their 
capabilities were. 

Ending with a 26-21 
record, the team came away with 
a great ambition for the 1 995 sea- 
son. Coach McGuire noted that 
with a .341 batting average and 
great pitching skills, freshman 
Alexis Beckman was a "pleasant 
surprise," and freshman Debbie 
Nasitka provided a sound effort 
behind the plate. 

"We were young and 
made mistakes," said Coach 
McGuire of the 1994 season. 
Although they lost to 
Villanova, thus losing a place 
in the Big East Finals, they 
beat powerhouse UM ASS and 



Nationals-bound Providence. 81 
This team was certainly a team ii 
that should not have been taken Iff: 
lightly. 

After watching her team 
in the 1994 fall tournament, 
McGuire was convinced that 
"BC could play with anybody." 
She saw great offensive poten- 
tial, which was sfrengthened by 
the three recruited freshman 
pitchers. Coach also took spe- 
cial note of the outstanding abil- 
ity of Nasitka at short stop. Kate 
Giardi, Cross, Nasitka, Diane 
Croff, Beckman, Corwin, and 
Julie Obear were the players 
who were to "take the team to 
the next level," said McGuire 

In addition to being 
competitive athletes, these 
girls were determined schol- 
ars. Centerfielder Giardi, 
rightfielder Marci Cornell, 
catchci Till ■■ in .Mid fii i 
basem.iii( i"^^ ■ ^ u ill I'.iii "i 
the "Bi- I .iM Ml \..id.-iiii. 
All-Stn I.. nil Ml I"" I 



\lll> \i ^v-ii.iiiii 



m 



'BC could play wit! 



*4 , « 



Coach McGuire 




ro 

in 

llo 

ill 





Left Page (Top): Alexis Beckman shows 
some determination as she sends in the 
pitch. (Bottom): Heather Spellman 
scoops up a ground ball. 
Right Page (Above): A Lady Eagle 
makes a hit. 



'>ont (I to r): Marci Cornell, Deborah Nasitka, Sue Corwin, Angela Macsenti, Julie Obear, Karen 
imma. Middle (i to r): Head Coach Nancy McGuire, Heather Spellman, Kate Giardi, Jennifer 
ipellman, Kelly Cross, Assistant Coach Krissy Fairbanks, Assistant Coach Steffany Bender. Back 
I to r): Kelly Hiring, Alexis Beckman, Jess Brechtl, Laura Thompson, Diane Croff, Liz Walker, 
Cellie Beckwith. 



Softball 239 




Front (I to r): Lisa Doty, Joanie Solimine, Christine Curley, Ann Hyland, Shannon Doyle. Middle (1 to r): Libby Hays, Kell 
Mclntyre, Jessica David, Gaffney McGrath, Lisa Taylor, Kristen Hogan, Sue Long, Beth Signori, Megan McEIvogue. 
Back (1 to r): Head Coach Sherren Granese, Manager Keith McCluskey, Beth HoIIeran, Tobin Dominick, Kristen O'Brien, Chriss 
Kelleher, Bryn Chave, Michelle LaBonge, Assistant Coach Kristen McCarthy. 



Right Page (Top Center): Annie Swenda tries to get 
handle on the ball as Christine Curley looks on. (Bottom 
Gaffney McGrath looks to pass the ball to a teammate 
Left Page (Far Left): Lisa Taylor moves forcefully pa; 
her opponent. 



240 Women's Lacrosse 




Seniors Prove 

To Be A 
Strong Force 



"A band of gypsies" 
was the term by which the 
1 994 Boston College women' s 
lacrosse players affectionately 
referred to themselves. The 
team endured more than their 
fair share of hardships during 
the 1 994 spring season as they 
were forced to travel more than 
previous years due to the lack 
of a home field. Alumni Sta- 
dium was in the process of 
renovation, causing uncer- 
tainty as to where the team 
would be practicing and play- 
ing. Yet these setbacks were 
overcome and the team actu- 
ally became closer as a result. 
"We wanted to win - to make 
people notice BC lacrosse,'* 
stated Gaffney McGrath. 

The women's lacrosse 
team was coached by Sherren 
Granese, who was in her sev- 
enth season at BC. Senior 
captains Ann Hyland, Shan- 
non Doyle, and Lisa Doty 
helped lead the team to suc- 
cess. "The leadership the se- 
niors inspired last season en- 
abled our entire team to ac- 
complish BC ' s best - 1 2th rank- 
ing," said Lisa Taylor. 

Coach Granese felt 
that the five seniors on the 
team constituted a major part 
of the team effort. They had 



started since their freshman 
year, improving consistently 
throughout their Boston Col- 
lege careers. Ann Hyland 
received the "Most Dedicated 
Player" award. Shannon 
Doyle and Lisa Doty were 
named to the Ail-American 
second team, Christine Curley 
was selected to play in the 
Senior All-Star Game, and 
Joanie Solimine was named 
to the All-American third 
team. Freshman Megan 
McElvogue started in goal, 
and sophomore Bryn Chave 
was the leading scorer. 

A major highlight of 
the season was the ECAC 
tournament, by which time 
the team was ranked thirteenth 
in the country. Boston Col- 
lege beat rival University of 
New Hampshire in the last 
three seconds of the game. 
The Lady Eagles played the 
University of Virginia, the de- 
fending National Champions, 
and only lost by a score 
of 9-7. 

The season ended on 
a positive note as the Lady 
Eagles showed that they were 
a major threat in women's 
lacrosse! 

Lara Farrell 



"The leadership the seniors inspired last 
season enabled our entire team to 
accomplish EC's best -12th ranking. " 

LisaTavlor 



Setting Goals and 

Making 

Contributions 



One does not usually 
associate cold weather and 
snow with a spring sport such 
as lacrosse. Much to one's dis- 
may, snow did hit the Heights 
in March and the 1994 Men's 
Lacrosse team had the "plea- 
sure" of scoring goals, tack- 
ling Harvard Boys, and best of 
all, winning in it. Reflecting 
back on the 1994 season, 1995 
co-captains, Marc Deragon 
and Brian Shanley, took spe- 
cial note of that Harvard game. 
It went into overtime and the 
victory brought many smiling 
faces to the Boston College 
Lax team. As the first victory 
over Harvard since 1981, 
Coach Moy commented that 
"it proved that they could beat 
anybody." 

Despite the wonderful 
memory of the Harvard game, 
Coach Moy insisted that the 
New Hampshire game was 
what best reflected the team. 
"The victory over New Hamp- 
shire showed real determina- 
tion on the team's part," com- 
mented Moy. This game fol- 
lowed two disappointing 
losses, and knowing that ev- 



ery game counts, the team gave i 
it their all, as illustrated by the | 
score of 11-8. 

The key team contribu- 1 
tors of the season included: 
attackman Laurens Goff, |; 
Goalie Keith Lillis, and;; 
defensemen Scott Smith and 
Brian Shanley. Coach Moy 
proudly said, "Shanley was as 
good as any midfielder in New 
England." Even though these 
were key players, everyone 
was a big asset. This would 
hold even more true in the 1 995 
season as Deragon noted that 
"there is not one who is the 
super star." 

Entering every new 
season, everyone wants to do 
better than the previous year . . 
The goal of the 1994 Men's ^' 
Lacrosse team was to be over ^ 
500. Although this goal wasl^^^' 
not reached, the team's ability ^>~^ 
was clearly shown through the 
games that they did win. With "^ 
each game, they gained knowl 
edge and experience. Shanley ^ 
confidently stated, "BC can 
play with the best and people 
should not take us lightly." 



Amy Arsenault i 



^ 






I 




mm 



/ 



\ 



v;^* > 





Left Page (Top): Jason Silkey keeps 
the ball away from a UMASS 
defenseman. (Bottom): BC goes head 
to head against a Minuteman. 
Right Page (Above): BC retains 
possession of the ball. (Left): BC gets 
caught up but still holds onto the ball. ■ 



Men's Lacrosse 243 




244 # Shining Through 



SENI 




S 



Presenting 
The Class of 1995 



'^i 



Four years ago the Class of 1 995 entered Boston College 
with a glimmer of light in their eyes and a hope of the 
future. During these years, the friendships that were formed 
and the opportunities that were explored far exceded the 
expectations of the typical college experience. Time flew by 
as we celebrated the victories, supported each other through 
tough moments, and made memories that would last a 
lifetime. Senior year arrived quicker than ever expected and 
thoughts turned toward graduation and continuing onward. 
Between taking senior portraits, filling out graduate school 
applications, and typing resumes, seniors savored each last 
moment of college life. Through their hard work and 
dedication to others, the senior Class of 1995 came shining 
through. 



Kathryn Doerr and Julie Griffiths 

Co-Editors 

Barbara McGuiness 

Perspectives Editor 



Seniors # 245 




246 Seniors 




Class of 1995 247 




248 Seniors 




Class of 1995 249 




Laura Abella 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Yvette L. Acosta 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Christopher J. 
Acquaviva 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Colleen A. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John G. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Conchita S. Adsuar 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Suzette Afonso 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Marci L. Aforismo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John Agra 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



250 



Michael J. Aiena 

School of Management 

Marketing / Operations 

& Strategic Mgt. 



Louis P. Aiossa 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Mathematics 



William J. Aippersbach 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Cynthia J. Akus 


Ahmed Al Noaimi 


Valerie S. Alabanza 


Thomas M. Albert! 


Sean J. Albright 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Political Science 


General Management 


Political Science 


Marketing 


Accounting 





Albert V. Alcantara 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Hassan Aldahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Hesham H. Ali 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah Allard 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Garth P. Ailing 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Mario A. Alonso 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 




Jennifer M. Alvarez 

School of Education 
Elem. / Mod. Special 
Needs / Human Devt. 




251 



Christine Ambrose 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Felix Amerasinghe 

School of Management 

Finance 

Sociology 



Elizabeth A. Amery 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jessica T. Amorosa 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Loretta M. Amoroso 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jeremy M. Anagnos 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gevonne A. Anatol 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa M. Anderson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Margaret E. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Allison L. Andres 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Political Science 



' Ji 








J 




■L« 








■ 


TM 


j^^S^ 


i 


i 




^ 


-^iH 




Laura F. Angelino 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer M. Angelo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Megan E. Annitto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Stephen J. Antonik 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Psychology 



Kathryn M. Antos 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Jason D. Apicella 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



252 



Jennifer A. Aquino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Spanish 



Anthony M. Aramburu 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Diane M. Arciero 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Ed. 

Child in Society 



Barbara A. Armstrong 

School of Management 
Accounting 




*»\ 






rian A. Armstrong 


Amy M. Arnesen 


Amy M. Arnold 


William J. Arnone 


Marcie T. Aroy 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Marketing 


English 


Finance 


Psychology 




Julie A. Ashley 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 



Karyl J. Astle 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 




Daniel Atanasov 


Dominique F. Atteritano 


Jennifer M. Aucoin 


Todd W. Auger 


Elissa P. Austria 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Political Science 


Biochemistry 


Accounting 


Germanic Studies 



253 



Daniel M. Avitabile 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Shirley M. Badon 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Ryan M. Badua 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Patricia M. Bain 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jonathan L. Bajohr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jennifer C. Baker 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Nicole D. Baker 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tara A. Baker 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



254 



Christopher J. Balch 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Robert T. Baldini 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Robert J. Balog 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 



Lisa A. Balzarini 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Mod. Spec. Needs 



Jane E. Barbaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christina J. Barbieri 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Candice M. Barnes 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Samuel B. Barone 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Clinton J. Barras 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew D. Barron 

Arts & Sciences 
Russian 



Marcela Barcenas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Colleen E. Barry 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Nicole M. Barry 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicole A. Battaglia 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Bridget A. Battle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John Bayers 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Germanic Studies 




Michael C. Baytion 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 





Renee L. Beard 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jeanne A. Beauregard 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Brian M. Beaverstock 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James M. Belarmino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Robert W. Bell 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



255 




256 Seniors 




Class of 1995 257 









Bettina B. Bepler 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kimberly E. Berghaus 

Arts & Sciences 
Englisli 



Kristin E. Bergin 

School of Management 
Finance 
Englisli 



Shirley Beriiier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Allison B. Berry 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Harold R. Berson 

School of Management 
Info. Systems / Finance 



258 



Candice R. Bertoline 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. / Mod. 
Spec. Needs / English 



Amy M. Bertolotti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lisa N. Bertrand 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Robert B. Belliveau 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Maria Beretis 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Human Dev. 




Bridget D. Berry 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Andre P. Bessette 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 





Sarah E. Bessette 


Christine Bettencourt 


Mark E. Bettencourt 


Sandeeep M. Bhammer 


Manisha H. Bhatt 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


English 


Political Science 


Finance 


History 
Spanish 




Robert W. Bilek 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kenneth F. Binsack 

School of Management 
General Management 



Maria Elena Biskinis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



John P. Bissonnette 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Luis Bittini 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jay S. Blair 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Zulema T. Blair 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Barbara Blanchard 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Paula C. Bletzer 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




259 




Jennifer L. Blois 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Robert D. Blute 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael J. Bohan 

School of Management 
General Management 
Information Systems 



Sliaron D. Bolduc 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Suzette M. Bolduc 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




^ 




Rachel A. Bologna 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Bridget K. Bomberger 

School of Management 
Accounting 



260 



Maggie A. Bonner 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Dionisios P. Booras 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Christian L. Bordick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher A. Borghi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeffrey P. Boris 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael P. Bosco 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nicole M. Bouchie 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Paula T. Boukouvalas 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 





Geraldine M. Bourquard 


Pierre A. Boursiquot 


Louis P. Bouzianis 


Jennifer A. Bowen 


Susan M. Boyle 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Finance 


Political Science 
Economics 


Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 


Economics 







^^^1 




Jennifer L. Boynton 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael J. Bradt 

Alts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Scott J. Brady 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mara Braunfelds 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Leigh H. Breitman 

School of Management 
Finance 





Dana J. Brennan 

School of Management 
General Management 




Shannon M. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communcations 



Elizabeth Brescia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Paula A. Bresnahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Catherine M. Bresonis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

261 





Molly C. Brick 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Cristina M. Brid 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Erika L. Brooker 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Monique N. Brossard 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer R. Brothers 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Elspeth L. Brown 

Evening College 
Business Administration 



Birgit J. Brown-Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Erica A. Brown 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Economics 



Jennifer A. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemisty 

Environmental Geoscience 



Michael F. Brown 

School of Management 
Marketing 





Pamela J. Brown 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Susan E. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Bruce F. Browning 

Evening College 
Social Science 




Sandra E. Brum 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Megan Bruno 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




k^iM 



John P. Bryson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joseph M. Bryson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Todd L. Bucey 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Kevin E. Buck 

School of Management 
Marketing 






ri 




Jerome C. Bucliley 


Marlene Buckley 


Sandhya R. Budhrani 


Christopher J. Budway 


Jonathan N. Bulman 


chool of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


English 


Accounting 
Information Systems 


Finance 


Sociology 



263 




264 Seniors 




Class of 1995 265 



Ashlee E, Bunt 


Jennifer D. Buote 


Krista M. Burderi 


Catherine D. Burgess 


Jennifer L. Burkart 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Sociology 


Accounting 


Economics 


Art History 


Finance 












Brendan D. Burke 

School of Management 
Finance 




David A. Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Kerry L. Burnham 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



.^m^,.. 








^pi^Ma|^ 




Mmtif mtmk 




^Ffi 9 ^Sk 




mi. 


k . 



Cliristine M. Burke 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




Christopher F. Burns 

School of Management 
Finance 



Cristine M. Burns 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



J. William Burns 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sheri Bushfleld 

School of Education 
Human Development 



266 



Charles K. Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Stephanie G. Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John D. Butters 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian M, Byrne 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Mary C. Byrne 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 






William J. Byrne 


Carmen E. Cadavid 


Meegan K. Callagy 


Colleen C. Callahan 


Michael J. Callahan 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Evening College 


Finance 


Economics 


Communications 


Marketing 


Social Science 


Information Systems 












John J. Callanan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katherine C. Calvelo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael P. Camarra 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michelle L. Cambria 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Miguel R. Camilo 

School of Management 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

Philosophy 





Elizabeth C. Campbell 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Nichole M. Campbell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Ben P. Cannatti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Stephen Cannella 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Mathematics 



Carolyn M. Cannistraro 

Evening College 
Psychology 

267 




Joanna M. Cannizzo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



James J. Carbone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer A. Carew 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew G. Carley 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer M. Carloni 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Gregg J. Carlson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stephanie P. Carlsten 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Patrick Carney Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Todd W. Carpenter 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Tyrell M. Carr 


Jennifer A. Carrino 


Deidre H. Carroll 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Nursing 



Matthew T. Carroll 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nancy M. Carroll 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



268 






I 



Robert M. Caruso 

School of Management 
Finance 



David J. Casanova 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Brian P. Casey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



John R. Casey 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristen M. Casey 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Shawn R. Cassedy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tricia A. Cassels 

School of Management 
Computer Science 




Karen Castano 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Fatima D. Castellanos 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 





Sarah E. Caswell 


Marc D. Cataldo 


Donna S. Catwell 


Kristina J. Caulfield 


Nicole L. Ceccarelli 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Spanish 


Communications 


Psychology 


English 


Early Child. / Human Dev. 



269 




Melissa M. Celata 


Natasha Cellini 


Cheryl D. Cenedella 


Heather A. Cerar 


Steven A. Cerce 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Evening College 


Elementary Education 


Nursing 


Communications 


Nursing 


Philosophy 


lath / Computer Science 












ah E. Cerkanowicz 


Frank T. Ceruzzi 


Erin G. Chabot 


Pamela A. Champagne 


Judy Chan 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Moderate Special Needs 


Management 


Psychology 


Sociology 




Human Development 








Kathy Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joanne A. Chang 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew P. Chapuran 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Anna P. Chaves 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Jenny Chen 

School of Management 
General Management 




Sandy Chen 

School of Management 
General Management 



Andrew S. Cheng 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Daniel S. Chertow 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Luke V. Chetlen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Winnie Cheung 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



270 




James M. Chidiac 


Oliver Chin 


Henry Ching 


Li-Fang Cliiou 


Dereli B. Chism 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Biology 


Computer Science 
Infonnation Systems 


Economics 


Biology 
Theater Arts 





Christopher T. Chitko 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 
Computer Science 




Yun Cho 

School of Management 
Computer Science 




Marvin K. Chow 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Seema Chowhan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James M. Chretien 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jeanine M. Christiansen 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Celeste N. Christianson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

271 




272 Seniors 




Class of 1995 273 



David M. Chromy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eileen Chung 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seong-Hoon Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James S. Cianci 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joshua T. Cianciolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Patricia A. Cilibrasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas A. Cincotta 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter D. Cirasella 

Alts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth A. Cirillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Noah C. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Robert D. Clark 


Joan E. Clarke 


Brian E. Clarkin 


Maureen E. Clary 


Alison M. Clausen 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Political Science 


English 


English 


Biology 





Darin J. Clemen te 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Catherine C. Clifford 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Robert Clifford 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew E. Cline 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael J. Cloutier 

School of Management 
Marketing 



274 




Jana Cocio 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael P. Cody 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christopher R. Coffey 
Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Craig S. Cogan 

Evening College 
History 



Timothy J. Cohane 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Dana R. Colarulli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Gayla A. Cole 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michele J. Colella 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Grayson A. Collina 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Ellen T. Collins 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Economics 




Salvador A. Colom 

School of Management 
Human Resources 




Bonnie J. Colombo 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Michael S. Comey 


Susan E. Compson 


Brian L. Condon 


Robert G. Congdon 


Elizabeth A. Conklin 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Psychology 


History 


History 


Psychology 







^"^^■^ 




(" 



i.E... 



illiam D. Conley Jr. 


Melissa M. Conlon 


Michael F. Conlon 


Joshua J. Conroy 


Matthew J. Conway 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


French 


Philosophy 


Finance 


English 





Richard D. Cook 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Computer Science 




Stephen A. Cooke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Christopher J. Cooney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Abigail V. Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



O 




k 



Bradley J. Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 
English 






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1 


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Jennifer A. Cooper 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christina Copanos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa A. Coppotelli 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



il.&^ 



John D. Corey 

School of Management 
Finance 





^k^m^^ 




William C. Corey 


Colin P. Corridon 


Suzanne E. Corwin 


Donna M. Cosentino 


Mihai Cosma 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Chemistry 


Political Science 


Mathematics 


Psychology 


Economics 



277 



Karen A. Costa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Christopher J. Costello 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



E. Amory Cotter 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Elizabeth C. Cotter 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Kerry Ann Coulter 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Karen M. Crincoli 

School of Management 
Finance/Economics 



278 



Jill K. Croke 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Jennifer A. Cronan 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Karen M. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Laura A. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 









^^^'"^S^. 



** 





Jeff S. Croteau 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Theater Arts 



Adrienne M. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Daniel E. Crowley 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Denise A. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Tara E. Cruickshank 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Clarissa L. Cruz 


Deborah Cruz 


Aimee L. Cullen 


Rory T. Cullen 


Brendan L. Cummings 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


English 


English 


Accounting 


Communications 


English 








Psychology 




Stacy L. Cunha 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian R. Cunniff 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christian C. 
Cunningham 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael A. Cuomo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jill S. Cupoli 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 




Daniel F. Curls 


Christine A. Curran 


Michelle M. Curran 


Beatrice G.T. Currier 


Michael J. Cuttica 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Evening College 


School of Management 


Information Systems 


Psychology 


Nursing 


Management 
Finance 


Finance 



279 




280 Seniors 




Class of 1995 281 



Kristen L. D'Aniato 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Economics 



Lynn M. D'Amore 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Anabella C. Da Silva 

Sciiool of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Mark A. Dacey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kristin E. Daly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tara M. Daly 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Thomas G. Dambra 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Megan E. Danaher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Rebecca S. Danesco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John J. Daniello 

School of Management 
Finance 





Cara J. Daniels 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gregory P. Daniels 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




282 



James P. Darrow 

School of Management 
Economics 
Sociology 



Keith P. Davey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Brandie M. David 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer M. Davis 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




James C. Dawe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew L. Day 

School of Management 
Finance 





Rebecca L. Day 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Lee C. Dayton 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Suzanne De Benedetto 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Margarita R. DeCastro 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Jeannie E. De La Cruz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






^^m^t.^ 



Albert M. De Plazaola 


Marco A. De Thomasis 


Alicia N. Dean 


Christopher T. 


Stephen DeBernardis 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


DeAnzeris 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Finance 


Marketing 


School of Management 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


Economics 




Finance/Marketing 





283 







A^i^^MMih 




Ellen W, Decherd 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas A. Dee 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher S. Deeley 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kevin A. Deeley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Molly A. DeFazio 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





% 




Christin O. DeFiglio 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Darren J. DeGioia 

School of Management 




Jodi A. DeLibertis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Marketing 



John L. Deignan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brian P. Delaney 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Michael A. Delaney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





A 

Brian M. Delia Rosa 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Tyra M. Dellacroce 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lisa M. DeLorie 

School of Management 
Finance 



CoUette B. Delphin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Sheree L. Demers 

School of Management 
Information Systems 

284 



Sarah J. DeMott 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Jennifer Denero 

School of Education 

Int. Special Needs 

Elementary Ed. / Music 



Kevin B. Dennehy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Nancy E. Dennery 

School of Management 
Accounting 






Craig M. DeOrio 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Jeanine M. DePasquale 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Katie DePasquale 

Sciiool of Management 
Marketing 



Martlia A. DePeters 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Marc S. Deragon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Steven L. Deroian 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Michael DeRosa 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jonathan E. Derome 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




MiM 



David V. DeRosa 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Computer Science 



James A. DeSimone 

School of Management 
General Management 



Mark A. DeSimone 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Bethany S. DeTar 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kara Deters 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patrick T. Devine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



285 




Stephen J. Devine 


Dawn M. Devlin 


Jennifer B. Devlin 


Maria K. Di Giovanni 


Stacey L. Di Jon 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


General Management 


Psychology 


Sociology 


Psychology 


English 



English 



Sociology 




Scott M. Diamond 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Daniel L. DiBartolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Shannon M. Dierks 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elaina DiGregorio 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 







William A. Dilanni 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Joseph P. Diliberto 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Michael A. Dimasi 

Evening College 
Management 



286 



Craig V. Dimitroff 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Erika I. Dimmler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Chris J. Dimon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mario DiMonaco 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Italian 



Jason S. Dinwoodie 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ross E. DiPietro 

Evening College 
Communication 



Karen E. Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kerry Lyn Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kevin J. Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lisa J. Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lara A. Divjak 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Bernard J. Dobski 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Danielle E. Doherty 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 




Rosa A. Dominguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



287 



Kristine N. Dominique 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mark E. Donahue 

Alts & Sciences 
French 



Keri L. Donaldson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Bruno N. Donat 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 



Andrew J. Dondero 

School of Management 
Finance 




David O. Donegan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brett M. Donelan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brendon J. Donnellan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elaine K. Donnelly 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 



James C. Donnelly 

School of Management 
Accounting 




arry M. Donohue 


Kathleen E. Donohue 


Gregory J. Donovan 


Margarita E. Donovan 


Sile C. Dooley 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Mathematics 


Psychology 
Philosophy 


English 


Sociology 




William J. Dorcena 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew D. Dorsey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



288 



Thomas A. Dougherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



William E. Dougherty 

School of Management 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 
Information Systems 



Melody S. Douglas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michelle M. Douglas 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Maura L. Downey 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathleen P. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Charles J. Drane 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Monique J. Dreger 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amy E. DriscoU 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Megan H. Doyle 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 




Margaret S. Driscoll 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Paul B. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Ryan M. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Tisa L. Dragos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Diane P. Duarte 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



289 




290 Seniors 




Class of 1995 291 




Shelley A. Duda 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Rachel Dudas 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Political Science 



Andrea Duffy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



David C. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kevin M. Duffy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 




Molly A. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



292 



Nora L. Duffy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Political Science 



William J. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



William R. Duffy Jr. 

School of Management 
General Management 



Michael W. Duggan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Philip E. Dujardin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristina B. Dulberger 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew M. Dullea 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael J. Dullea 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew A. Dumenigo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Chad A. Dunn 


Elizabeth E. Dunn 


Michael M. Dunphy 


Julie E. Durgin 


Mary Alice Duthie 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Computer Science 


English 


Information Systems 


Communications 


Nursing 


Open & Strat. Mgmt. 




Marketing 








Simon A. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 




Keith S. Dynan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Robert S. Dynan Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



M^ 



t 



The Eagle 


Charles P. Earland 


Catherine V. Eastwood 


Sakyo Ebihara 


Soston College 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School Spirit 


Sociology 


Political Science 


Marketing 




David B. Edson 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Candace E. Egan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



Jennifer C. Egan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patrick J. Egan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ayako Eguchi 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




O 



mA\ 





Mark W. Ehrenzeller 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Carolyn H. Eidt 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Erich P. Eisenegger 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Daniel J. Eldredge Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer A. Elenbaas 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental 

Geoscience 




294 



Stephen Elia 


Dorothy Elms 


Sandra Lis A. Elum 


Vanessa R. English 


Margaret L. Enis 


ol of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


English 


Accounting 


Finance 


Economics 
Spanish 



Cynthia A. Ennis 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jean H. Ennis 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



O 



Sean M. Ennis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sheila C. Esposito 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Aderson Exume 

Evening College 
Philosophy 



Allison M. Enright 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



i 






Jeanine Enste 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Brigette A. Erwin 


Eric S. Esfahanian 


Joanna Espasas 


Lesli C. Esposito 


Lori A. Esposito 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Psychology 


English 


Art History 


Political Science 


Elementary Education 




Philosophy 




History 


Human Development 






James C. Fanning 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brendan M. Farmer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Dina Farnan 

Scliool of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen M. Farrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Patrick K. Faherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Craig R. Falzone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Scott C. Farrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Sean P. Farrelly 

School of Education 
Human Development 



296 



Susan N. Fasano 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Christine J. Faucher 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Joseph Favuzza 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Alicia J. Fay 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



i^ 






^^M 




Kris G. Federico 


David J. Fee 


James B. Feeley 


Allison Feeney 


Claire M. Feeney 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Communications 


English 


History 


English 
Political Science 




Jason A. Felch 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



John J. Fennessy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joanne Ferdinand 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Laura S. Ferraguto 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



David J. Ferreira Jr. 

School of Management 
Accounting 




David J. Ferruolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sylvain C. Fey 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Political Science 



Gene T. Feyl 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Emily A. Ficociello 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kristen E. Fiederlein 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 




Jeannine I. Fiegoli 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Stephanie R. Fiesta 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patricia Figueiredo 

Evening College 
Business 



Ediberto Figueroa 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tanya S. Figueroa 

School of Management 
Accounting 

297 




298 Seniors 




Class of 1995 299 






1 


Jf '**'■ -^ 


1 


2 


B 


1 




k 




Rachel L. Finkle 


David E. Finnegan 


Michelle E. Fiorella 


Sandra A. Fioretti 


Farzeen Firoozi 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Communications 


Enghsh 




..^^^1^. 



Julie B. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




t 




Keely A. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Marc E. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Neal A. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Neil P. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Amy S. Fitzgibbons 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Matthew H. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Sondra Fizzinoglia 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 




Jennifer B. Flad 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Sean P. Flahaven 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Music 



Deidre C. Flaherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Karen A. Flaherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kenneth Flaherty 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Tricia Flaherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Kim D. Flanigan 

School of Management 

Economics 

Information Systems 



Kerry A. Fleck 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Stacey M. Fleming 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Timothy T. Fleming 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Catherine P. Flores 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology/Sociology 



301 




David T. Flynn 

Alts & Sciences 
Economics 




Mark C. Flynn 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mary Cristin Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Brian T. Foerster 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Erik P. Fortier 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert W. Fortier 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



302 



Gregory P. Fortuna 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Robert Foster 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah E. Foley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jenelle M. Foye 

School of Management 
Marketing 



"-■J 






Nora E. Francescani 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer Francis 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jose S. Franco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Patrick T. Franke 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicholas S. Frasca 

Arts & Sciences 
Russian 



j^E^ESi 



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Mk^M 





Christopher M. Frassetto Kenneth D. Freda, Jr. 

School of Management School of Management 



Finance 



Accounting 



Joseph E. Freddolino 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth K. Frese 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Janet S. Friedman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Cindy J. Frisby 


Katherine A. Fromm 


Frank S. Fuda 


Carrie L. Furlan 


Elisa M. Gabelli 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Human Development 


Biochemistry 


History 


Psychology 




Ellen Gaccione 


Jeannette E. Gaehwiler 


Christopher J. Gaeta 


Kristen D. Gaffny 


Darren J. Gagliardi 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Nursing 


Mathematics 


Finance 
Marketing 


Early Childhood 
Human Development 


Accounting 

3( 



David M. Gagne 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gary R. Gagne 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gregory J. Gagne 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Melissa L. Gagnon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michelle T. Gagnon 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Marietta Galindez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 



James E. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Joan D. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John J. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 







?». 



Katherine A. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
PoUtical Science 




Michelle P. Gallagher 

School of Management 
Accounting 



304 



Francesco L. 
Galli-Zugaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sarah B. Galligan 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 



Jennifer A. Galmiche 

School of Management 
Accounting 




r% 




Jennie M. Galvin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Rose Lynn Gama 

Elementary Education 

Mod. Special Needs 

Child in Society 



Brent L. Gamit 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Eric Gangl 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Amy M. Gardiner 

School of Management 
Economics 



Alexandra J. Ganim 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Patricli A. Ganz 


Rebecca P. 


Arts & Sciences 


Garcia-Trias 


English 


Arts & Sciences 




History 





Meagan E. Gardner 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Todd L. Garman 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 



Patrick J. Garon 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Kathleen P. Garvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Alisa C. Gatti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lynette A. Gatti 

School of Education 
Early ChUdhood/English 



305 




306 Seniors 



^^xliik. 






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Class of 1995 307 







Kristen A. Gattozzi 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Joli A. Gatzen 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed. / Mod. Spec. 
Needs / Child in Society 



Christopher M. Gaudet 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Colleen T. Gavan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Maria Paz Gazmuri 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Tiffany A. Geahigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Patrick C. Geden 

School of Management 
Finance 



Danielle J. Gennardo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrea M. George 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed. / Mod. Spec. 
Needs / Child in Society 



Christopher I. Georgules 

Arts & Sciences 
English 






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Laurie Geraffo 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. /Mod. Spec. 

Needs / English 



Bartholemew D. Gerardi Georgette M. Germain 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Computer Science Accounting 



Edouard R. Gerschel 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ronald F. Giancristofaro 

School of Management 
Finance 





Archie J. Gianunzio 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Melissa K. Gibbons 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



i 

i 

Joseph R. Gibson 

School of Management 
Finance 




Pamela L. Giebutowski 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Charles F. Gilbride 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



308 



Gretchen A. Gill 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jacqueline A. Gillis 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Spec. 

Needs / Political Science 



Thomas G. Gilmartin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Carl J. Giordano 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Rebecca M. Girard 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Lisa R. Girolamo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael A. Girouard 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael J. Giuffrida 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rosina L. Giuliante 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kenneth A. Giuriceo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Keri A. Gleason 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Ellen B. Gleeson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



309 



Lauren C. Gloster 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gina E. Goforth 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Alexandra M. Goiricelaya 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 



David V. Goldman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Natalie Q. Go 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Music 



Margarita V. Goco 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Tammy L. Godino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas D. Godino 

School of Management 
Marketing 




310 



Margarita Gomez 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Maria M. Gomez 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 



Carmen M. Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Spanish 



Josephine A. Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Maria Elena Gonzalez 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



James R. Goodman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Eveleen A. Goodsell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

EngHsh 



Christopher T. Gorman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Julia S. Gormley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 







Lauren K. Grant 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 



Rosemarie Graves 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kristen M. Graziano 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Maureen A. Grealish 

School of Management 
Finance 




Lisa A. Goss 


Daniel F. Grabos 


Brian R. Graff 


Robert Grande 


Erin O. Granger 


LTts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Art History 


Finance 


Accounting 


Economics 
Political Science 


English 
History 




Ann C. Greeley 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

French 






Jennifer S. Green 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Charles W. Greenan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Joseph A. Greer 

School of Education 
Human Development 



John J. Gregorio 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Holly R. Grey 

School of Management 
Accounting 



311 





Donna H. Grickowski 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Cara E. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 





John J. Griffin III 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mary E. Griffin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Megan C. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Julie Anne Griffiths 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Tanya S. Grosse 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kristen A. Grosshans 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David M. Guarnieri 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David A. Guerrero 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Deana M. Guidi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Shelley A. Gumucio 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



312 



Megan E. Gurda 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Charles M. Gurtler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer B. Haberlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Danielle M. Habhab 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brian Hackenburg Maureen J. Hadley 



Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Katherine A.M. Hagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Kathryn L. Hagerty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joanna Habib 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 




Ryan O. Haggerty 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Alison N. Mainline 

School of Education 

Elementaty Education 

Child in Society 




Thomas P. Haley 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




313 




314 Seniors 




Class of 1995 315 





Michael E. Hall 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Susan L. Hallock 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 






Andrew B. Hamerling 

School of Management 
General Management 



Margaret M. Hamilton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Majd N. Hammad 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Emily M. Hancock 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sandra M. Handojo 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Theology 





Tamara C. Haney 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel F. Hanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kathleen A. Hanna 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elizabeth A. Hannabury 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Robert Hannan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



316 




u 



Christopher G. Hannon Stephanie S. Hanselman 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

History Theater Arts 



Alison A. Hardiman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amy Hardiman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




x-C IB-N 




Brian C. Hardiman 

School of Management 
Finance 




mhdk 





Jason M. Hare 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael J. Harkey 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Jason A. Harman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Amy Harmon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Gregory T. Harrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Mark Harrington 


Robert R. Harrington 


Stephanie M. Harrison 


Kevin D. Hart 


Karen J. Hartman 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Communications 


General Management 
Psychology 


Accounting 


English 
History 





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Amy G. Hartwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mark Harvey 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Julie K. Hatcher 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sara J. Hathaway 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Melissa E. Hatton 

School of Management 
Finance 



317 





Edward T. Hayden 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jessica K. Hazard 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Marc D. Hazel 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Stephanie A. Head 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brendan B. Heafey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kristen B. Healy 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Kristen T. Heaney 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



John P. Hebert 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth J. Hegarty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Arpi S. Heghinian 

School of Management 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

Marketing 





Jennifer E. Heidler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Megan C. Heinzelman 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Theresa L. Heitz 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
PoUtical Science 



Joni A. Hemond 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jenny R. Henderson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Derek C. Herbst 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Richard C. Herman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elizabeth A. Herson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Int. Special Needs 





Brendan J. Hickey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Communications 



Claris E. Hidalgo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Allison B. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Jodi L. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathryn A. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Timothy P. Hilton 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Monique E. Hinchcliff 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Mary C. Hines 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Antonia C. Hipp 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anne M. Hipskind 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



319 




Br rv> 





Charles C. Hipwood 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Daphne CM. Ho 

School of Management 
Mariceting 



Wenyu T. Ho 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Tracy R. Hofmann 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ann D. Holbrook 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Lauren B. Horton 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Keith S. Horyczun 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Lisa S. Houghton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sean P. Houlahan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Henry H. Hsia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



320 








Sarah K. Hsiao 


Peter A. Hudnut 


Althea E. Hudson 


Brett A. Hudson 


Keith H. Hughes 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Philosophy 


History 


Communications 


Political Science 


Finance 




Elena B. Hull 


Caitlin B, Hunt 


Christopher J. Hunter 


Honora D. Hunter 


Simone M. Hurley 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Studio Art 


Marketing 


Political Science 


Psychology 


English 




Charles D. Hurst 


Michael C. Hyer 


Kathleen F. lacono 


Jason C. Imperato 


Kristy S. Ingargiola 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


iuman Resource Mgmt. 


Marketing 


Biochemistry 


Biology 


Human Development 


Marketing 








English 






Mark A. Ingraham 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

International Studies 



Kellie M. Innocenti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Julie N. Iris 

School of Management 
Finance 



Margarita E. Irizarry 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



^^ 



Fyaz Islam 

School of Management 
Marketing 



321 




322 Seniors 




Class of 1995 323 





Manish Israni 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 



Laura A. ludiciani 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Cindy M. Ivanac 

School of Management 
Finance 



Shayne C. Jackson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Tracy E. Jackson 


Sarah G. Jacob 


Jennifer Jacobs 


Christian K. Jacobsen 


Heather K. Jaeger 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Accounting 
Finance 


Marketing 


Art History 
Philosophy 







dt'^^iM 



324 



Victoria M. Jaeger 


Katherine M. Jahnes 


Tina Jairath 


Michael A. Jakubowicz 


Andrew S. Janczak 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Biology 


Finance 


Political Science 


Economics 




English 


Marketing 




Marketing 




Tom C. Janson 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Michael P. Jette 

Arts & Sciences 
Ciiemistry 




I 



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I 



I 



Ivy K. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Louis F. Januzzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




\ 



Shelley A. Johannesen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Kevin C. Johnson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Molly E. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ruth E. Johnson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marsha A. 
Jean-Baptiste 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Emily E. Jeep 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Thomas H. Jennings 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Theology 






Dominique 
John-Baptiste 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brooke H. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Spanish 



Daniel C. Johnson 

School of Management 
Finance 





325 



Sean B. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Derek S. Johnston 

School of Management 

Finance 

Communications 



Jennifer H. Johnston 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 



Elizabeth Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Shannon T. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 






^hi. 




Zachary R. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Kristen J. Josefek 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Melissa Juan 

School of Management 
Finance 
Spanish 



Mathew M. Kachur 

School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Robert J. Kadijevic 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 





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Sheila Kahaly 

Evening College 
Management 



Cindy Kalar 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kristina kanawada 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



William X. Kane 

School of Management 
Finance 



Teresa Kanjuparamban 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Shahan J. Kapitanyan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

326 



Melissa A. Karam 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Michael A. Karazin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Wendy J. Kastelein 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Lori R. Kasten 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



**•* 



^: 






Andrea S. Kaufmann 


Emi Kawaji 


Katsuji J. Kawasaki 


Nora M. Kazanjian 


Carlyn Keane 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Communications 


Spanish 


Political Science 




Karen M. Keane 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Kimberly G. Keating 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 





Kristine E. Kearney 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 





Lawrence J. Keating 

Arts & Sciences 
History 








Erika C. Keil 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Douglas S. Keith 

School of Management 
Finance 



Roger A. Kelesoglu 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Environmental Geoscience 



Kenneth J. Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Rebecca L. Kelley 

School of Management 
Accounting 



327 




328 Seniors 




Class of 1995 329 



Adam T. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brian J, Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brian P. Kelly 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin E. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Erin K. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Meghan C. Kelly 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kara E. Kennedy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa M. Kenney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carolyn M. Kenny 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Thomas J. Kenny 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Studies 




Michael T. Keogh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Colleen M. Keough 

School of Education 
Human Development 



330 




Jason F. Ketchen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ayman I. Khaberi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Lara N. Khlopin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Mark D. Khorsandi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brian N. Khoury 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




David N. Khoury 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer L. Khoury 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Noelle F. Khoury 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Kevin C. Kidder 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Connie Kim 

School of Management 
Accounting 

331 



Katherine Kim 

School of Management 
Finance 



Daniel H. King 


Trisha E. Kipp 


Maria Kishliovsky 


Stefan Kjaer nested 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Geology 


Russian 


Finance 




Karen L. Klein 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Maria E. Klein 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Charles A. Kline 

Evening College 
General Management 




Brian E. Klucznik 

School of Management 
Accounting 



332 



Kimberly A. Kohlman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Brian J. Komanecky 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michelle M. Kondo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




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Christopher F. Kondrath 


Yumiko Kono 


Joseph M. Kopilak 


David A. Korn 


Peter C. Kotz 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Communications 


Sociology 


Accounting 


Economics 


Finance 







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Christina Koumantzelis 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Jiro Koumi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Tanya Kowalczykowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Bonnie L. Kozel 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Pablo M. Koziner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marketing 





// 



^M^Ljm 




Jason R. Krantz 


Brian S. Kraus 


Edward T. Kraus 


Katherine A. Krause 


Jennifer L. Krauss 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Human Development 


Psychology 


Finance 












Tatiana A. Krausz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James M. Krayer 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Peter C. Kullman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ajay Kuntamukkala 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jason K. Kuntz 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



333 



Erica Y. Kurkjian 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Christina H. Kuszewski 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Spanish 



Robert M. Kvamme 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Henry Kwan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Eugene L. Kwong 

School of Management 
Accounting 




usan M. La Fond 


Tracey H. Labossiere 


Robert A. Laferriere 


Heather J. Laflamme 


Natacha Lafleur 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Political Science 


English 


Finance 


Elem. Ed. / Int. Spec. 
Needs / Psychology 


Accounting 



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Clair L. Lakkis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Eleanor A. Lalli 

School of Management 
Accounting 



334 



Joseph P. Lally 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Thomas J. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kerri A. Langan 

Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Jennifer L. Lanzarone 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Vittorio S. Lapira 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Glen C. Larkin 

School of Management 
Finance 




David Lau 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle K. Lau 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Thomas C. Lau 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 



Scott R. Lavinia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Martin H. Lawlor 

School of Management 
General Management 

335 




336 Seniors 




Class of 1995 337 




Todd A. Lawrence 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lazaros Lazarides 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Maria Anna C. Lazo 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Brendan Leahy 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Moderate Spec. Needs 



Stephan G. Leal 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 





Chanda D. Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Juliette S. Leary 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

International Studies 



Heather L. Leavell 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Melanie J. LeComte 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ann T. LeDang 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 




Daniel G. Leder 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jacqueline M. Ledoux 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Anna M. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



David J. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lance Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 





Michael M. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robin Ann S. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Steven Y. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



338 



Yuki Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Art History 



Constance M. LeFaou 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




^#«* 



Antoinette B. Lefebvre 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




\ 



I 



im^ 




Yvette M. LeFebvre 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Denise O. LeGarda 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Eduardo Leiva 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael F. Lenz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jacy A. Leonardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ann-Marie Leroux 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 







Daniel J. Levasseur 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 



Ursula A. Leveille 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Amy C. Levenson 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Nicole Levine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Adrienne C. LePore 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



r 




Amy M. Le Valley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Darren Levy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



339 




Heather M. Lewallen 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Heather A. Lewchik 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental 

Geoscience 



Emily C. Lewis 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Patricia Leyva 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Suzanne M. Libby 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sean M. Lilly 

Arts & Sciences 
English / Theater Arts 



Chong-Yoon Lim 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



340 



Katelyn M. Lindstrom 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Brigid M. Linnan 

School of Management 
General Management 



Anne E. Linnehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Scott M. Livingston 


Jennifer C. Loach 


Jennifer L. Locraft 


Danielle Loffredo 


Jennifer A. Logan 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


History 


Elementary Education 


Elementary Education 


Psychology 




Philosophy 


Child in Society 


Child in Society 






Alison M. Logrip 


Donna Lomenzo 


Karen C. Long 


Christopher L. Loper 


Elisa M. Lopez 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Political Science 


Accounting 


Marketing 


English 




David S. Lorent 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sandra Lourenco 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Eric S. Lowrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Thomas Y. Lu 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrea L. Luberger 

School of Management 
General Management 




nthony D. Lucafo 


Lillie Lucas 


Edward Ludwigson 


Jarrod J. Luke 


Maura B. Lunny 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Sociology 


Finance 
Philosophy 


Finance 
Communications 


History 



341 



, Glass ofl99J 

J ersoechoes 



ersp 



Four years ago we came to Boston College with 
many dreams, goals, and expectations. We were full of 
fear and insecurities; the major one being fear of failure. 
The pressure to succeed rested solely on our shoulders. 
We were given a challenge, a test to graduate BC as a 
credit to ourselves, our family, and our school. 

BC offered us many opportunities to grow, 
express our interests, and use our abilities to help 
others. We took these opportunities and worked 
earnestly. 

On graduation day we not only fulfill BC's 
promise, and our parents ' dreams, but we can now hold 
our heads up with confidence because we have won. 
We have passed the test and in doing so we are prepared 
to face life 's next challenge with confidence in ourselves . 

All of us without exception should be proud of 
our academic accomplishments. But there are many 
who deserve even more recognition because they 



distinguished themselves through their service to then 

community and their fellow man. These individuals 

excelled as students and as humanitarians. They 

generously took time to give most charitably ol 

themselves. Their public-spiritedness made them lead 

the pack. Their idealistic view earned them the respectj 

of their friends and fellow students, and their actions 

and hard work benefited all whose lives they touched. 

When we asked for nominations for outstanding 

seniors we were not surprised by the many names 

submitted. BC has always supported community 

involvement and the will to excel. However, the 

yearbook staff could choose only ten. The process ol 

choosing these ten was a long and difficult one because 

so many deserved more than a pat on the back for theii 

accomplishments. But, through hours of deliberation 

we narrowed the field to the following ten outstanding 

seniors. 

Barbara McGuiness 







342 Seniors 



Stephen J. Antonik 




Shelley Johannesen 



Throughout her four years at 

, Boston College, outstanding 

senior Shelley Johannesen has 

3een actively involved in helping 

'Dthers. Shelley has been an 

! \ppalachia Volunteer for two 

/ears, and a Jamaica Volunteer, 

Neil McDevitt 

When Neil McDevitt first 
itarted Boston College eight years 
igo, he dropped out. As a 
;ommuter student, Neil says he 
lidn't know anyone and didn't 
eel like he was a part of the 
;ampus. After taking a few years 
)ff he decided to try again, he 
explains, "my expectations 
;hanged the second time around." 
He explains for instance, "Ididn't 
|o into it expecting to have a 
nillion friends, I was happy with 
Tiy small circle of friends." Neil 
itill admits that he would much 
rather discuss important issues 
over a cup of coffee rather than 
type them out in a paper, but 
realizes the benefits of doing so 
greatly outweigh the time it takes 
to do a paper. Now, Neil not only 
excels as a history major, but also 
works full time at the Hyatt in 
Cambridge in order to finance his 
education. 

Neil grew up with people 

always debating politics, and feels 

I strongly that everyone should have 

ideas about politics. He spends 

most of his free time reading the 



where she lived with a host 
family while helping care for 
victims of leprosy and working 
with children in poverty. 

In addition to her volunteer 
work Shelley is the director of the 
Jenks Leadership Program, a 

paper and keeping up on 
important issues. Neil says his 
interest in politics is from an 
ideological perspective rather than 
from an activist standpoint and 
explains, "I think of myself more 
as a 'think tank' rather than 
someone who will go out with a 
picket sign or stuff envelopes." 

Neil insists that he doesn't 
admire politicians, yet still feels 
politics demand attention. If there 
is one person Neil does admire it 
is his father. He describes his 
father as a charming person in a 
way Neil never felt he could be. 
He says about his father, "he 
always has time to have 
meaningful conversations with 
people, not just say, 'hi, how are 
you?' and just walk away." 
Unlike his father, Neil considers 
himself "fairly sarcastic, I don't 
take things too seriously." 

Reflecting on his experiences 
he says, "Through losing my 
opportunities at BC then 
regaining them again I've 
realized the importance of and 
think well of my academic 
experience." 



Resident 
Assistant, and has 
been a member of 
the cross-country 
team for the past 
three years. 
Shelley says she is 
happiest when she 
is running, and has 
run the Boston 
Marathon twice 
since she's been at 
BC. 

Shelley admits 
ever since she was 
a little girl she 
dreamed of leaving 
Oregon and 

coming to the East 
Coast to be on her 
own. She feels BC 
is a dream come 
true, and has provided her with 
many avenues to build faith. She 
has attended mass every week at 
Manresa House, an organization 
that has been very important to 
her over the past four years. 
Shelley takes great pride in her 



y 



^~^ , 



M ^ i^i 



i*?^ 



family who had the courage to let 
her go when she needed to go, and 
gave her their support every step 
of the way. Shelley feels strongly 
that true success isn't found 
in how many awards and 
scholarships one can win, but 
through doing one thing and 
doing it well. She likes to Hve life 
every minute, "I live my life by 
doing things, not just thinking 
about them," she says, and has 
demonstrated effectively through 
her four years at BC. 




Stephen J. Antonik 



Perspectives 343 





Tina M. Lusignolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Carmela Luzzi 

School of Management 

Operations and Strategic 

Management 




Kerry A. Lyman 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brian M. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Elizabeth A. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer J. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stephen A. Mabry 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Tina Luisa MacAllister 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

344 



Carolyn G. MacNeiil 

School of Management 
Finance 



Margaret Machado 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nestor F. Machado 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Political Science 



Erin P. MacLean 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jed R. Maczuba 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Alicia B. Maderazo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brian T. Madigan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Julie A. Madjar 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Kanako Maeda 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 






Biagio Maffettone 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael M. Magliana 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Maureen E. Magnotta 

School of Management 
Information Systems 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 



Kristen M. Maguire 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Michael J. Maguire 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kristen M. Mahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Christa A. Maher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Mary K. Mahoney 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Tara C. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



345 



Susan J. Mallon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Alison Malloy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joel S. Malo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David Maloney 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Theresa E. Maloney 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Daniel J. Malooly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael B. Mamula 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John O. Mancini 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Suzanne T. Mancuso 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Amy E. Manganelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Tia E. Manhardt 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Peter Manis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lisa A. Manzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jason L. Mandell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Colleen E. Mara 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 




Anthony M. Maragno 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics/Mathematics 

346 



Lisabeth A. Marchioli 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Fabio Marciano 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jason T. Margnelli 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Sherri A. Mariani 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Susan E. Marietta 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Michael A. Mariniello 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Laura M. Marino 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Mark D. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael C. Marisca 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 






Melissa A. Markofsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Diane M. Markovits 

School of Education 

Elem. /Mod. Spec. Needs 

Child in Society 



Melbeth G. Marlang 

Arts & Sciences 

Art History 

Sociology 



Brent A. Marletti 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen C. Marmen 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Joseph Marnikovic 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Cosette M. Maroney 

School of Management 
Accounting 




347 



Mary Kaye Waldron 

If there is someone who exempUfies 
the motto "ever to excel" it would be Mary 
Kaye Waldron. Not only has she been a 
member of the Salt and Light company since 
she was a freshman, but she is also a volunteer 
for the Jenks Leadership Program, and a 



manager of the men's basketball team. Mary 
Kaye sees her involvement as a way to meet 
the wide range of people she has become close 
to over the past four years, and never sees her 
commitment to these organizations as a chore 
because she enjoys what she is doing and the 
people she is working with. 




Stephen J. Antonik 



When asked what she felt personal 
success entailed, Mary Kaye gave me a quote 
from Ralph Waldo Emerson that she keeps 
hanging on her wall. "To laugh often and 
much. .. to appreciate beauty, to find the best in 
others; to leave the world a bit better... to know 
even one life has breathed easier because you 
have lived. This is to have succeeded." 
Mary Kaye's family has always 
played an active part in her life, her 
parents come to every football game, 
throw amazing tailgates, and are 
actively involved in the BC 
community. The one person she finds 
truly inspirational is her mother. 

Her mother has always encour- 
aged her to overcome her obstacles and 
insists "just because you have to do 
things differently doesn't mean you 
shouldn't do them." This advice Mary 
Kaye has always held close throughout 
the serious concerns and challenges she 
has had to face. 

With the help of her supportive 
family and close friends Mary Kaye 
keeps everything in perspective, and 
doesn't take things for granted. She has 
always loved BC and can't imagine 
ever having gone anywhere else, she 
says, "the people Lve met and 
experiences Lve had will stay with me 
forever." 



Natalie Go 

Natalie Go has certainly 
made her mark throughout her 
four years at Boston College. She 
has demonstrated the rare ability 
to combine leadership and 
personal strength along with great 
artistic talent. 

Natalie shares the 
distinction of being both the 
vice-president of AHANA and the 
president of the Asian Caucus. 
Along with her important 
leadership roles, Natalie is also 
the president of the Music Guild, 
a BC organization which 
coordinates a wide variety of 
musical concerts for the listening 
pleasure of both students and 
faculty. Natalie says that one of 
her most important goals has been 
to further the causes of all of these 
organizations. 

When asked what it was 
that helped Natalie stay focused 
on her goals she replied, 
"knowing that people are 

348 Seniors 




Stephen J. Aiuonik 



counting on me." This, coupled 
with her love for music keeps her 
dedicated in playing violin in the 
Orchestra, and allowed her to win 
first place in the Concerto 
Competition through her talent in 
playing piano. 

Natalie never lets her 
accomplishments interfere with 
desire to continually challenge 
herself, she says that it is neither 
praise nor acknowledgement that 
she defines as success but rather 
being happy and really enjoying 
what she is doing. 

Natalie contributes the 
success she's had in hei 
achievements to the help and 
support of her friends and family 
who, she says, have given her 
the push she needed to be who 
she is now. Through this she 
has attained personal satisfaction 
not only for herself but also 
for those family and friends she 
has inspired and touched along 
the way. 



' David Prior 

If there is a senior that could 

pxemphfy the uniqueness of the 

' rlass of '95 that senior would be 

^avidPrior. David's offbeat sense 




Lashon Rhodes 

Charismatic, industrious, 
oal-driven, and someone who 
kes to laugh are all ways you 
ould describe Lashon Rhodes, 
he says just knowing that that 
he's helping someone motivates 
er to be actively involved in 
nd around the Boston College 
ommunity. 

Lashon has been involved 
vith the Residence Hall 
Association since her freshman 
'ear as well as giving a 
ubstantial amount of her time to 
he Student Judicial Board, Jenks 
leadership Program, The Film 
ioard, and as coordinator for the 
Jtudent Admissions Program, all 
vhile working as Assistant 
vlanager at Walgreens. 

Lashon finds personal 
ulfillment in everything she does 
f just one person is touched 
hrough her efforts. She 
)elieves that knowledge as well 
IS unconditional relationships are 
nost important in her life. She 
;ays, "ignorance is scary... you 



of humor and approach to life 
distinguish him as an outstanding 
senior. Some people would say 
that David transcends definition 
which is why he also goes by the 
name 
Allen. 

David 
has been a 
DJ at 

WZBC for 
the past 
three years 
bringing 
y ousuch 
shows as 
"Breakfast 
with 
Allen" and 
more 
notably 
"The Allen 
Prior Party 
Train" 
which 
feature 
music by 
his choice 
indie rock 
<:, h 1 A , 1 bands such 

Stephen J. Anionik 

grow so much as a person when 
you are exposed to education." 

When she is 
not volunteering or do- 
ing school work 
Lashon likes to start 
debates with her 
roommates which 
always wind up 
turning into lots of 
laughs. She admits that 
she is happiest when 
surrounded by people 
who care about her, and 
those she cares about. 

One person 
Lashon find inspiration 
in is her mother. 
Lashon says her mother 
is her cheering section, 
always encouraging 
her, making sure 
Lashon makes the most 
of the opportunities she 
did not have. 

Lashon works 
hard to somehow make 
a difference in the 
world, and hopes that 



as Thinking Fellers Union Local 
282, Television Personalities, 
Magnetic Fields, The August 
Sons, "and a host of others that 
y ou ' d be hip enough to know about 
ifyouhstened." DJing and being 
Music Director at WZBC has 
allowed David to write for 
underground rock magazines 
across the country. 

David also runs cross-country 
and track for the BC team and 
jokes, "I let people beat me, so 
they won't be discouraged." Talk 
about a considerate guy. 

David is also an avid baseball 
fan, and huge follower of the 
Boston Red Sox. Name the year 
and he can tell you which teams 
played, the score, and who the 
winner was of any World Series 
game. 

David has been described by 
his friends as "master storyteller," 
"Dy-no-mite," "the only person 
who could befriend a baked goods 
truck driver named Zeke," 
and "an animated character come 
to life." 

Commenting on his future 

people know that inside her 
sometimes serious exterior she's 







David says he would hke to be 
president, or maybe dictator 
someday. 

David says the philosophy that 
has gotten him through the past 
four years has been, "keep 
laughing even when you're 
crying inside." 

It's difficult to get a straight 
answer out of David, he seems 
always cynical and sarcastic, 
and always telling off-the-wall 
stories that leave you laughing, 
but rarely letting one get to 
know the real Allen, uh, I mean 
David Prior. 

an honest, caring, warm person, 
who is invariably willing to help. 




Stephen J. Anionik 



Perspectives 349 




Megan E. Maroney 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Gerard C. Marotta 

Arts & Sciences 
Pohtical Science 



Michael A. Marquez 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ingrid Marseille 

Evening College 
History 



Vanessa L. Martelli 

School of Management 
Finance 




Nilda E. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
French 



Ramon L. 
Martir-Burgos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Richard B. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Christopher J. Martone 

School of Management 
Finance 






Andrea M. Marzetti 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



350 



Takashi Masaki 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Silva Maserejian 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lori A. Masotta 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 



David G. Mastovsky 

School of Management 
Economics 



. 



James J. Mastroianni 

School of Management 
Finance 



Katherine N. Mateja 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John E. Matosky 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Megan A. Matviak Robert J. Mauri 

School of Education School of Management 

Human Development Oper.& Strat. Management 




Anthony J. Mautz 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joshua H. Maxfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Melinda L. Maxson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nicole M. Maxwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Katlyn May 


Bartosz J. Mazurek 


Patrick O. McAleer 


Brian V. McAuliffe 


Brian D. McBrearity 


rts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


History 


Political Science 


Biology 


Economics 



351 




Julie A. McBride 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer L. McCabe 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kevin J. McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth A. McCann 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Angela M. McCartliy 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Psychology 




Kevin C. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Michael J. McCarthy 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sean E. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Therese M. McCarthy 

Evening College 
English 



Kimberley A. 
McCarty 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Cynthia A. McClane 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Janet N. McClelland 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Keith V. McCluskey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer A. 
McCormack 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Patrick C. McCormack 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Brian P. McCoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



352 



Melinda B. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Susan E. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Adriana M.K. McDonald 
Tovar 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Bridget L. McDonald 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Math / Comp. Science 





thew S. McDonough 


Amy J. McDowell 


Erin McDuffie 


Sarah McFarland 


Daniel P. McGee 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Communications 


Psychology 


Nursing 


History 
Spanish 




Hugh McGlone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael J. McGovern 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ellen McGrath 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Gaffney A. McGrath 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tara K. McGrath 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



353 



Anna Lee 

Outstanding senior Anna Lee 
has accomplished an impressive 
aiTay of goals throughout her four 
years as a philosophy major at 
Boston College. Originally from 
Chicago, Anna defines herself 
through the broad relationships 
she has developed thus far in her 
life, she says she "likes to look for 
relationships in everything 
because everything is 
interconnected." Such strong 
beliefs regarding the relationships 
existing between all things 
has caused her to make a 
conscious effort not to 
isolate anyone or anything by 
compaitmentalization. As a result, 
Anna has truly distinguished 
herself by helping those less 
fortunate than herself. 

Anna was a member of the 
Urban Immersion program from 
her freshman through junior year 
and has also greatly contributed 
to the local Boston community 
through her volunteer work at 
Rosie's Place. At Rosie's Place 

Chris Hunter 

When Boston College senior 
Chris Hunter was asked what gave 
him motivation to excel he replied 
that he feels he has been blessed 
with an endless capacity to give 
and that he wants to use what he 



Anna says she ' s "learned the value 
of being able to voice one's rage 
about society's shortcomings and 
turn that rage into something 
worthwhile and beneficial to the 
community ." In addition to her 
volunteer work at Rosie's Place 
Anna is also an advocate at the 
Sexual Assault Network and the 
Woman's Resource Center. 

Aside from working with those 
in and around her community 
Anna also volunteered to go to 
Ecuador and Mexico with the 
Boston College Chaplaincy, 
experiences she found difficult 
yet rewarding. She feels with 
each personal challenge she takes 
on she achieves a deeper 
understanding of herself, and 
strongly believes spirituality is 
attained through doing ordinary 
things. Throughout such constant 
hard work and determination, 
Anna says the one thing that keeps 
her focused on the tasks at hand 
has been the hope that people 
give her. By working with others 
and for others Anna has continued 

has been given in order to help 
others. "Individuals have a 
responsibility to serve in some 
manner" he says, and according 
to that philosophy he has 
certainly excelled. 

Since his Sophomore year he 
has been a member of the 



to challenge herself, acquire 
meaningful relationships, and 



invest her own creativity ir 
everything she does. 



m ^M\ £ 


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Appalachia Volunteers, serving 
as the assistant director his junior 
year and the co-director his senior 
year. Also an Ignacio Volunteer, 
Chris spent two weeks in Tijuana, 
Mexico working at a homeless 
shelter and helping to build a 
school for children. Aside from 
helping those outside 
the country, Chris 
was also a retreat 
leader for a forty- 
eight hour retreat 
weekend for 

freshmen where he 
aided them in 
adjusting to college 
life's challenges, new 
friendships, new 
relationships, and 
new-found freedom. 
For Chris such 
emotional and 
physical challenges 



are 



easier 



to 



accomplish because 
of his strong faith in 
God and through his 
personal belief that 
what each individual 






Stephen J. Antonil 



does with his or her life has ar 
important effect on the world 
With this belief lies Chris 
definition of what it means to b( 
successful. According to Chrii 
success is found when you live i 
fulfilling life. "I don't strive fo 
success," he says, "success is onb 
truly found when it come 
naturally." He has found sucl 
success most often in relationship: 
with other people, like his famib 
and friends. His efforts seem t( 
make the biggest difference oi 
the people who are closest to him 
friends, and fellow volunteer 
have described him as " faithful 
spiritual, strong, honest 
hardworking and compassionate. 
Chris Hunter sees himself a 
someone who cares "a hell of 
lot", and wants to give back a 
much as he can because he's beei 
given so much. 



354 Seniors 



Stephen J. Antonik 



a 



loshan Rajkumar 

In his nomination for 
Outstanding senior Roshan 
Lajkumar was described as "the 
mbodiment of dedication, service 
nd wisdom." His four years 
t Boston College have 
lemonstrated his active 
nvolvement and dedication in 
verything he does. Everything 
hat Roshan becomes involved in 
le becomes engulfed in. He says 
hat he is not satisfied unless he 
luts his best foot forward and has 
xhausted all of his personal 
esources (ie. commitment, 
onnections, compassion and 
onsistency), when he has 
ccomplished that, then he knows 
le has been successful. 

As a four year member of the 
riass Government Council to 
vhich he was elected Senior 
Jaison Officer, Roshan still found 
ime to be a four year member of 
he Salt and Light Company, the 
udicial Board, and the University 
Thorale. 



Amy Pesapane 

"No project is too complex or 
: 00 large for Amy to be willing to 
ake on, even when there are more 
i han a few obstacles," fellow co- 
lirector Rosemary Palumbo said 
bout outstanding senior Amy 
'esapane. 

Amy calls herself "an 
' invironmentalist at heart" and 
ooking at her accomplishments 
his far, it would be difficult to 
iisagree. Amy is a co-director of 
FREE as well as the UGBC 
Environmentalist Issues 

Coordinator. 

She began the recycling effort 
it Boston College as a sophomore 
by urging the BC community to 
recycle plastics and glass, and it 
was Amy who initialized the 
placement of recycling bins in all 
of the dorms and administrative 
buildings. She insists recycling is 
practical and there is no reason 
why someone shouldn't be doing 
it. Her efforts in recycling have 
allowed her to achieve her goal of 
leaving BC a little better than when 
iShe started because she feels BC 



Roshan firmly believes in 
service for others and helping 
the community and he 
has used his 
opportunities at 
BC to do his 
part. He knows 
he has been 
successful in 
achieving his goals 
when he has 
accomplished 
what he set out to 
do and everyone 
involved benefits. 
He insists there is 
nothing like the 
feeling when 
someone you don't 
know or never 
expected to hear 
from says 'thank 
you." 

Roshan has been 
described by his 
peers as being 
"inspirational," 
"strong," 
"unique," and 



has given her so much. 

Amy's desire to change the 
wrongs she sees goes beyond 
recycling at BC. Amy enjoys 
learning about the legal system 
and would like to like to reform 
the flaws she sees and insists she 
won't give up becauseshe is sick 
of things not getting done. 

If there was 
one person who 
has been 

inspirational to her 
over the years it 
would be her 
father. A former 
BC football player 
and high school 
coach, her father. 
Amy feels has 
always been there 
for her family as a 
strong moral 
figure. Amy has 
worked closely 
with her Dad 
through their 
volunteer work 
with the Special 

Olympics to s,ephc„ J. An.o„ik 



genuinely 



'someone who 
concerned for the 
others." When asked how 




would describe himself 
Roshan paused for a 
moment and said, 
"Roshan Rajkumar is 
someone who has 
overcome the loss of a 
loved one, and has 
continued to live up to 
the expectations that his 
father has always had for 
him. He's remained true 
to all those he cares for 
and loves, to which his 
I riends at BC and in B-2 1 
can attest." 



Siephcii J, Anlomk 

which she has volunteered since 
age ten. 

Amy feels that giving back to 
others, and being happy both 
professionally and personally are 
most important to her. She feels 
fortunate that she comes from a 
loving and supportive family 
background, is attending a 



well- rounded university, and 
knows what she wants to do and 
has been given the opportunity to 
do those things. 




Perspectives 355 



Allison M. McGuigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Barbara A. McGuiness 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alison J. McGuire 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher E. McGuire 

School of Management 
Finance 



Daniel R. McGuire 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





Michele B. McGlyn 


John M. Mclnerney 


Laura Mclntyre 


Stephanie A. Mclntyre 


John L. McKee 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Political Science 


Psychology 


Marketing 


English 


Philosophy 








Theology 






d^jiM 



Kevin C. McKeon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Bryan M. McLaughlin 

School of Management 
General Management 




Edward K. McLaughlin John W. McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Communications Political Science 

Political Science 




Edward N. McLoughlin Kathleen M. McMahon Colleen M. McNamara Deborah M. McNamara Kathryn McNamee 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing School of Education School of Education School of Education 

History Nursing Elementary Education Elementary Education Elementary Education 

English Political Science Human Development 




MSM 




Kerry L. McPhee 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



Timothy M. McQuillen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Meghan A. McSorley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael P. McSweeney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristen M. McTeague 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

357 





Michael P. McTighe 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter K. McTighe 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrew B. McVicker 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jeannette C. Meacham 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sarah E, Mead 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Mamatha Medarametla 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel E. Meegan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Heather M. Meeker 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Ann E. Mehl 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Megan W. Mehr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Michael W. Melito 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marco A. Melo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Robert J. Memory 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Andrea J. Mendelson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Paul D. Merolli 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Johanna B. Messina 

School of Management 
Accounting 



John P. Messina 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nicole M. Metz 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Elizabeth M. Meyer 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joshua C. Meyer 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



358 



Jessica M. Meyeringh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Beth-Ann M. 
Meyerowitz 

School of Nursing 
Nursine 



Caroline G. Michaud Christopher L. Mikosh David J. Milano 



School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Theology 



School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




r) 




Sara S. Miles 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Health Science 




Kira L. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Mary T. Miller 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Neal E. Milton 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael A. Mingolelli 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer T. Minish 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mod. Special Needs 



David J. Minker 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



359 




360 Seniors 




Class of 1995 361 




Amy L. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Carey A. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jonathan S. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lynn Beth Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Gautam Mishra 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Michele J. Missan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



*S!M4\<Sr«C«IS* 





Marco A. Molea 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kendra M. Molina 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



Marc A. Molinsky 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michele C. Mollard 

Arts and Sciences 
Communications 



362 



Jennifer J. Molyneaux 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 




Jackson Men 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 




James J. Monge 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




Jennifer K. Mooney 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Jason D. Moore 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Sara E. Moore 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Tim R. Morabito 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 





Brian L. Moran 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Steven V. Moreno 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joseph P. Moran 

Arts and Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 




Dawn M. Morgan 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



Katherine A. Moran 

School of Management 
Finance 




Tara L. Moran 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics 

Spanish 



Jennifer J. Morcone 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




Mary E. Morgan 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



Eileen P. Moriarty 

Arts and Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



James P. Moriarty 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Midori Moriyama 

Arts and Sciences 
Communications 



David P. Morris 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher M. Morrison 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Int. Special 

Needs/Geoscience 



Heather L. Morrison 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Robert F. Morrissey 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



363 




Julie A. Morse 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



English 



Kellianne C. Mortimer 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Tiffany B. Morton 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Carlos A. Motta Felix M. Motta 

School of Management School of Management 
Marketing Marketing 

History 




Kristen M. Moylan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Melissa S. Mueller 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Danny K, Mui 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Daniel Mulgrew 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Deidre C. Mullen 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Tracy C. Mullen 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 



Barret E. Mulligan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Peter J. Mulligan Maura L. Mullins 

School of Management School of Management 

Finance Accounting 
Information System 



Melissa Mulrooney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Barbara A. Munderloh 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 

364 



Corinna A. 
Mundhenk 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Kristin M. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Spanish 



Patricia B. Murphy 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Philip M, Murphy 

School of Management 
Finance 





Shannon M, Murphy Stacey W. Murphy 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

Early Childhood Communications 

Math / Comp. Science 



Tara A. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher F. Murray Kimberly A. Murray 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

Pohtical Science Nursing 




Marie A. Murray Megan A. Murray 

School of Management School of Management 
Information Systems Marketing 



Claire T. Murret 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Michael A. Mustillo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Ashok G. Nachnani 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Stephanie A. Nahass 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Cheryl G. Najarian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Heather L. Najarian 


Akiko Nakano 


Patricia L. Napoli 


Michael Nasser 


Melanie J. Nastri 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Marketing 
Finance 


Psychology 


Political Science 


English 











K. Elizabeth Natter 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Austin R. Naughton 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Maeve K. Naughton 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Christopher P. Neault 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Edgardo A. Negron 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 







Erik C. Nelson 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information System 



Richard S.X. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Carlton E. Nettleton 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 



Robert B. Newman 

School of Management 
Finance 



366 




Brittany M. Newton 


Ka-Man Ng 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Nursing 


Finance 




Economics 




Andy V. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Chau D. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





Hien T. Nguyen 


Lieu Anh K. Nguyen 


Quyn T. Nguyen 


Sy Nguyen 


Tlianh Nga T. Nguyen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Environmental 


Biology 


Marketing 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


Geoscience 













rr^ < 




Hl^HHi^Hfllk 




Lisa A. Nickerson 

School of Management 

General Management 



Jennifer L. Nicolaides 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gregory A. Nieman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John F.Nilan 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Oliver C. Nivaud 

School of Management 
Marketing 



367 




Jf:— '^S^J' 



368 Seniors 




Class of 1995 369 





'■? t^ 



I 




Christopher B. Noon 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Kristie A. Noonan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christine M. Norato 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jason H. Norcross 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Colleen E. Norton 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 




Albertina Noyes 

Evening College 
General Management 



Matthew R. Nozemack 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Trisha A. Nugent 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mod. Special Needs 



Tara B. Nulty 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater 

Economics 



Kathryn M. Nunziata 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Erinn E. O'Boyle 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Bridget K. O'Brien 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joseph M. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kristen L. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Theresa M. O'Brien 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Timothy J. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



370 



Keely J. O'Bryan Caitlin M. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Environmental Geoscience Economics 

Environmental Geoscience 



Denis J. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Luke A. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Mark V. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Kathryn C. O'Connor 

School of Management 



Marketing 



Kerry A. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew J. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 











Megan O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Amanda A. O'Dea 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 






Denise O'Donnell 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



I 



Kerri F. O'Donoghue 


Lauren A. O'Hara 


Emma K. O'Keefe 


Matthew J. O'Keefe 


Meghan F. O'Keefe 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Psychology 


History 


Economics 


English 


Mod. Special Needs 











371 




Sean T. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christian O'Melia 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Matthew M. O'Neil 

School of Management 
Accounting 



William J. O'Neil 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Meaghan S. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erin M. O'Rourke 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



372 



Dawn T. O'Shea 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Kevin A. O'Toole 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Kristin M. Oakes 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Julie A. Obear 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carmen M. Ochoa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mod. Special Needs 



Kimberly C. Ochs 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Laura B. Odachowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Danielle R. Oddo 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 






^U 




Matthew E. Oetgen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Catherine T. Okawa 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tanya K. Oldenhoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kenneth P. Oliva, Jr. 

School of Management 
Finance 



Teresa L. Oliver 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Michael J. Oliveri 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Susan D. Ordman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




373 




Luke A. Orefice 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Manuel A. Orejuela 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Maria-Elena Orejuela 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Jennifer V. Oris 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Robert D. Orlando 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Stanley F. Orszula 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Luis A. Ortega 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Nils E. Ostberg 

School of Management 



Marketing 



Thaddeus M. Ostrowski 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Renee M. Oust 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Christina J. Overland 


Adriana M. Pace 


Graig Paglieri 


Jiwon Paik 


Joseph M. Palamara 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Communications 


English 


Political Science 


Computer Science 


Finance 


Sociology 












374 



Mia J. Palazzo 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



David J. Palmisano 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristen A. Palumbo 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Gayle M. Pandolfo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Agus S. Pangestu 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 





Ann M. Papagno 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 




Christopher J. Parker 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer Parthemore 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Jennifer L. Papp 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Emmanuel P. 
Parasirakis 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Thomas D. Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Enghsh 



dkh 



Charles D. Parker 

School of Management 
Finance 




ncy A. Pasquariello 


David G. Passov 


Tina Pastrana 


Tina D. Patalano 


Mona R. Patel 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Biology 


English 


Human Resources Mgmt. 
Human Develpment 


Political Science 



375 



4 




f^^ 


^■*i\^ .A 




4 


'ftk 




^ 




316 Seniors 





Class of 1995 377 






Sachin Patel 

School of Management 
Finance 



Hillary A. Patrick 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Peter C. Patsourakos 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jaime J. Patterson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joshua A. Paul 

School of Management 
Finance 




Brigitte M. Payette 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Heather E. Peach 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



378 



Rima K. Pechazi 

School of Management 

Information System 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Marilu Peck 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

English 






Stacey L. Peckham 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Angela Pecoraro 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Cherjl L. Pederson 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Benito A. Pedraza 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



i.i *■- 



Alison M. Peer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Tanya L. Peet 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Kevin A. Pellerin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Elizabeth B. Pereira 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 




Tina Peploe 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Arminda A. Perez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Cesar A. Perez-Novoa 


Louise C. Perfetti 


Philip M. Pergola 


Susan M. Pergola 


Joanna E. Pernia 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


English 


Mathematics 


Mod. Special Needs 


Psychology 


Oper.& Strat. Management 


Political Science 









379 





Dalton J. Perras 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kendra L. Perrino 

School of Management 

General Management 

Marketing 




Christopher M. Perry 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 
Computer Science 



Amy L. Pesapane 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





^ik^kM 




Colleen L. Peters 

School of Management 
General Management 



Jennifer L. Peters 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



rian G. Peterson 


Rohan A. Phansalkar 


Neil P. Phelan 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Sociology 


Biology 





^ktiB M^k 



380 



Amanda L. Picard 


Heather A. Piccirilli 


Renata M. Piekielniak 


Bruce M. Pierce 


Christopher T. Pierson 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


English 


Biology 
Psychology 


History 


Political Science 



d^^ 





Keith M. Pietropaolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Frank J. Pigott 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Joseph B. Plurad 


Joanne L. Po 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Chemistry 


Communications 




Political Science 




Frank C. Pompilii 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Information Systems 



Kathleen Ponte 

School of Nursing 



Nursing 



Patricia M. Pimentel 

School of Management 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

Marketing 



Tricia A. Pinho 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristen R. Plishka 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Nicole C. Poirier 


Mark J. Politan 


Nicholas C. Policy 


hool of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


English 


Finance 
Infomiation Systems 



Vincent M. Ponzo Russell M. Pool 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing 





David L. Poppins 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



#1 





George J. Pottanat 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Melisa J. Potty 

Arts & Sciences 
Englisii 



Sean D. Power 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



William A. Powley 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Amy N. Pratt Kristen L. Premerlani 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Finance 



Gina A. Presutto 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Mathew S. Previte 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael D. Prinn 

School of Management 
Accounting 







?:^ 



David J. Prior 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Katherine A. Prior 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



382 




A^ 



Christopher C. 
Promades 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Monika J. Pronczuk 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 





Kristina Przyjemski 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Julie L. Ptashnick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



William A. Pultar 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Marnie L. Purciel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Martha A. Putnam 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



David S. Quackenbush 

School of Management 
Finance 



Scott A. Quattromani 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John S. Quealy 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 



Daniel Putignano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Sarah E. Quebec 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



383 




384 Seniors 




Class of 1995 385 



Laura M. Quedenfeld 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Mark A. Raffinan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Anne E. Rajotte 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jennifer J. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Joseph Racanelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Melissa L. Radford 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Julia M. Rafferty 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 





Roshan N. Rajkumar 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 




Jaime A. Ramirez 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




386 



Juan E. Ramos 

School of Management 

Economics / Finance 

Marketing 



Alexandra I. Ramsteck 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Aruna V. Rangarajan 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Lisa A. Rapaszky 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Tracy Raposa 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 





(,1*^ ^■"' w. 




Anne Marie S. Rath 


Kathleen A. Rau 


Dorien L. Rawe 


Erin C. Razzetti 


Andrew J. Reardon 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Sociology 


Psychology 


Communications 


Accounting 




Jason P. Reblando 


Bethann J. Rechner 


John M. Redmond 


Tannas M. Reed 


Maryann Regan 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


English 


Information Systems 
Marketing 


Accounting 


English 
Psychology 




Michael J. Regan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Judithe Registre 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Made M. Rehbock 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Jennifer L. Red 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Meaghan Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Melissa A. Reilly 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kimberly K. Reinert 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Emily E. Reinys 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Erik H. Reisner 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David E. Rentz 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



387 







Neha P. Reshamwala 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Sociology 



Alejandro Restrepo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



D. Lashon Rhodes 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian J. Richardson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Stephen D. Riden 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



<-'^s«^v^\ 




Michelle M. Riedel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer K. Riedy 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Minerva P. Riego de Dies 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristen V. Rieland 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Information Systems 



Renee M. Riethmiller 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed./Special 

Education/English 




Renee N. Rigolini 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Edwin J. Riley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin J. Riley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Won Young Rim 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Marc Rinaldi 

School of Management 
Finance 




Sherrie Rink 

Evening College 
Accounting 




Amy R. Ritter 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Kari M. Ritz 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Thomas D. Rizza 

School of Management 
Biology 



Jennifer R. Rizzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



388 





Michael Rizzo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer A. Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mark J. Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Melissa Roberts 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child In Society 



Jennifer P. Robertson 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Jennifer C. Robinson 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Jill Robinson 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed./Mod. 
Special Needs/Music 



Diane M. Rocchio 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christian T. Roccia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Leah S. Rochelle 

Evening College 
Psychology 



389 




Christian A. Rodriguez 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Julia E. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Rosalia Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Carla G. Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Susan M. Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Cecilia S. Roh 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Vanessa Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Jimena Rojas 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristen M. Roderick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Michael Rodman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Tanya M. Roenitz ^^ 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Amy E. Rolfe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



390 




Kathleen M. Rollins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Curtis M. Romboli 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bridget Rooney 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




Eileen C. Rooney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kara L. Rooney 

Evening College 
Political Science 




Kathleen M. Rose 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Communications 




Jennifer Rossi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Dara L. Rothenbiller 

School of Management 

Communications 

Marketing 





Erika C. Rosen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer Rosenbach 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Girlaine Rosier 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Alana D. Rossi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





392 Seniors 




Class of 1995 393 



Michael A. Rozman 


Michael M. Rubino 


Thomas S. Rudegeair 


Jessica Ruffen 


Ian D. Rupell 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Science 


Arts & Science 


Finance 


Political Science 


Accounting 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Marketing 












Lauren K. Russell 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 






Tracy A. Russell 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Anthony C. Russo 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 




Giuseppina Russo 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 




Kristine M. Ryan 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Lauren C. Rybicki 

Arts & Science 
English 



Amer M. Saab 

Arts & Science 
History 



James K. Sackie 

Evening College 
Business Management 



Jennifer A. Rutkowski 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special 

Needs/ Human Dev. 




James R. Ryan 


Joanna K. Ryan 


Kevin J. Ryan 


Kevin M. Ryan 


Kimberly K. Ryan 


Arts & Science 


School of Education 


Arts & Science 


Arts & Science 


Arts & Science 


Communications 


Elementary Education 
Sociology 


English 


Political Science 


Political Science 
Spanish 




Anne E. Saleh 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



394 




Lisa M. Salerni 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Matthew A. Salerno 

Arts & Science 
Art History 



Amy E. Saliba 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Cristy L. Salvi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sharon Sam 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 




William D. Sandow Steven F. Santangelo John M. Santo Domingo Cristiana E. Santo Pietro 

School of Management Arts & Science School of Management Arts & Science 



Accounting 



Biology 



Finance 



Political Science 



Lynne M. Santoro 

Arts & Science 
English 



395 



Charles J. Sanzone 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Michelle K. Savage 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Angela C. Savona 

Arts & Science 
English 




Joanne P. Sayers 

School of Management 
Economics / Finance 



Leah J. Sasso 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer M. Sauer 

Arts & Science 
English 



Kendra R. Saunders 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Information Systems 



Donna M. Savage 

Arts & Science 
History 




Barbara J. Scanga 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



Kathleen M. Scanlan 

Arts & Science 
Environmental Geoscience 



396 



Derek M. Scanlon 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Jacqueline R. Schilling 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sandra L. Schneible 


Erika C. Schneider 


Heather A. Schneider 


Kim A. Schuller 


Rebecca L. Schuller 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Biology 


Nursing 


Psychology 


History 




John Schulte 

Evening College 
Accounting 



Kristin A. Schuster 

School of Nursing 
Nursina 



Michael A. Schwartz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Robert L. Schweizer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Steven A. Sciascia 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Amy Sciple 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



Brendan P. Scollans 

School of Management 
Finance 



David M. Scorsolini 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John D. Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Michele Scozzafava 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John M. Segrich 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Andrea M. Seidenthal 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Jeffrey T. Sellinger 

School of Management 
General Management 



Mary Liz Scotti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Anna C. Semansky 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



397 






K> 




Jean M. Serra 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Debby K. Setiawan 

Sciiool of Management 
Economics 



Fifi Setiawaty 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Economics / Finance 



Jennifer A. Sgroi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sean T. Shaffer 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 




■■% 




Anne M. Shaidone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian F. Shanley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Bridget A. Shannon 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



David S. Shapiro 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Ecology 



James W. Shaw 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Keith C. Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Megan A. Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Paul T. Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sterling T. Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




C) 



immim' '"" 



50STON COLLECi 



Caroline H. Sherman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Robert J. Sherman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ann K. Shimamoto 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Kara J. Shipulski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Colleen P. Shire 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Adele C. Sicilia 


Lizmarielly Sicilia 


Jodi Sieben 


Cory M. Silva 


John R. Silvia 


Arts & Sciences 


Hernandez 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


School of Management 
General Mgmt./ Marketing 


Nursing 


Communications 
Economics 


Political Science 



399 




400 Seniors 




Class of 1995 401 



William Sim 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle L. Simon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Danielle M. Simonelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Joshua S. Singewald 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian V. Siracusa 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Tyler R. Sloat 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Justin E. Slobig 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Suzanne K. Smetana 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Douglas T. Smith 



David M . Smith 

Evening College 
Business Administration Business Administration 



Evening College 



Eamon Smith 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Bradley P. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
German 




# 



Edward L. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brian S. Smith 

School of Management 
Finance 




Erica K. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Gregory J. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



402 



Regina F. Smith 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod.Special 

Needs/Spanish 



Scott A. Smith 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alysa N. Snipas 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Akie M. So 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Laurie Soden 


Shin H. Soh 


Nicole Solis 


Renee Somma 


Vanhphenh C. 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Somsichack 


Economics 


Economics 


English 


Finance 


School of Nursing 


Strat. & Oper. Mgmt. 


Philosophy 




Marketing 


Nursing 





Jemma SJ. Song 


Conan SooHoo 


Tzeitel Sorrosa 


Anna M. Sousa 


Watid Sou SSou 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Asian Studies 


Accounting 


Studio Art 


French 


Biochemistry 




Michael Sparrow 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Susan E. Spear 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




403 




Maura N. Spellman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christopher N. Speranzo Kimberly A. Spiessbach 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Political Science Marketing 



Louis A. Spina 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lawrence P. Sposato 

School of Management 
Finance 




£j£. 



Daniel J. Spychalsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Richard H. Stahmer 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 





Shannon C. Squire 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




La-keisha R. Staliings 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Margaret M. Standing 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Richard J. Stanley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Christopher J. Starke 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael K. Steen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kurt R. Steinkrauss 

School of Management 
Accounting 



404 




Christopher P. Stenmon 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Economics 



Courtney B. Stevens 

School of Management 
Finance 



k 




Lisa A. Stevens 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Bethany W. Stewart 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



MaM 



James C. Stewart 

School of Management 



Economics 



.rt^ 






Amy E. Stinson 


Susannah R. Stone 


Amy E. Strakosch 


John G. Stretton 


Christopher D. Strunk 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Early Childhood 


Early Childhood 


English 


English 




Human Development 


Human Development 




Political Science 




Courtland A. Sturgis 

School of Management 
Finance 



MeUa Suherman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher P. Sullivan Christopher S. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Sociology Biology 



Claire M. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kenneth J. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mary E. Sullivan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Sarah L. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

French 



Sean P. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Shannon E. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



405 



Melissa M. Supler 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ana Maria Suris 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Stephen M. Susann 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Amy B. Sutherland 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



Cheryl A. Swanson 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jennifer L. Swanson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Adrianne L. Swenda 

School of Management 
Finance 




Allison K. Swezey 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Edward S. Swidey 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 








Arthur P. Swift 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



406 



Karen E. Swift 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

French 



Ryan J. Swift 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Phitsamay 
Sychitkokhong 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Donna E. Szczechowicz 

Evening College 
Business Administration 





zemyslaw Szymczyk 


Dannv S. Taha 


Laina A. Takafuji 


Gregory Takvorian 


Heather L. Talbott 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Biology 


Finance 


Marketing 


Biochemistry 


Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 


Computer Science 








Needs/Science 





Christian J. Talma 

School of Management 
Finance 



Taralee Tangney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Sara Tappan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Ochioza Tavares 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Yigit Tavukcuoglu 


Kathryn E. Taylor 


Lisa G. Taylor 


Mark D. Taylor 


Michael Taylor 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Elementary Education 


Sociology 


Studio Art 


Economics 


Finance 


Math / Computer Science 






Political Science 



407 




408 Seniors 




Class of 1995 409 






Margaret E. Teliska 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Wei C. Teng 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Shelley A. 1 erault 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy A. Teter 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Laurie A. Teunisen 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Spanish 





Truongson N. Thai 

School of Management 
Economics 




Manoj Thakker 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 







410 



Lisa N. Thaniel 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Pericles Thanopoulos 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 



Nicole Theberge 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Nancy L Theodore 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Zillie M. Theodorou 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



K» ^ 






Greg J. Theriault 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Jennifer L. Thibeault 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher M. Tholi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Gregory R. Thomaier 

School of Management 



Marketing 



Carrie A. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 






Elizabeth M. Thomas 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Health Science 



Joan M. Thompson 

School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Lori A. Thornton 

School of Nursing 
Nursina 



Amy A. Thurlow 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mark E. Tibbetts 

Evening College 
Accounting 







Marie Anne Tieri 

School of Management 

Economics 

hitemational Studies 



Michael Tilbury 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Nicole C. Tillyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Margaret A. Tilton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Angelica M. Tinio 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 





Maricar R. Tinio 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Courtenay L. Tischer 

School of Management 
General Management 



Krista M. Tokarz 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Connie Y. Tom 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer Tonzola 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



411 





Ann C. Toohey 


Mario Torchia 


Julie A. Torpy 


Deborah K. Tortola 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Human Resource Mgmt. 


English 


English 






Psychology 


Sociology 





Md^ 



Sarah E. Townend 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael F. Tramonte 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Erik J. Tratnyeli 

School of Management 

Finance 
Informational Systems 



Terri L. Trespicio 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Ana P. Tostado 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Leigh S. Trimmier 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Trang Trinh 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Carolyn M. Troy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



412 




Anita E. Tsen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 
Mathematics 




Virgilio A. Tuazon, Jr. 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Erin M. Tullocli 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 




Marc - Philippe Tuscher 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher Twomey 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Patricia A. Tully 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Erin L. Twomey 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Linda M. Turcotte 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Kathryn Tynan 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Sharon E. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Craig W. Tyndale 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 

413 





Marcie K. Uemura 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 



Rebecca L. Ulisse 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



David J. Umbricht 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Tracey J. Urell 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Sonia R. Ursino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Monet M. Uva 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

EngHsh 



Albert Glenn B. Uy 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Virak Uy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Georgia N. Vagenas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Heather M. Vaile 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Loren P. Valentine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Danielle B. Valentini 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stefanie S. Valentini 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elise A. Valenty 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Laura A. Valeri 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




414 



Janet P. Van Cuyk 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Kimberly R. Van Daley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John Vander Vennet 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jonathan R. Vanica 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jayme J. Varao 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeffrey T. Varsalone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ravi T. Vasandani 

School of Management 
General Management 



David L. Vaughan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Michelle Vega 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Enrique J. Vela 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 




Amy L. Venezia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer Vernaglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Enrico Jay A. Verzosa 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Dan S. Vidaic 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Edmar V. Vieira 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Accounting 

415 




416 Seniors 




Class of 1995 417 



Michael C. Vile 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sellina B. Villa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Juan M. Villafranca 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Justin A. Villepigue 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Travis E. Vincent 

School of Management 
Finance 





4i^d 



Cindy Vink 


Stephen F. Vitiello 


Frank J. Vitolo 


Nadia Vizioli 


Gregory A. Vlahos 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


temational Studies 


Philosophy 


Political Science 


English 


Finance 





Mary R. Vogt 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Dina A. Vonderhorst 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeanine M. Volpe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Arthur W. Voute 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Alexandra Voutiritsas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy C. Waananen 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Laura A. Waclawik 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Mike J. Walczak 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 





Mary Kaye Waldron 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel C. Walent 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Anna E. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Brian J. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy E. Walker 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer A. Wall 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Deborah L. Walsh 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Elizabeth C. Walsh 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Tracy E. Wallace 

Arts & Sciences 

Geology 

Geophysics 




Mary Ellen Walsh 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



419 



Maureen R. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Shane E. Walsh 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Victoria A. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ching C. Wang 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Elizabeth L. Wang 

School of Management 
Finance 




Colleen M. Ward 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Paul J. Ward 

School of Management 



Marketing 



Kelly C. Warrick 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Leah M. Wasnewsky 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Barbra J. Watson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kateri S. Watson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Timothy J. Watson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kimberly G. Waugh 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Deidre J. Waz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John W. Webber 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kenneth J. Weber 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



420 



Theodore T. Webster 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Jewon Wee 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 
Economics 





Shelley A. Weinand 

Arts & Sciences 

Spanish 

Sociology 



Robert L. Weinsheimer 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 







Elizabeth B. Weiss 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kathleen A. Welch 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Samantha Wellum 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kristin N. Welsh 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Tamara N. Werntz 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 




Bruno J. West 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Tiffani D. West 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 





Gregory H. West 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jenna L. Westergren 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Michelle E. Wetter 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Math/Comp. Science 



Kerry A. Whalen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Scott R. Wheeler 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Alexander M. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jonathan C. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



421 




Christopher K. 
Whitmore 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Emerson M. Wickwire 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Craig Wide 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Angela D. Wiesner 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Krista M. Wilbur 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 





422 



Katherine E. Wille 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Christine M. Williams 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Kevin D. Williams 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eric S. Willis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jacy L. Wilson 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 





Karen L. Wilson 


Thomas B. Wilson 


Jennifer M. Windie 


Maura J. Winson 


Adam P. Winthrop 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Psychology 


English 


Communications 


Economics 




I Christine A. Wischusen 

School of Education 

Mod. Special Needs 

Psychology 



Sunny Jy Wong 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Violet I. Wolejszo 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



James M. Woltmann 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin Wong 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Patrick Wong 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Thomas P. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




423 




424 Seniors 




Class of 1995 425 






Abigail L. Wood 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



John E.Wood 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Christine E. Woods 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jelenne E. Wright 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Kevin Wu 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



English 





Kevin D. Wyndham 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




^Ik 



Jonathan L. Yalmokas 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Marketing 






Martin O. Yalcin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 




Mari Yamamura 

School of Education 
Human Development 




426 



Becky I. Yang 


Desiree C. Yao 


Tracy L. Yarde 


Shahnaaz B. Yasin 


Joelle N. Yearwood 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Accounting 


Human Development 


Accounting 


English 


English 











Hilary B. Yeaw 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 



Ada Yim 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jcannie C. Yiu 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jenni K. Yoshida 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Suk Hyun Youh 

School of Management 
Finance 





f 





di^ dMAi^ 




Wt\ 



leather A. Young 


Jonathan E. Young 


Jonathan M. Young 


Michael C. Young 


Scott A. Young 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Political Science 
French 


Accounting 
Economics 


Communications 




o 



li 




Alice T. Yuan 


Richard M. Yung 


Nickolas M, Zaderej 


Jason C. Zambuto 


Carolyn S. Zarillo 


School of Management 


Evening College 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Business Administration 


Marketing 


Finance 
Marketing 


English 




Christian M. Zawacki 


Kari A. Zbikowski 


Allison J. Zeinoun 


Joshua Ziac 


Drew L. Zielinski 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Elementary Education 


English 


English 


Accounting 


Economics 


English 






Finance 


Finance 

A n 



All 





Vanessa T. Zieike 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Alexandra Zilberman 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Englisii 



Alana K. Zimmerman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mary V. Zlotnik 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Raul A. Zolezzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Roula Zreik 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Deborah A. Zucaro 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Adam S. Zuckerberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Diana Bannan 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed/Mod. Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



Richard N. Blackwood 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Marguerite M. Brackley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 









Jeff Campbell 

School of Management 
Finance 



428 




Casandra Gomez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David Hartnett 

Sciiool of Management 
Marketing 



Bernadette Maglione 

School of Management 

Economics 

Italian 



David N. Pasquantonio 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katie Zorrilla 

School of Management 

Marketing/Operations 

& Strategic Mgmt. 



429 



Sarah R. Abbriizzese 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Sherine M. Abdul-Hadi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Frederic Adams 

Evening College 
Management 

Ellen Ahearn 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Tresanne Ainsworth 

Evening College 
English 



Yaeko M. Arnsdorff 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 
Brian Aube 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Pierre E. Auguste 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Alexander T. Austin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Christopher J. Austin 

Arts &. Sciences 
History 



Jonathan C. Beaulieu 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jeffrey D. Beckley 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Peter M. Blaisdell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Leonard Blanchette 

Evening College 
Management 

Mark A. Botti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John M. Brinkman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Scott R. Brown 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 

Steven D. Bruner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Karmaia C. Brunson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Philip A. Burr 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nancy E. Cardinal 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 

Rita Carey 

Evening College 
Management 

Daniel Carney 

Evening College 
Marketing 

Erin E. Carroll 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Marie Carroll 

Evening College 
Information Processing 



Mohammed T. Al Sharif 

School of Management 
Finance 

Alexander Alexakos 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Beth A. AUsopp 

Alts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Paul G. Altidor 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jann Amato 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Christine Amiro 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Stephen R. Anders 

Alts & Sciences 
Communications 

Sotiris Angelakis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Milagros F. Arbaje 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Gunther Armbruster 

Evening College 
History 

Lauren Arnel 

Evening College 
Management 



Kenneth S. Avalos 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Friederike Baer-Wallis 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Doreen A. Balbuena 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Sean Baker 

Evening College 
Communications 

Naveen Ballem 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Steven M. Ballerene 

School of Management 
Finance 

Eugenia Barges 

Evening College 
Communications 

Lawrence Bastianelli 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Michael J. Bauer 

Arts & Sciences 

Histoiy 

Philosophy 

Jean Beattie 

Evening College 
English 

Maria Betro 

Evening College 
Management 



Debra BoufTard 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Psychology 

Michele Boutin 

Evening College 
Mangement 

Carla Boyd 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Mark Brambilla 

Evening College 
Management 

Alison F. Bradley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Dana J. Brass 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Kimberly A. Brennan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

William Brearley 

Evening College 
History 



Aimee E. Brewer 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Michelle M. Briand 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Teresa Brindle 

Evening College 
Accounting 



Lori Bussey 

Evening College 
Management 

Christopher W. Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

David Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

David M. Butters 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Michael Byron 

Evening College 
Management s^ 



Kevin J. Cadle 

Alts & Sciences 
History 

David Callaghan 

Evening College 
Management 

Kathleen Callahan 

Evening College 
English 

Christopher M. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Robert G. Canavan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications j^ 

Deborah Canty 

Evening College 
Management 



Crystal C. Carvotta 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Carlos Casas 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Francis Casey 

Evening College 
Economics 

Souheil Chahwane 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 

Kenny G. Chau 

School of Management 
^-. General Management 

Catherine G. Chen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Sonyi Chong 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 

Sue Yee Chow 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Nora Chu 

Evening College 
Communication 

Rebecca Chui 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Dong Soo Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



430 Seniors 



Joshua B. Clement 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Rachel Coble 

Evening College 
Management 

Eileen P. Codyer 

, ^rts & Sciences 
I History 

{ 

' .Amanda H. Cole 

I School of Nursing 

! Nursing 

! ^ 

I Vlary B. Coleman 

' School of Nursing 
Vursing 

Douglas C. Coles 

j Arts & Sciences 
! Sistor>' 



::harles Collins 

I Evening College 
nformation Processing 



Kristen A. Collins 

School of Management 
'inance 

Vlichael G. Collins 

' \rts & Sciences 

' Political Science 

I 
I 

jisa Colon 

>chool of Education 
Elementary Education 
Zhild in Society 

nieen Conroy 

ivening College 
Management 

Vnthony Comer 

>chool of Education 
^uman Development 

>arah J. Cooke 

khool of Management 
-■inance 

jiail A. Cooney 

khool of Nursing *.* 
Nursing - 

Claude Corbeil 

I Evening College 

I (nformation Processing 

I Management 

I 

i Carolyn Corretti 

j^rts & Sciences 

I English 

I 

I 

I Christine Corretti 

I Arts & Sciences 

' English 



Craig A. Corsetti 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Sean Craven 

Evening College 
Management 

Erin Croft 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Jeanne Cronin 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Neil Cronin Jr. 

Evening College 
Management 

Ann Culhane 

Evening College 
English 

Erin K. Cumming 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Kelly A. Cunningham 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 

William E. Cunningham 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Shelly H. Curran 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Maureen A. Curtin 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Jane Cybulski 

Evening College 
Management 

Christine D'Angelo 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Anthony C. De Heinrich 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Thomas J. De Rosa 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 

Kevin Danahy 

Evening College 
Psychology 



Carole Davis 

Evening College 
Management 

Christopher J. Dean 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Andre DeCasteja 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Rebecca E. Dee 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy ^j 

English ^^ 

Keith A. Dejesus 

School of Management 
Economics 

Dora Del Gizzi 

Evening College 
English 

Paul Delia Barba 

Evening College 
Management 

Otto Delacruz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Liz Delgado 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Tracey Dellaria 

Evening College 
Management 

Joshua Delman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jason Demark 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Joseph Devlin 

Evening College 
Management 

Jason A. Deutsch 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Raymond Dicecca 

Evening College 
Management 

Jarrod T. DiTranco 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Maris L. DiTolla 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Gregg Dixon 

Evening College 
Information Processing 
Management 

Timothy Doheny 

Evening College 
Sociology 

Ann Dolan 

Evening College 
Management 

Robert Donofrio 

Evening College 
Management 

John V. Doria 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Theater Arts 

Elizabeth Dority 

Evening College 
History 

Christopher S. Dorment 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Shawn M. Dornan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Ellen E. Dorsey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Rachel Dow 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
English 

James Doyle 

Evening College 
Management 

Deborah A. Driscoll 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Brenda D. Duane 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 
Marketing 

Wanda M. Dubon 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
French 

Donald W. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kevin Duffy 

Evening College 
Management 

Rebecca Duvall 

Evening College 
Psychology 

Shervin Eftekhari-Asl 

Arts & Sciences 
Histoiy 

Brian Ellis 

Evening College 
Communications 

Dorothy Elms 

Evening College 
English 

Emeka Enu 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Courtland E. Fable 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Paul Fahey 

Evening College 
Management 

Lenore C. Fauliso 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 

Lawrence Fennelly 

Evening College 
Management 

Carlos Fermo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Gail Firla 

Evening College 
Management 

Natasha Filipovic 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Triantafillos Fillos 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Robert D. Fiorentino 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Brian G. Flanagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Class of 1995 431 




432 Seniors 




Class of 1995 433 



Dane O. Fletcher 


Maryann Ghantous 


Thuc Nhuoc Lan Ha 


Jenna Holmgren 


Elizabeth K. Iwanowsk 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Accounting 


Art History 


English 


Philosophy 


Sociology 












Robert U. Giannini 


Harry H. Haladjian 


James Hogan 


Shahin Jabbari 


Robert Boyes Ford 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Philosophy 


Philosophy 


Finance 


Communications 




Psychology 








Joy Gignac 




Sarah G. Hong 


Christopher Jaggi 


Rachael Forster 


Evening College 


Edward Hall 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Evening College 


English 


Evening College 


Psychology 


Management 


Social Science 




Management 








Joanna Gilllis 




Matt D. Hopps 


Matthew J. Janiga 


Janet Foscaldo 


Evening College 


Kimberly D. Halleran 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Evening College 


Accounting 


School of Management 


English 


Marketing 


English 


Nancy Gilroy 


Accounting 


Theology 


Carly Jean Francois 


Patrick John Foy 


Evening College 


Cami Hamlon 


Melissa House 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Management 


Evening College 


Evening College 


Nursing 


Economics 




Political Science 


Management 




Political Science 


Lorraine Goffredo 






Karl F. Jensen 




Evening College 


April R. Hanlon 


Kevin A. Hrobowski 


School of Management 


Matthew J. Freitas 


Accounting 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Arts & Sciences 




Secondary Education 


Sociology 




Spanish 


Karim A. Gorayeb 


Spanish 




Marise Joas 




School of Management 




Haixuan M. Huang 


Evening College 


Marco A. Frigeri 


Marketing 


Duncan J. Harvey 


Arts & Sciences 


Management 


Arts & Sciences 




School of Management 


Economics 




Economics 


Michael Gore 


Finance 




Katherine A. Johanek 




Evening College 




Kara A. Hughes 


School of Education 


Jeffrey R. Gagne 


Accounting 


Paul Haughton 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Arts & Sciences 




Evening College 


English 


Communications 


Psychology 


Michael Gravel 


Political Science 








Evening College 




Thomas Hunter 


Linda Johnson 


Marc Gainsboro 


Accounting 


Linda Hayes 


Evening College 


Evening College 


Evening College 




Evening College 


Mangement 


English 


Economics 


Robert P. Grazioso 


English 








Arts & Sciences 




Cindy Hwang 


Renee Jones 


Jennifer Gallagher 


History 


Lynn E. Hendricks 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


School of Management 


Philosophy 


School of Nursing 


Computer Science 


Management 


Marketing 




Nursing 






Spanish 


Emily E. Green 




Cayley Hyers 


Kimberly M. Jonis 




School of Nursing 


Christopher H. Herr 


Evening College 


School of Nursing 


Georgia Ganjeh 


Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Nursing 


School of Management 




History 






General Management 


John Greene 




Michael J. Hynansky 


Nancy Joseph 




Evening College 


Gregory T. Hicks 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Angela R. Garcia 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Nursing 


School of Nursing 




Economics 






Nursing 


Luisa Greselin 


% 


Marina latropoulos 


Kevin T. Juenke 




School of Manageinent 


I^obert Hines 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Henri-Robert Gautier 


Finance g^;;;^,^ 


Evening College 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing iHK 


Accounting 






Mathematics 






Sean Igoe 


Richard Jung 




Gregory A. Grice 


Eugene Ho 


Evening College 


School of Management 


Sean Gavin 


School of Management 


School of Management 


English 


Accounting 


Evening College 


General Management 


Information Systems 




Finance || 


Social Science. ,»»», ~ 




Marketing 


Stephanie A. Interbartolo 




Cecilia A. Gutierrez 




Arts & Sciences 


Rebecca J. Kamp 


Angela Gendron 


Arts & Sciences 


Steve Hoffman 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Sociology 


Evening College 




Political Science 


Social Science 




English 


Sean C. Ivery 

Arts & Sciences 






Manuel A. Guzman 




Joelle E. Kane 


Antoun Ghantous 


Arts & Sciences 


Katharine A. Hoffmann 


Environmental Geoscience 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


History 


Arts & Sciences 




Computer Science 


Management »; 


Spanish 


English 'jU| 


L 


French 



mors 



Jody Kaplan 

School of Nursing 
. Nursing 

Gregory Kay 

i Evening College 
I Management 

Jeffrey Kay 

1 Evening College 

! Management 

j 

I Paula Taylor Kearns 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Kathleen A. Kehoe 

i Arts & Sciences 
English 

Brian E. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Peter M. Kendall 

School of Management 
I Marketing 

i 
James Kendrick 

Evening College 

I Management 

John Keogh 

j Evening College 
I Management 

: Robin Keough 

Evening College 
Social Science 

I Vlichael J. Kerrigan 

^rts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Scott Kidd 

Evening College 
Management 

Catherine S. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 

i Jung H. Kim 

i Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 

I Brian King 

, Evening College 
Management 

I Timothy L. Kingsbury 

j Alts & Sciences 
, English 



Ryan J. Kirwin 

School of Management 
Finance 

Kristen M. Klaus 
School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Jean-Pierre Knight 

School of Management 
Finance 

Gino Korompis 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Marketing 

Tom Krentzin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jason A. Kuuskraa 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Mathematics 

Michael La Foley 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Scott La Grand 

Evening College 
English 

Pui L. Lam 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Richard Lane 

Evening College 
History 

Dorothy M. Lange 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Stanley F. Lanzano 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Gordon Laro 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Guinevere A. Latta 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Matthew M. Lauer 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 
Michael J. Laureno 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Lisa A. Lavita 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Robin A. Le Cain 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Christine LeBlanc 

Evening College 
Management 

Irene LeBlanc 

Evening College 
English 

Jose Ledesma 

Evening College 
Finance 

Brendan M. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Hwa Seung Lee 

School of Management 
General Management 

Hyuk Jin Lee 

School of Management 
Information Systems 

Jennifer W. Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Peggy Y. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Young Jae Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 

William E. Leetch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Charles Leinas 

Evening College 
Psychology 

James F. Lennon 

School of Management 
Finance 

Terry-Lynn Lepore 

Evening College 
English 

Mary K. Libonate 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Lin Lim 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Eric K. Lin 

School of Management 
General Management 
Marketing 

Aimee K. Lins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Amy E. Logue 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 

Kosit Lohawatanakul 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jonathan A. Lombrardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Terri Long 

Evening College 
Philosophy 

Joseph Lopatka 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 
Mathematics 

Francisco Lopez 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Jessica Loraditch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Matthew G. Lotty 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Elizabeth A. Louney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Ari A. Lurie 

Arts & Scieiiges , 
History;: 

Mariska Lutz 

Evening College 
Management 

Thehoang C. Luu 

School of Management 
Computer Science 
Information Systems 

Meg Lyskawa 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kerri MacNaught 

Evening College 
Communications 

Matthew MacNevin 

Evening College 
Accounting 

David Madden 

Evening College 
Management 

John Madfis 

Evening College 
Political Science 

Khurram Malik 

School of Management 
Finance 

James F. Maloney 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Michael Mann 

Evening College 
English 

Lisa Maroni 

Evening College 
Italian 

Paul H. Mazon 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Karen J. Marchitto 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 

Robert M. Marhula 
School of Management 
Accounting 
Information Systems 

Julie A. Marinilli 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Spanish 

John F. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Matthew P. Martens 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Jose L. Martinez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Class of 1995 435 



Maritza Martinez 

Evening College 
Management 

Courtney Massicott 

Evening College 
Management 

Reginald R. Maton III 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian T. McDonald 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Candace McDonough 

Evening College 
Management 

Cheryl McDowell 

Evening College 
Management 



Leah Menzies 

Evening College 
Communication 

Stephen Merchant 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Lisa Merrill 

Evening College 
Management 



Helio O. Monteiro 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Domingo A. Moreira 

Finance 

Oper. & Strat. Magmt. 

Anthony Mosley 

Evening College 
Communications 



Laura E. Nestor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Julie S. L. Ng 

General Management 
Infomational Systems 

Vu A. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jonathan D. Matthews 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Kerri Maus 

Evening College 
Management 

Paul Mazzocca 

Evening College 
Infoimation Processing 

Okey Mbawuike 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Alan McAdams 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Richard V. McAllister 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Shaun M. McCarron 

School of Management 
Finance 
Information Systems 

Edward H. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Heather M. McCarthy 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 

Lynn A. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Arthur F. McCormick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Cara E. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Neil P. McDevitt 

Alts & Sciences 
History 



-eniors 



Michele B. McGlyn 

Arts & Sciences 

Enghsh 

Philosophy 

David McGovern 

Evening College 
Psychology 

Tara McGrath 

Evening College 
American Studies 

Jason G. McHugh 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Carol Mclntyre 

Evening College 
Management 

Brenda Mclsaac 

Evening College 
Management 

Mary D. McKenna 

Arts & Sciences 
French 

Daniel J. McMuUen 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Brian J. McNeill 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Patricia Mead 

Evening College 
English 

Michael P. Meere 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Brian Melket 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Cindy Mellace 

Evening College 
Management 

Jewel Mendoza 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer Merryman 

School of Management 
Information Systems 
Marketing 

Mark E. Mezzanotte 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Karen J. Miceli 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Child in Scoiety 

Michael A. Middleton 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Kristen M. Milano 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Kelly A. Millon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Norman E. B. Minnear 

Alts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Philosophy 

Cheryl Miola 

Evening College 
English 

Laura A. Mirisola 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Kristen R. Mitchell 

History 

Secondary Education 

William G. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Megan P. Molinaro 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Stacey J. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Katherine Mouris 

Evening College 
Social Science 

Andrew G. Muccigrosso 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Mary-Beth Muckian 

Evening College 
Social Science 

Judy S. Mui 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Andrew Mulligan 

Evening College 
Social Science 

Marybeth Mullins 

Evening College 
Management 

Jose J. Munoz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Wilson Munoz 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 

Jeffrey Nautaupsky 

Evening College 
Accounting 

Evanthia Nassias 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Regina Nax 
Arts & Sciences 
History 

Catherine M. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Katherine Nelson 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Vladimir V. Neri 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kristen Nicolella 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Anna L. Nielsen 

Arts & Sciences 

Enghsh 

Philosophy 

Melissa A. Niro 
School of Management 
Accounting 

Allen Niukian 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Jeremy D. Nurse 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Bridget A. O'Boyle 

Arts & Sciences 
English >^ 



Sean M. O'Bryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Enghsh 

Elizabeth O'Hara 

Evening College 
Management 



1 

I 



Kevin O'Leary 

School of Management I 
Marketing | 

I 
Thomas O'Mara | 

Evening College I 

Management ,| 

Nina N. Obichere ^ 

School of Nursing ^ 

Nursing I 

Jennifer A. Ogren J 

Arts & Sciences ^ J| 

Psychology ~M 

Emmanuel Okonkwo | 

Evening College 1^ 
Management ^» 



Barbara Oliveri 

Evening College 
Communications 



Jacquelyn Orlandino 


Michael Peroni 


Colleen Mary Porch 


Theresa Rezzuti 


Danita Scrlbner 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Evening College 


General Management 


Computer Science 


Communications 


American Studies 


Management 


Simone Oscoff 


Constantinos Persakis 


Joshua K. Porter 


Jeannette Richard 


Zachary R. Shankle 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Communication 


English 
Political Science 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Peter Ossenbach 


Mark Perra 




David Ritchie 


Meagan C. Shanley 


School of Management 


Evening College 


Cara Power 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


General Management 


Management 


Evening College 
English 


Information Processing 


Communications 


Daniel A. Paduck 


Justin M. Perrotta 




Jason Robinson 


Prudence Shorton 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


James Power 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


English 


Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 


Evening College 
Management 


Economics 


English 


Maria E. Pallza 


Timothy W. Perrotti 




James M. Robles 


Peter Silver 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Korey Arthur Prefontaine 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Biology 


Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 




Accounting 








Jonathan R. Peters 




Matilda M. Rosa 


C. Warren Skillman 


Rosemary C. Palumbo 


Arts & Sciences 


Karen Prior 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Evening College 


Unclassified 


Management 


English 




History 








Matthew D. Petersen 




John Rosenfeld 


Jeffrey R. Skruck 


"Philippe A. Pamphile 


Arts & Sciences 


Bozena Putanec 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


History 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Political Science 




Spanish 








Robert P. Petrucelli 




Adam John Rosser 


Michael Sleeman 


James B. Panther 


Arts & Sciences 


Mika 0. Pyyhkala 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Human Resource Mgmt. 


Psychology 


Management 


Finance 












Hong N. Pham 


Theresa M. Queally 


Alicia C. Roth 


Adrienne E. Slusky 


Richard Park 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Nursing 


Sociology 


English 


Economics 


Information Systems 








Philosophy 




Scott A. Radway 


Denise Rush 


Irene Smerling 




Francis Pilecki 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Evening College 


t Teddy J. Park 


Evening College 


English 


Economics 


Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Management 








Sociology 




Eric Raffi 


Joshua E. Russell 


Aryoso W. Soegiarso 




Peter C. Plaia 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Jennifer E. Parker 


School of Management 


Computer Science 


Sociology 


Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 


School of Nursing 


Finance 








Nursing 




Edward J. Recinto 


Jeffrey M. Ryan 


Christopher Sorce 


•■ 


Patricia Piatt 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Lisa R. Patrizio 


Evening College 


English 


Communications 


History 


School of Education 


Psychology 








Secondary Education 




Richard Reddy 


Jennifer Ryan 


Marc C. Soucy 


English 


Melanie T. Plihal 


Evening College 


Evening College 


School of Management 


!■■«» 


School of Management 


Information Processing 


Psychology 


Marketing 


Sutee J. Pearce 


Finance 








Arts & Sciences 




Scott Reed 


John Salemme 


Ryan Sperry 


Psychology 


Monica Poirier 


Evening College 


Evening College 


Philosophy 




Evening College 


Management 


Political Science 


Sociolgy 


Rob Penswick 


Accounting 








Evening College 




Michael D. Regenye 


Aaron Saludo 


Eileen Stambaugh 


Psychology 


Joanne Ponte 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 




Evening College 


English 


Psychology 


English 


Glenford L. Perez 


English 


Psychology 






Arts & Sciences 






Kristina A. Scholwin 


Steven Steinmetz 


Economics 


Syamruk T. 


Regina Ressin 


School of Management 


Evening College 




Poomprakobsri 


Evening College 


General Management 


Management 


Julie Perniola 


Arts & Sciences 


English 






Evening College 


Economics 


"^•^sig^ 


^^^ 




English 






"■WSj:-, 





Class of 1995 437 




438 Seniors 





^S?.%EPi""^tfl 



Zl 



^^ ^^^JMQ^^^w'*'' 



r^^^^ 



Class of 1995 439 



Rebecca Stember 

Evening College 
Management 

Andrea Stuart 

Evening College 
Management 

Katherine M. Stratton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Gloria Sullivan 

Evening College 
Management 

Kathryn Sullivan 

Evening College 
Management 

Pamela A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Paul Sullivan 

Evening College 
Management 

Kristen Sybertz 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Donna Szcezechowicz 

Evening College 
Management 

Paul J.H. Tao 

School of Management 
General Management 

Rebecca E. Tarby 

School of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 

Andrew W. Taylor 

School of Management 

Economics 

Oper. & Strat. Management 



Megan E. Taylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 

Wayne Taylor 

Evening College 
Psychology 

Matthew F. Teague 

Alts & Sciences 

Physics 

Eric P. Tennessen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 

John Tessel 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Jennifer Thomas 

Evening College 
Philosophy 

Nathan O. Thomas 

School of Management 
Finance 

William Thompson 

Evening College 
Infonnation Processing 
Mamagement 

Ellen M. Toole 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Child in Society 

Edward Toomey 

Evening College 
Management 

Thuhang N. Tran 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Robert V. Trifone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Charles A. Towbridge 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Kathryn Tschirn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Sophia Tziavas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Haroula Tzouvelis 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Anton A. 
Vantroostenburg 

School of Management 
Computer Science 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 

Peter J. Varsamis 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Julie A. Vondung 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

John Walker 

Evening College 
History 

Mark C. Wallace 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Denis Walsh 

Evening College 
Information Processing 

Matthew T. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Maureen R. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sean Walsh 

Evening College 
Management 

Ann-Chia Wang 

Finance 

Marketing 

Psychology 

John W. Wangler 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Patrick Ward 

Evening College 
Social Science 

Michael E. Weiss 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

David Wells 

Evening College 
Management 

Christopher J. Whitley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Dustin Whitney 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Victoria Wilkins 

Evening College 
Communications 

Kenneth Wilkinson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Charles A. Willhoit 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Michael Williams 

Evening College 
Management 



Rebecca Wimberly 

Alts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Alberta Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Eric C. Wong 

School of Management 
General Management 

Matthew Wy Wong 
School of Management 
Finance 
Marketing 

Patrick T. Wong 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Matthew Woods 

Evening College 
Management j 

Stephen N. Woodside 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Richard J. Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Kevin Wu 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Nicole Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Sheri Young 

Evening College 
History 

Valerie Zolezzi 

French 
Political Science 



440 Seniors 



T:he Circle ofl^jr^ 



lev^f 






,.^-rt^''^' 



(,, «f« ^^"'■^ '" '''' ''"'" ''"> ever i, ^^ 



,,fc ^n ^miing In the circ le, m t/„ ^^^" ^^e,,.^ 




■'5'^ ■"/ocf puv u,„4ssj> i(inou\l r^" 



,i'iS" 



Mary Kaye Waldron 



September 19, 1972 -April 15, 1995 



1 




1 








Attitude 


f iL_Jftfe 'fl f li 


^^^^1 


■ 


- 1 am convinced 


% ^^ffj i| 1 3 


-To k:now even one life ^^^^| 


■ 


tliatlifeislO% 


M ^m Oy ^^ i m 


has breathed easier |^^^H 


■ 


what tiappens to 


Jm ,^B ifilL^ 1 mt 


because you have ^^^^| 




me 


^ggHf I^H HHF^ PiisiJ 


lived, This is to have ^^^^| 


1 


and 90% how 


nRB ^^m G^k 


succeeded. ^^^^| 


■ 


I react to 


[M^y 3R V|HK 




I 


it. 


^^^B 4^H ^H 1 ^^b|^ ^^1 •»"Si«^ffi 


-Ralph Waldo ^^H 
Emerson ^^^^H 




- Charles Swindoll 


flP I^HB ^I^V'^HI 






God saw you getting tired 

and a cure was not to be, 

so he put his arms around you 

and whispered "come to me. " 

A golden heart stopped beating, 

hard working hands at rest ; 

God broke our hearts 

to prove to us 
He only takes the best. 




...and until we meet again may God hold you in the palm of 

His Hand. " 
With Love, From, All Your Friends 




Class of 1995 441 



Seniors, what is your best memory at Boston College ? 



\tW 



i«ve 



vje< 



eVe^ 









# 






tvo 



"Wednesday nights at Manresa House " 
Shelley Johannesen 



S}y^^ 



.cotv' 



ds^«^" 



^uttvW^'' . 



"Kicking Notre Dames'Ass - TWICE." 
Cristiana Santo Pietro 



XtXvV^^TJcoVW^^ 






lie 






"Staying in 
BiU Byrne 



bed 



„„,,U in the afternoon. 



i"'^-'- 



'Jf 



oA 



'%. 



o/? 



"Molly's!" 
Karla Rogers 



'(, 



Op 






^e. 



stt, 



"^yh 



^§ 






"Being caught with our pants down at the U2 

St. Patrick's Day concert." 

La.e„„„.„„ ,.,.toJ^^„... 



toe^^^'Ive^ 



ju\^^ 



^s« 



"Gordon's Kick!" 
Timothy Watson 




iT,r"'"'-f«ndc„,, 



42A 



'"^^odGoifi994.. 






ers after the 






"The Boston area." 
Heather Young 



■V, 



"<%., 



-.werVvouse, 
^ «;oEastpo^\; P„^w\ans 






Cbris 



Seniors 442 



Seniors, what is your worst fear after graduation? 



vove 






TW^V^'' 



•evvts 



"That I'm going to waitress 
for the rest of my life." 
Patty Napoli 



"Singles bars." 
Colleen McNamara 













"Failure." 
Danielle Otto 






* 



"What do you mean graduate, 
I just got mail that said I 
wasn't graduating." 



%> 



'•"•«. 



[ just g»i ...a.. i..ai 

wasn't graduating. 
Chris Georgules 






v^^ 



,^W 



^%^ 



,i^^ 



A^' 



•^ 1 "Responsibility." 
Bryan McLaughlin 



"^ot bein 
^"o^s J,^ """^^ to HnH 



o^ 






^oW»^- 



\o»^^- 









"Coming back to BC in a couple 

of years to find the Dustbowl under reconstruction. 

Alison Andres 









"The real world doesn't tailgate " 

Michael Rozman .^v, oi 



san\tavV_„ 






tsrs-' 



"Ten years down the road, when people 
ask me what I'm doing and I say - I'm 
planning on taking the year off AGAIN . 
Maybe go down to the Vineyard and 
see what happens." 
Jason Ketchen 

Class of 1995 443 




444 Seniors 




Class of 1995 445 














^ 


'■RK'-lltin 




B 


<^ 






"Irish 


1 : 


1 



446 Seniors 





Class of 1995 447 



Congratulations and Good Luck Class of 1995 




448 Seniors 




Class of 1995 449 



BENEFACTORS 



iRatJ d2 J ai sJiIuarez 

jKr. £ jKrs. Cjons/anh'no ^rainion 

9Kr. £ JKrs. ^o/in 9. JSaM 

JlCr. £JItr3. JKario O^oSeri CBafJini 

OrnesiU. Jjariol 

9eorqe £ Jeresa Jjeneoeiio 

jlCr. £ jKrs. Q^iavros CBereiis 

9Kr. £ JKrs. C^ffreJW. CBertofme 

jKaqqie £ ^ranA JSiscealia 

^Icfo £ ^neiia JJioiiz 
JKr. £ JKrs. 'l)ennis Jjowen 

JKrs. JKary Jjowier 

Uom £ loee Jjreen^Gassiat/ 

J)r. £ JKrs. (SJilham ID. Jjresonis 

JKr. £ JKrs. Gampoeli 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jjarrt/ j. Kjarroll 

JKr. £ JKrs. Unomas Gneilen 

Gnenq-J~fsiunq Gniou 

JKiAe £ Cjuy Gnipman 

JAo/nas Jienru GnmieJeaisAi 

Gnarles £ Donna Gnrisiiansen 

yiaisu Giauarelli 

JKr. £ JKrs. ylninona J^. Gincoiia 

JKicnael Girasella 

Giemenhj James £ Ja/nny 

loee Jv. £ Suzanne J. Gole 

JS9 £ JKrs. Joseph J. Gonfon III 

USarry £ Jinn Gonnell 

JKr. £ JKrs. JKicnael J. Gonway 

J^.9. Gosia 

Jjarry £ (unaron Gouinaion 

1450 Gold Benefactors 



ls)i{[iam G. £ Joan lo). Gurran 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jeffrey J. Gzar 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jranco D^^qosiino 

JKr. £ JKrs. J eier J Dauey 

Gmmanuel £ (jrelia Dauia 

Dimiiri J. J)elqacfo 

Dr. £ JKrs. JKicnael Jv. Delia Jvosa 

JKr. £ JKrs. Wiffmm ^. De/oorie 

J aul £ 9erri Deraqon 
JKr. £ JKrs. 9eorae J. Doenner 

Dr. £ JKrs. ^oJin D. Doerr 

JKr. £ JKrs. James G. Donnelly 

JKr. £ JKrs. JKiquel ^. Duenas 

JKel £ Gone Duffey 

JKr. £ JKrs. Wi/fmm Jf. C/Ls 

JKicnael £ Gainerine ^Ji. Onnis 

JKr. £ JKrs. JKarA Gnsio 

JKr. £ JKrs. Josepn JS. Grwin 

JKr. £ JKrs. Ooivara J. Osposi/o 

Dr. £ JKrs. (J. JK. Osposi/o 

^nneiie Jarnan 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jucnaro Jiori/o 

Daniel £ J3ein Jiizqeralo 

/oincfa '•lizzo Jizzinoqlia 

JKr £ JKrs. Uinceni J. Jlanerity 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jhawrence J: J'leminq 

JKaureen £ Dauio Jrancescani 

Olisa 9aoelli Jamily 

JKr. £ JKrs. JoJin 9a^fiarc/i 

JKr. £ JKrs. 9enorano 

JKr. £ JKrs. 9^. 9£ifoni 

Dr. £ JKrs. J^au[9. 9ocffrey 



JKr. £ Jlirs. Sector ^oiricelaua 

JlCr. £ JKrs. Cnifen ^ 9o[cf 

JKr. £ JKrs. G/irisiop£er Is). ^oufcf 

JKaureen £ T)ic£(C8G '69 J 9raff 

JKr. £ Jltrs. C^icAarJJ. 9riffin 

JKr. £ JKrs. 9eoffreu 9riffit£s 

Dr. £ JKrs. CjarJos 9uerra 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^osepJi QurJa 

J^oSeri J^t^an Jfannan, J^£S '60 

j^ac£ £ J^e^^u Jfart 

U^onalcf Jfea^le 

JKr. £ JKrs. Sarry Jfeiiz 

Uvicnara £ Jielen JlicAet/ 

Jim £ 9an J~fuqnes 

J\au2noncf £ Jtatnleen Jiuer 

^'onn £ Deanna JjunansAu 

JKr. £ JKrs. JKicfiael Jsfiif 

^ouce &. jarosz - J^om, J^n. 7). 

J^eaau £ J'oe j^enninys 

JKr. £ JKrs. Unomas Ji. jonnsion 

JKaru £ (b/epnen jones 

-Dr. £ JKrs. Samuel y^uliao 

Douqfas c5. Jieiin (L)r. 

^min J. -Jinounj 

JKr. £ JKrs. Wifimm 9. JCoAfman 

^rinur £ Ua/'a Jtoumanizelis £ J'amiliJ 

Jiaqop £ yea Jioui/oumajian 

jucfit/i JS. £ J?onafJ S. JCrauss 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^. ^osep/ijBaffy 

JSiff £ Dede Sane 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^'ranA Joanzarone 

Uincenzo Cj. lOaracca - Jiurea loaracca 

JKr. £ JKrs. J'vooeri J. /oauinia 

JKrs. Olaine iDe Gomie 



Jnnqie £ JKanuel loedesma 

Jvooeri £ j^ane /oeroux 

J'. Douqlass £ Jtatnleen Ji. lOowreu 

JOennu J~i. Jou £ 9ina G. /ou 

JKrs. lot/nn iDuoerqer 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jjrian JKaaiqan 

OCeyf£ Synn JKa£er ('Jl£S 1 969 J 

Jim £ J eqqij JKanonet/ 

Dr. £ JKrs. Jvooert JKalonec/ 

Jvicnara £ J atricia JKanzi 

JKr. £ JKrs. CdffreJ^. JKarc£it{o 

9aru £ janei JKarcus 

Uicioria JKariin 

JKr. £ JKrs. J^onafcf G. JKcGar/ny 

JKr. £ JKrs. Wi/fiam 9: JKcGar/y 

JKr. £ JKrs. Gnarfes JC. JKcDermoii 

JKr. £ JKrs. Unomas J. JKc9uire 

JKr. £ JKrs. C-icfwarcf JKcJiqhe 

JKrs. Gainerine Jleane JKemory 

JKr. £ JKrs. Bouis J^. JKetifer 

JKr. £ JKrs. 'William 91. JKiffer 

Drs. Jjrij JK. £ (buman JKisnra 

SJierrij £ C^r^ (9[£S '66/ JKissan 

Uicioria £ J aul JKorris 

J^riqi/ie £ 9erarcf JKoufflet 

^onn £ JKarie JKulIarJieij 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jnomas J. JKulliaan 

JKr. £ JKrs. Unomas U. JKuIIiqan 

Gnar/ie £ Ulniia JKurpna 

Jyooeri £ Denise jCajarian £ Uamila 

Dr. £ JKrs. J\ene jCasser 

Uom O'Jjrien 

Dr. £ JKrs. J^airicf,^. O'Dea 

^oan £ ^o£n O'Jfeefe 

Gold Benefactors 



451 



^im (£ j^eanne U^/oeary 

Sanne £ ^oe OaAes (iParenis ofXrish'n ^95 J 

^JiimoeritJ C (Jens 

Ovooeri £ ^nce OoacnowsA/ 

Cjarl £ yoAo UAawa 

CRofanJT). £OC//yV. Oris 

JKr. £ JlCrs. Cjcfmuna J. Orszula 

^o£n £ JlCarzta J^armemore 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^ayJeu "Paief 

iPeier £ ^ail J mnianiaa 

Une J lurao Jamila 

JKr. £ JKrs. Barnes V. CPoIiian 

IKr. £ JKrs. CRonafJCn. CPorier 

iJrs. Uvose £ josepn J oHanai 

9Kr. £ 9Krs. Dale 9. "Poiier 

JKr. £ JK^rs. Picnarcf P. Prior 

^effreu /3. £ Seiiiia Puff or J 

'Dr. jose £ Dr. jKaria iRaffinan., ML. D. 

Picnarcf Pf. Jveisner 

Dr. £ Mirs. Penj'amin U. Picnaras 

Palricia lo. Pooinson 

jlir. £ jKrs. Pooeri Possi 

Dr. £ MLrs. Dennis P. Possi 

Jlir. £ JKrs. Unomas Poin 

pm £ Diane Puan 

Dr. £ JiLrs. jCicnofas P. (balerno., PC. D. 

<L)an/o Dominao tjnaineerina 

j^onn £ Cillen C>ayers 

Mir. £ ylCrs. 3ievin JlL. <ucanIon 

Paul £ 9race (bcnuuz 

^im £ D ^Prcu ^ecorcf 

jKr. £ Mirs. Pn/nonty ^. (berra (br. 



Mir. £ JKrs. Pn/on o^e/iawan 
Oowara £ Olizaoein 'bnimamoio 

JKr. £ JKrs. JSernara ^miin 

JKr. £ JKrs. PranA tj. <Opauiaina 

'bianletJ £ PeuerltJ <bpear 

JKr. £ JKrs. Pr/Aur P. Swip 

DicA £ jane ^wifi 

joe yCennein Pnai 

Perrence £ DeooraJi uJiom 

JJoo £ jane Pnomaier 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^ieuen Cjnapman Unomas 

JKr. £ JKrs. Jvalpn Uieri 

Cjesar £ Jjea/riz Uinio 

Dr. £ JKrs. Pninonu JK. Uonzala 

JKonica £ PrecfUoHola 

Jyooeri £ vjarol PrainueA 

JKr. £ JKrs. Pooerl Urimole 

9aii <L)noa>oen £ Jvoscoe Primmier^ jr. 

JKinou P. Puazon 

Dr £ JKrs. JKicAaef^. VelsmiJ 

Po6er/0^. Vo^i 

JKr. £ JKrs. GAar/es JC. Von Der PlJie 

Cjorl £ JKaryann (OJa/son 

OCeil £ Jeanne JoJeinaar/en 

JKarh'n £ Pnne Wefcn 

JKr. £ JKrs. Omerson JK. (SJicAwire 

Dr. £ JKrs. Pnomas P. ISJilson 

jKr. £ JKrs. you-^bJianyan^ 

JKr £ JKrs. Pic£arJJK. youny 

Jason juamouto 

Pmelia UaJia juannini 

J\aul /jolezzi 



1452 Gold Benefactors 




BENEFACTORS 



Mr. & Mrs. MichaelJ. Amoroso, Jk 

William D. Auger 

Mr. & Mrs. Amame L. Badua 

Dr & Mrs. Albert J. Bajohr, Jr 

Mr & Mrs. Alfred N. Basilicato 

Dr & Mrs. William M. Battle 

Drs. Clifton & Phoebe Bertrand 

Mr & Mrs. Hemendra R. Bhatt 

Mr & Mrs. C.V. Blake 

Mr & Mrs. James Boris 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome C. Buckley 

Allan A. & Mary Buote 

Joe & Pam Burke 

John M. & Maureen Burke 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Burns 

Mr & Mrs. John D. Butters, Sr 

Mr & Mrs. Michael Byrne 

John & Mollie Callagy 

David & Martha Campbell 

Mr & Mrs. J. W. Casey & Family 

Mr & Mrs. Richard Cenedella 

Mr & Mrs. Eugene R. Chretien 

Mr & Mrs. Richard Christensen 

Mr & Mrs. John V. Clifford 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Cloutier 

Mr & Mrs. Harry Clune 

Mr & Mrs. C. Richard Coffey 

Mr & Mrs. Daniel W. Coley 

Philip G. Collins 

Jim & Karen Cooper 

Harry & Doris Costello 

Mr & Mrs. James Crincoli 

Dr Kevin & Jeanne Cunningham 

Dick & Ann Curran 

Vincent & Marie D'Angelo 

Joanne & Paul Daniels 

Mr & Mrs. James P. Day 

Mr & Mrs. Joseph M. Days ' 70 

Joseph E. Debernardis 

Charles & Karen DeFazio 

Steve Nicolaides & Toni Devereaux 

Frank & Julia DiMaio 

Robert & Patricia Dinwoodie 

John & Beverly Donohue 



Steve & Carolynne Dragos 

Cynthia & Norman Duffy 

Bridget & Jim Fanning 

Dr. & Mrs. Carlos Fermo 

Jay & Susan Finkle 

Mr & Mrs. Derek J. Fitzgerald 

Patrick & Maureen Flahaven 

Matthew & Judith Forrest 

Alice & Frank Gatti 

Richard & Laura George & Family 

Peter & Helen Gerken 

Anne Gibson 

The Giuriceo Family 

Mr & Mrs. Thomas D. Godino 

Charles & Sallyanne Goodale 

George & Regina Gorski 

Mr & Mrs. Irving J. Goss 

Robert & Ann Grande 

Mr & Mrs. Anthony V. Graziano 

Georgette & Varikes Haladjian 

Thomas & Susan Harman 

Mr & Mrs. Dan Hartnett 

Jeanne & Paul Henderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Herson 

Mr & Mrs. George Hinchcliff 

Sharon & David Hoffman 

Atty & Mrs. W.N. Hurley 

Patricia & Christian Jacobsen 

Mr & Mrs. Lowell E. Jaeger 

Patricia F. Jordan 

William J. Keane 

Johann & Catherine Keil 

Mr & Mrs. K. Thomas Kemp 

Robert & Janice Ketchen 

Mr & Mrs. Paul B. Kilmer 

Woo Hung & Jong Hee Kim 

Tae H. Kim 

Mr & Mrs. Jim King 

David W. Krueger, MD 

Dr & Mrs. Peter C. Kullman 

Robert A. & Ramona F. Lakkis 

Dr & Mrs. Charles J. Lancelotta 

Martin & Ann Lawlor 

Dr. & Mrs. Laurance C. Lee 



Silver Benefactors 453l 



Stephanie & Dean LeGras 

Barbara & John Lent 

Paul R. Lesutis 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Levenson 

Mr & Mrs. Sam Longo 

Paul & Jessica Match 

Dr. & Mrs. Louis Marchioli 

Dewayn & Jean Marzagalli 

Mr & Mrs. Joseph V. Marzetti 

Mr & Mrs. Giovanni Mauri 

Mr & Mrs. James P. McAvey 

Mr & Mrs. John W. McCabe 

Kenneth & Donyce McCluskey 

Mrs. Eve McGrath 

Edward & Anne Marie McLaughlin 

Stephen & Patricia McLaughlin 

Wayne & Marilyn McPhee 

Mr & Mrs. Michael A. Mingolelli 

Mr & Mrs. Moorehead 

Marge & Vinnie Moreno 

Mr & Mrs. Martin M. Mortimer 

Jules & Gisela Musing-Portael 

Dr & Mrs. Henry Nasrallah 

Mr & Mrs. Eric H. Nicker son 

Virginia Norato 

Tom & Carol Norcross 

James J. O'Brien 

Robert & Barbara O'Donnell 

John W. & Margaret F. O'Keefe 

Richard Oddo & Lucille Oddo 

Anne & Ed Ostrowski 

Mr & Mrs. Edward Paduck 

Mr & Mrs. Don Paglieri 

Mr & Mrs. Joseph K. Paul 

Mr & Mrs. Mitchell Pearlman 

Mr & Mrs. John M. Perrone 

Richard & Suzanne Peters 

George & Marti Piccirilli 

Anne & Pete Pietropaolo 

Mr & Mrs. Nicholas Policy 

Barry & Susan Porter 

Steven & Joan Previte 

Mr. & Mrs. Carroll F. Promades 

Paul Ptashnick 

Mr & Mrs. Edward P. Quinn 



Alberto & Florencia Ramirez 

Emmanuel & Priscilla Riego De Dios 

Jim & Kathy Robertson 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Roenitz 

Mr & Mrs. Ralph Rogers 

Chuck Rozycki 

Martin & Diane Sammarco 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerard J. Schilling 

Dr. & Mrs. David E. Schuller 

Bob & Paige Schweizer 

Dr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Scully 

Mr & Mrs. Vincent J. Shanley '72 

Carol & Tim Shanley 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Shannon 

Mr & Mrs. Gerald C. Shea 

Mr & Mrs. James M. Sheahan 

Richard & Evelyn Slusky 
Mr & Mrs. Patsy L. Sposato 

Robert & Marie Stahmer 

Steinkamp-dePlazaola Family 

Joseph C. Steinkrauss, Esq. B.C. I960, 

Donna Mason Steinkrauss B.C. 1960 

Ned & Lorraine Stewart 

Richard A. & Joanna A. Stillwagon 

Maureen Szal 

Donald & Helene Taylor 

Edwin R. Terry 

John & Ann Thibeault 

Margaret & Bob Thomas 

Wallace & Helena Thurlow 

Jane & Terry Toal 

Frank & Lorraine Trifiletti 

Mr. & Mrs. Gabriele J. Troiano 

Steven & Vivian Valenty 

Marie & David Valeri 

Mr & Mrs. Vella 

Mr & Mrs. Frank T Volpe 

Mrs. Deborah R. West 

Mr & Mrs. Michael D. White 

Mr & Mrs. Robert A. Winson 

Prof. & Mrs. August Witt 

Marianne W. & Stephen D. Young 

Dr. & Mrs. A. Zacharias & Family 

Nickolas & Anna Zaderej 

Mr & Mrs. Anthony J. Zarillo, Sr 

Barry & Meryl Zuckerberg 



|454 Silver Benefactors 



Richard & Jean Abrams 

John & Shireen Aforismo 

Dr. & Mrs. M. Ebadat AU 

Mario Alonso's Parents 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Ambrose 

Maura & Sean Amery & Family 

The Amore Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Amorosa 

Sandra & Paul Angeli 

Carole & Francis Angelino 

Mr. & Mrs. David Aquino 

Dolores Arciero 

Mary L. Armstrong 

Mr. & Mrs. Gabriel Armstrong 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Armstrong 

Ben & Mary Aroy 

Mr. & Mrs. F. G. Aruca 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. V. Ashton 

Stephen D. Barbaro 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Barbieri 

Camil & Aurora Barcenas 

Andrew & Deana Bama 

Mr. & Mrs. L.K. Bamett 

Mrs. Sheila D. Bamhart 

Mr. & Mrs. Denis W. Barron 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert F. Bayers, Jr. 

Lou & Ginny Benzak 

Mr. & Mrs. John Bergin 

Patrick & June Bessette 

Manuel J. Bettencourt, Jr. 

Mary Jane Bikowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Bilek 

Dr. & Mrs. W. Stewart Blackwood 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank W. Bode 

T.M. Bogo 

Eileen & James Bohan 

Ron & Karen Bomberger 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee A. Bordick 

DeAnna M. Boutilier 

Stephen & Roberta Brady 

Debby & Marshall Brass 

Jim, Maureen & Kim Brennan '97 

Constance & Bruce Brereton 

Art & Patti Bresnahan 

Steve & Sheila Brizca 

Madeline Brown 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Burke Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William Burke 



Mr. & Mrs. George T. Bumham 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward M. Bums 

Robert & Linda Bykowski 

William J. Byrne, Jr. 

Frank & Joan Campbell 

Lou & Karen Cannati 

Mary & Anthony Cannella 

Mr. & Mrs. Bill Carew 

Marie & Anthony Carrino 

Bill & Kristy Cassels 

Elizabeth Cerkanowicz 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Ceruzzi 

Jose F. Chaves 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Chidiac 

Mr. & Mrs. Bhupen Chowhan 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Christen 

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Christianson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Ciampi 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Cianci 

Robert & Margaret Clark 

Eleanor & Norman Clausen 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael T. Clifford 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund J. Cole 

John & JoAnn Congdon 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome P. Connolly 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Cooney 

Mr. & Mrs. Ivan Corwin 

Jean Cosentino 

Ms. Daisy M. Coss 

Michael & Patricia Cox 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Crowley 

Marilyn Ann CuUinane 

Brian P. & Roberta A. Cummings 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Basil Cunningham 

Vincent & Mary D'Amico 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. DaPerro 

Kirtland A. & Barbara M. Decherd 

Bob & Emily DeSantis 

Mr. & Mrs. Concezio Di Gregorio 

Mr. & Mrs. Mathew Divjak 

Richard Steven Dobkin 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Donley 

Robert Douglas III 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Drane 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Peter Driscoll 

John & Susan Droskoski 

Patrick & B rigid Duffy 

Timothy & Laureen Duffy 



Richard & Rosemarie Dujardin 

Mr. & Mrs. William Eamst 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Egan, III 

Mr. & Mrs. James K. Egan 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Eldredge 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Elenbaas 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Enis 

Carol & Bill Evans 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Faccone 

Lenore C. Farrell 
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Federico 

Felago Family 

Attorney & Mrs. John J. Ferry 

Ann Riley Finck '66 

Mary T. Fiorelli 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Fitzpatrick, Jr. 

Dick & Nancy Flanigan 

John & Eileen Fleck 

John & Marilyn Fleming 

Lynne P. Foerster 

Robert & Susan Foye 

Mr. & Mrs. T.S. Franke 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony L. Gabriele 

Jack & Kathleen Gagne 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Gallagher 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Gallagher 

Joseph & Susan Gama 

Mr. & Mrs. Manuel Garcia 

Jose Luis Garcia 
Mr. & Mrs. John S. Gardiner 

Marie & Henry Garon 
Dr. & Mrs. Ralph Gattozzi 

Bernie & Pat Gatzen 

Christine & Terrence Gavan 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard & Carol Geden 

Wende & Pat Gennardo 

Peter & Peg Geraffo 

Dr. & Mrs. Barry F. Gibbons 

Mr. & Mrs. John Giglia 

Barbara & John Gimperling 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Giordano 

John & Laurie Goodsell 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Gorman 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur F. Grant 

Ruth Graves 

Jim & Roberta Griffin 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Grzymkowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Dean Guidi 



Patrons 455 



Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Guilmette 

Judy & Bill Gustin 

The Gustin Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilham S. Haberlin 

Dimitra Habib 

Ron & Beth Hadley 

Marilyn & Donald Haggerty 

Janet Gibbons Hannon 

Elias & Georgette Hannoush 

Paul & Marilyn Hardiman 

Ms. Nancy Barry Harkey 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Thomas Harrick 

Donald & Karen Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. Milton R. Hathaway 

Max Hatziiliades 

Mr. & Mrs. Gene Heaney 

Neil & Mary Lou Hegarty 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Herbstzuber 

Harold & Juana Hidalgo 

Bob & Joan Higgins 

Jim & Lynn Higgins 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Hofman 

Ronald & Althea Howland 

Richard & Mary Huber 

Jack & Judi Hudson 

The lacono Family 

Pat & Don Ingoglia 

Mr. & Mrs. Franklin Iris 

Mr. & Mrs. Mario ludiciani 

Kathleen E. Jamaitis 

James & Louise Januzzi 

Pamela Jerskey & Ronald Williams 

Steve & Kathy Johannesen 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Johnson 

Glen & Barbara Jorgensen 

Allen F. Kalar 

Renie & Ed Karazin 

Sandra Kaufmann 

Richard & Pamela Kehoe 

Daniel & Linda Kelley 

Lorel & Bob Kelly 

Joe & Connie Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard F. Kelly 

Michael & Joan Kelly 

Dr. & Mrs. John P. Kelly 

Tom & Bonnie Kenny 

Ralph & Janet Kirk 

Theodore & Mary Kay Klein 

Leonard & Christa Klein 

Jim & Diane Konen 

Diane & Bill Korn 



Ronald & Lois Krantz 

Mr. & Mrs. Hans H. Krause 

Mr. & Mrs. Kevin S. Kuntz 

Nicholas & Mary Ann Lambros 

Edward & Patricia Langan 

Mr. & Mrs. Glendall C. Larkin, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Latacz 

Gregory & Nancy Lau 
Mr. & Mrs. Yau Leung Lau 

Frank & Diane Lavelle 

Doo Lim & Myung Ok Lee 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert F. Lefebvre 

Mrs. Hilkka M. Leone 

Bob & Alice Le Valley 

Roland & Teddy Leveille 

Mary & Fred Lewchik 

Steve & Lonna Liccini 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Liegel 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Lilly 

Roy S. & Kathleen E. Lindstrom 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Linnan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Linnehan 

Stanley & Adeline Livingston 

Janet M. Loach 

Mr. & Mrs. R. M. Lockerd 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary N. Long 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland L. Loper 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Lutz II 

Jeb & Kathy Lynch 

Dr. & Mrs. Luis C. Maas 

Philip & Anita Mabardy 

William & Georgiana Macey 

Rick & Maureen Madden 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Magnotta 

Mr. & Mrs. William Maloney 

Mr. & Mrs. P. Manevso 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Manganelli 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Mangiaracina 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin L. Marietta 

Pat & Janice Mariniello 
Edward & Donna Markofsky 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Marmen 

Tom & Dianne Maroney 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Martone 

Ron & Charlotte Martyn 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Mastroianni 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary E. Matviak 

Ron & Connie Maxson 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerald McAuliffe 

Ellen & Frank McBrearity 

Joan & Steve McCann 



Charles & Dorothy McCarthy 

James & Louise McCarthy 

Bill & Serena McClane 

Robert & Joanne McCormack 

William & Ellen McDonough 

Marjorie Schenk McDuffie 

Steve & Mary Jane McEachron 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. McFarland 

Mr. & Mrs. James McGee 

Hugh & Geri McGlone 

Mrs. Denise L. McKee 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. McMahon 

Meg McSorley 

Drs. Gary B. & Catherine M. McVicke 

Gerald E. Meacham 

D. J. Mehan 

Robert & Peggy Mehr 

Dr. Sergio Mejia 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul J. Merges 

John & Denise Metz 

Michael & Christina Meyer 

Inez M. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Mirisola 

Peter & Jeanne Mitchell 

James & Mary Ann Monge 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Michael Mooney 

Joseph & Stephanie Moran 

Jim & Kathy Moran 

Robert & Susan Morgan 

Jane & Bernard Morgan 

John & Kathleen Moriarty 

Dorothy & Peter Morris 

Robert & Ann Mueller 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Mulczhy 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene M. Mullen 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Murray 

Martha & Dan Murray 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Mustillo, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Aram & Patricia Najarian 

Mr. & Mrs. Y. Nazarian 

Craig & Barbara Nelson 

John & Karen Nestor 

Nes's Folks 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank P. Nocella 

Peter & Gail Noon 

Mr. & Mrs. Angle & David Noonan 

Mr. & Mrs. Denis A. O'Connell 

James J. & Patricia A. O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward H. O'Donoghue, J 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. O'Keefe 



1456 Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. William O'Neil 

Pat & Bob O'Reilly 

Mr. & Mrs. Mortimer O'Shea 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. O' Sullivan 

Kay Oldenhoff 

Ralph & Norma Orefice 

Barbara & Mark Overland 

Mr. & Mrs. Rogelio M. Palaganas 

Judith L. Pavano 

Mr. & Mrs. Russell L. Peach & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Peck 

Mr. & Mrs. Francesco Pecoraro 

Leigh R. Peet 

Lawrence & Nancy Peters 

Mr. & Mrs. James Phelan 

Geraldine Pierson 

Larry & Jean Pietrasiewicz 

Mr. & Mrs. Jose Pimentel 

Russel J. & Patricia B. Pinho 

Pip & Joe Porter 

Mr. & Mrs. Terry W. Powley 

Dick & Vicki Premerlani 

Charles & Mary Presto 

Lila & Andrzej Pron'czuk 

Jan & Virginia Quackenbush 

Molly & David Quackenbush 

Mary Radocchio 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond R. Rafferty, Jr. 

Marcel & Janet Rajotte 

Nancy & Dennis Rapaszky 

James N. Rath 

Dr. & Mrs. Frederick Rawe 

Eileen Razzetti 

Carol L. Reil 

Mr. & Mrs. Barrie Richardson 

Marc Charles Rinaldi 

Mary & Mike Riordan 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Rizzo 

Jorge & Gloria Rodriguez 

Clara & Richard Rogers 



Janet & Ronald Romanowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Rose 

Marie Therese Rosier 

Mr & Mrs. Marvin Rozman 

Donna & Tony Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip W. Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Salemi 

Jerry & Hillian Sam 

Michael S. Sample 

Wm. R. & Sharon E. Sampson 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Sandow 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Santangelo 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis N. Scanga 

Allen H. Schiefelbein 

The Schullers 

Kevin A. Kathleen Scollans 

Joe & Betsy Sgroi 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Shibles 

Michael J. & Patricia A. Shire 

Mr. & Mrs. David Shunk 

Andre & Veronica Simonpietri 

Attorney & Mrs. Dean R. Singewald 

Sterling S. Smith, Kathleen M. Smith 

Frank & Joan Solis 

The Sorokolit Family: Nicole '94; 

Amy '98; Beth '98 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Spergl 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Starke 

Florian & Karen Steffen 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Stone 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Strunk 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip H. Sullivan 

Tim & Susan Sullivan 

Dr. & Mrs. Philip W. Susann 

Mr. & Mrs. G. A. Sutherland II 

Ernest W. Swanson 

W. Richard Sylvanovich 

Mr. & Mrs. John Tamanakis & Family 

Roberta & Jack Taylor 

Mary & Dennis Taylor 



J. David & Kathy Tholen 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Michael Tholl 

Mr. & Mrs. James N. Thompson 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Toohey 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Turcotte 

David & Veronica Twomey 

Mr. «fe Mrs. James Tynan 

Susan & William Tyndale 

Peter & Gael Ulisse 

Joe & Joyce Ursino 

Dr. Samuel & Anne Uva 

Dr. & Mrs. Eugene J. Valentini 

Graciano & Olivia Varao 

Mr. & Mrs. Sime Vidaic 

Camille & Franco Vitiello 

Frank & Carmella Vitolo 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Vonderhorst 

Alexandra Voutiritsas 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Waanenen 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Jeffrey Walker 

Carole A. Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. William T. Ward 

Dr. & Mrs. Lewis E. Watson 

Harvey & Margaret Waugh 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul A. Weber 

Mr. & Mrs. William Webster 

Mr. & Mrs. Michal R. Weir 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Weiss 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. Welch 

Glyn R. & Stephanie Wellum 

Harold David Werntz 

Helene Wheeler & David Steinberg 

Cherie K. Whitmore & Robert Foster 

Phillip & Roberta Williams 

Mr. & Mrs. George E. Wilson, Jr. 

The Wyndham Family 

Joseph & Lorena Yalmokas 

John & Irene Yao 

Robert A. & Rosemary Young 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Zeinoun 



The Staff of Sub Turri, The Yearbook of Boston College, would 

like to extend its thanks, gratitude, and appreciation to the 

parents, families, friends, faculty members, and alumni who 

contributed to the 1 995 Sub Turri. Your donations as 

Benefactors and Patrons have helped to make the production of 

this book possible. 



II 



Thank you. 



Patrons 4571 



JOSTENS, Inc 








Would like to congratulate Sub TurrVs 
graduating Seniors: 



Steve Antonik 

Julie Ashley 

Kristen D^Amato 

Erika Dimmler 

Kerrie Doerr 

Nora Francescani 

Kenneth Freda 

Alls a Gatti 

Julie Griffiths 

Tracy Hofmann 

Mark Khorsandi 

Ajay Kuntamukkala 

Dan Levasseur 

Alison Logrip 

Peter Manis 

Becky 



Sean McCarthy 

Barbara McGuiness 

Gautam Mishra 

Stan Orszula 

Mona Patel 

Joe Plurad 

Debbie Ralston 

Jay Reblando 

Tom Rudegeair 

Susan Spear 

Dave Shapiro 

Cheryl Swanson 

Nicole Tillyer 

Ann Toohey 

Tim Watson 

Yang 




458 Advertisers 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to the 

Boston College 

Class of 1995. 



CARL WOLF STUDIO, Inc. 

OFFICIAL YEAJRJBOOK PHOTOGRAPHERS 

40 1 Elmwood Avenue 

Elmwood Court One 

Sharon Hill, PA 19079 

1-800-969-1338 



Advertisers 459 







M> 




WJ- ■■■■.' 






'i:::k 




Boston College 
Dining Services 

would like 

to congratulate 

the class of 1995 

and 

extend its 

sincere thanks 

to all of the 

student employees 

who have worked for 

Dining Services 

during the last 

four years. 




:^^ 



■;:i/. 









460 Advertisers 



Congratulations on your 
achievement 




Ba/Bank^ 



Member FDIC 



Full Seri/lee 

Top Qualify 

& Quick Tuftiaround 

We Guarantee All Three 



b.c. press 

b-59 higgins hall 

boston college 

chestnut hill, ma 02167 

552 - 3418 & 9 (fax) 552 - 3319 

boston college 's on-catnpus one-stop printshop 



business cominunication center 

lower lobby, prudential tOTver 

boston, ma 02199 

(617) 262 - 3920 (fax) 262 - 6442 

your one-stop printing & copying service 

Typesefting 

Desktop Publishing 

Photocopying 

Offset Printing 



Full In-House Bindery 
Bulk Mailing Services 
Laminating 
i Much More 



Advertisers 461 



THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY HOUSING 

thanks and congratulates all members of the 
Resident Staff, especially those in the 

Class of 1995. 

Your service, dedication, and loyalty to Boston 

College sets new standards of excellence. 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 
Residential Life 

Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 
Operations I Financial Management 

Robert F. Capalbo, Ph.D. 

Director of University Housing 




Congratulations to the Class of 1995! 

from 

THE BOSTON COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Keep us up to date on your address so we can keep 
you in touch with your friends and classmates. 

825 CENTRE STREET 

NEWTON, MA 02158 

(617) 552-4700 or (800) 669-8430 



462 Advertisers 



Congratulations to 

the 

Class of 1995! 

Wishing a lifetime of 
health and prosperity 
from your friends at 




I960 Beacon Street 
Brookline, NA 02146 

Tel. (617) 566-1002 
FAX (617) 566-4846 



The Perfect Location for any Occasion! 



Deluxe accommodations 
J. Witherspoon's Grill & Pub 
Fitness Center with Indoor Pool and Sauna 
;, Meeting rooms accommodating 10 to 200 guests 
Big screen TV. action in the Pub 
Express bus to downtown Boston & 
Logan Airport 
Free overnight parking 
Adjacent to restaurants and shops 



Sheraton ®)Tara Hotel 



THE FLATLEY COMPANY 

320 Washington Street, Newton MA 02158 
617-969-3010 



BEST OF LUCK B.C. GRADUATES! 



8 



AREER 
ENTER 



OF BOSTON COLLEGE 

\ > 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1995 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

• Career Information Netw^ork 

• Current Job Listings 

• Career Resource Library 

• Job Search Workshops/Career Programs 

• Individual Appointments 

• Evening Hours on Mondays 
during the academic year 



Congratulations to the class of 1995 

from 

An Eagle's View of Boston College 

and... Beyond: 

A Student's Guide. 



» 



Press 

rtttt 



Congratulations 

and 

Good Luck 

to the 

Class of 1995! 

From the Business Staff of 

SUB TURRI 

THE YEARBOOK OF BOSTON COLLEGE 



Advertisers 463 




The 1995 Sub Turri Staff would like to 
thank all those who helped make this book 

possible. 
Special thanks to... 

• Fr. Dennis Yesalonia, S. J., for taking care of all the problems over the summer. The work you put in for us guarante( 
that we would have a book this year. 

• Fr. Joseph O'Keefe, S.J., our Faculty Advisor, for still being our advisor after the seeing what happened before v 
actually started production. Thanks also for your advice and support when we really needed it. 

• Carole Hughes and Ann Morgan, the Deans at ODSD. You guys also deserve credit for taking care of us over tl 
summer, and making sure we could still do the book. Thanks also for answering any remaining questions, and supportir 
us through it all. 

• Jostens, Inc., our publishing company, and the Employees who spent the long hours literally putting this yearboc 
together. 

• Arnie Lohmann, our wonderful Jostens Representative for his enthusiasm, help, support, and favors to make sure th 
we again put out a great book. 



464 Sub Turri Staff 



Kerry Cashion, our Jost^sptlStomer Service Representative in WinstQii-Salem, NC. Your patience in solving our 
roblems and answering our.iihending questions helped us get our pages out a little faster anji more efficiently. 






Rick Brooks, the Jostens (^.reative Resources Consultant. The time and work spent on the cover will not be forgotten. 
our patience with our staw during the brainstomimg session has produced the best covet Sub Turri has seen. Period. 

Joe Durinzi, Sr., Mike Dutiiizi, Valerie,: and Dawn at Carl Wolf Studio; Inc., for all the work they put in to provide 
s with the much needed photographic serv|ees and supplies. Thanks also for shooting the Senior Class on such short 
otice and still manage to dp"^^^#Thanks Dawn, for putting together the almost 2000 portraits and sending them up when 
/e needed them. - - • ' ^^ , 

Larry, Rick, Dan, and Dean,,^theiCarl Wolf Photographers for spending the long hours in our windowless office, 
'hanks also for setting up and bre|iking down every day at Walsh Hall for two weeks iri order t0 shoot most of the Senior 
'lass for us. 

The Heights, especially Dai} Levasseur and the photography staff for the last minute photos and darkroom help. 

The Secretaries and Dean^^ipf all the Univei'sity Offices, Schools, and Departments for putting up with our phone 
alls and responding to us as^'^^n as you, could. "^ 



Dennis and the University Archives for supporting what we do here: record the history of BC. Thanks for the help. 

Parents, Friends, Alumni, Faculty and Staff for their support and cooperation in gettiij^this book produced. 

Take out drivers who todk'the time to^aetually look for McElroy 103. You made sure we survived the long nights in 
le office. ■--■ ■ ' ■: - . 



Tony and the Custodia 

nd trash we produce. 




"or the converation ahd for makirig'^slirt we didtft become, overwhelmed by the paper 



Finally, to the Class of 1995 for their cooperation in getting your portraits done and sending in candids. Thanks for 
our faces, stories, memories, and a wonderful four years. 



. -:*t&aJ2£.i-ii&lvW .■2SS'^ ■ -■'^■;^" 



.># 




Sub Turri Staff 465 



\.»^' 



BUSINESS 



Thanks to Mark, Ajay, and everyone 
else who helped out with the Business 
Section. Congratulations to the whole 
Sub Turri Staff, especially Joe and 
Pete, for producing another excellent 
yearbook. Good luck and thank you 
to all my friends at BC; I will miss you 
all. It has been a great four years. 



-Gautam 



Gautam Mishra 



BUSINESS MANAGER 





Ajay Kuntamukkala 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Mark Khorsandi 

SALES MANAGER 



1466 Business Staff 



STEVE liAUAS 



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BILL THE CAT 






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One of the Three 



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BliXKLEY 






Thy Motely Crue 



<Peter ManiS Editor <> Thomas Rudegeair Associate Editor <> Stephen AntOnik Assistant Editor > 




Elena 
Vizvary 



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Levasseur ^ ^^ > , . ^ 
Not pictured: p, ^"^^'^ Maria Segura 

■ ^ ^^" McCarthy - ^ 






"Insanity in individuals is ' 
rare -but in groups, 
parties, nations, and 
epochs, it is the rule." 
"A politician divides 
mankind into two classes: 
tools and enemies." 

Friedrich Nietzsche 



"The nonsensical ravings, of a lunatic mind..." Gene Wilder 



"Reason respects the 
differences, and 
imagination the 
similitudes of things." 
Percy 3ysshe Shelley 



. J5 



^. 



"To be honest, one "President 

must be inconsistent." I^eagan didn't 

.s., H.G.Wells always know 

.0^^''° W what he knew." 
,^^^^''v^o^^°^ Lt.Col, 

''^V^''^TW^'Vrv>^^ <^i Oliver North 




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^\\^^ / 'The less effort, the faster 
oO' and more powerful you will be." 



Bruce Lee 



<k-^.% 



Q ^ 



'To win one hundred 
victories in one hundred 
battles is not the highest 
skill. To subdue the 
enemy without fighting is 
the highest skill." 

Sun-Tzu 



H 




"Ecrasez I'infame!" 
Voltaire 

"There is nothing enduhnq 
m life for a woman except 
what she builds in a man's 
heart." '^ 

Sally Kempton 



I am a deeply superficial person." Andy Warhol 



1 



COT. 




"Modern art is what 
happens when 
painters stop looking 
at girls and persuade 
themselves they have 
a better idea." 

John Ciardi 



"When other lips and other hearts 

Their tales of woe shall tell, 

In language whose excess imparts 

The power they feel so well. 

There may, perhaps, in such a scene, 

Some recollection be 

Of days that have as happy been. 

And you'll remember me." 

Alfred Bunn 



^i?o 



" Photographers, along with 

dentists, av& the two .^ 

professions n&y&x- ^ 

satisfied with what 

they do. Every ^ 

dentist would 

lil<e to be a 

doctor and 

Inside every 

photographer 

is a painter 

trying to get 

out." 

Pablo Picasso 




"Come on, I've ^ot to shoot a 
track meet at Harvard..." 

Stephen Antonik, 
Spring 1994 




3loom County Junky 



Then there was only blackness... Many thanks to Boston Photo Lab, my buddy Effren at Photo Stop, the always 
courteous and well-ec^ulpped staff and rental department {Charlie) of E.P Levine, Cheryl at Light Sources, Abar Photo 
Lab of Providence, Campus Camera, B&H Fhoto,ar\d Newbun/ Comics for c^uenchlng my Punisher, Wolverine, and Spawn 
urges. Hail to the chief (Joe)... You stuck with it ar\d gee whiz, we even turned out a book in the end. By the way, did 
we have to pay for the lawyers or were thi^ just part of the deal? Gautam gets a gold star for providing the bribes 
which kept me somewhat placated. Stephen (thanks for the experience) and Thomas, sansyour help the book would 
not be. It was a crazy year to say the least, so a special thanks to all of my staff who were able to put up with the 
erratic schedule. To the editors, it's been fun kids, but I'm on vacation time now, so don't call with anymore ACTIVITIES... 
Deb and Tracy, you guys earn honorary staff positions for the pictures you took on your own. Alisa, Alison, Sue, Kerrie, 
Julie, and Barbara, lots o' luck with life after BC. To those left here, Brandi, Laura, and Andrea, may lawyers and other 
demons become confused on the way to your doorstep.. Many hurrahs and pip-pips to the photography chaps at 
the Heights (Kev, Shawn, Dan, Becky, Hideki, Simran) for all their help Additional thanks to five extraordinary Deans, 
your patience and understanding were more than appreciated. All my love to my parents, and eepeclaWy my brother 
for being my number one supporter, thanks George!!! \A/en,you remain the one constant in a turbulent life. Kate person, 
I wish I was smelling strawberry hair again; keep enjoying life. I fear that the verbal blockage spectre commith hither, 
eo I think I'll bid a fond adieu, and take my leave. '\o a unic[ue yearbook staff, I leave y'all with this pretty telling quote... 

"Prosperity tries the fortunate; adversity the great." -- Pliny The Younger 

Fare ye well... ' 



All chrome film produced by Fuji and Kodak (RVP, I^DP II, RHP, PSP RM, LPZ, LPP). Co\or-neqi film was a mix of Fuji and Kodak in 135 ard 
120 (NLP NPS, VPS, PMC, PHP, CH. CZ). Kodak TMX, TMY, TMZ. TK, PX, and llford XP2 films mre used for B&W; printed on llford Multi 
IV, and Kodak Polymax PC papers. Eo^uipment provided by Nikon, Cannon, VAarn\\ja, Minolta, Bessler, Saunders, Tokina, Tamron, and 
Quantum; great toys kids, feel free to send some new ones to my mailing address,.. 



Academics 




\ ^tola 
Editor 



St^ 




Grace Abromaitis 
Erika Dreyer 
Mary M. Keefe 
Anne E. Marshall 



"Leave out conditions, 

Courageous convictions, 

Will drag the dream into existence -" 

Rush 



Where to begin? If anyone had told me what I would be doing now, I would have never believed them. It was tough but we managed to get it done. Many 
thanks to my Academics staff, especially Grace for helping me with the brunt of assignments, and putting up with all the changes I put you through. I also 
would like to thank the Deans and their Secretaries for being understanding and flexible with scheduling changes. Joe: I hope I didn't drive you crazy with ' 
all my questions. You don't know how happy I was that everything was "do-able". I know you will never believe this, but you were the glue that held this 
place together when everything fell apart. You did an incredible job! See, I told you we'd have a book ! For the record, Giants Stadium is and always will 
be in NJ! (You know NJ is close to my heart) Sue: I think we have had just about every conversation under the sun., keep in mind that everything has a theory. 
You did a great job. Thanks for making me feel so comfortable, and yes, you can eat off my meal card anytime. I will see you next year, when you visit. Brandi: 
Well, you have your work cut out for you next year- count me in! It should be interesting. (Dip who ?) It can be done! Just make sure you get all of those 
names! Your input with the layout was invaluable, now for next year.. .Pete: Those Bapst pictures were exactly what I wanted. I am sorry if I drove you crazy 
for pictures. Thanks for understanding- and making everything such fun. I don't know how you did all you did and retained sanity. Tracy and Laura: From 
the day that you guys started on the computer, I knew that we were in for a good time. I really admire your relaxed attitude. L, you better be back next year. 
Alisa and Alison: You two definitely deserve most organized, and maybe most innovative. You found clubs I never knew existed. Deb: You always had 
a smile, and were so agreeable, even though you had one of the toughest sections. I am looking forward to seeing how it came out. Kerrie and Julie: I do 
not envy you, sifting through candids and senior portraits, - 1 just hope that everyone else appreciates what you went through. "Although it's just a memory 
some memories last forever." -R. To the residents of 1st Floor 70 STM, The past two years have been great, may the next two be even better. S&K, I 
apologize for never being there, and only talking about yearbook when I was. Dante: Mussolini would be proud. Beth: Well, you keep things interesting 
as usual, but life size? John: You are truly one of a kind, and you made your impression. "Name is eternal-It carries the past into the future." -GL. To my 
parents- Words cannot express how much your support and sacrifice mean to me-I love you both very much. Barb : Your gift of persistence had been a mixed 
blessing-and yet it keeps me moving! Last but not least, to the graduating Seniors on staff- best of luck, you guys are great, and I know you will do well. 
Please come back and visit us, you know we don't have a window down here. That's all, thanks for the laughs, patience, and frustrations. The finished product 
was worth it. I will miss you! 

Till Next Year. 



470 Academics Section 






S tuden t 
Life 

Co -Editors 

Tracy Hofmann 

Laura Spear 

Stajf 

Nora Francescani 

A&S '95 
Kristen D'Amato 

A&S '95 
Barbara Restaino 

A&S '97 
Rima Nasrallah 

A&S '98 



Thanks to 
Nora for your 
creativity and 
willingness to take time , 
out from your busy schedule- 
your articles were great! Thanks to , 
Andrea for your continued support and 
sympathetic ear. Thanks to Alisa and Allison , 
, for your genorosity in sharing your pictures with 
us when we needed them. Your organization awed us! . 
, Thanks to Kerrie and Julie for showing us how to get things 
. done under pressure and donating candids when we were in a bind. 
. Thanks to Deb for your cheerful, friendly disposition that was so^ 
. welcomed when everyone was stressed. Thanks to Susan for catching our - 
_. mistakes, especially when page numbers were wrong. Your dedication and ^ 
willingness to pick up the slack made things go much smoother. Thanks to Brandi 
Wfor your patience in explaining layouts and your good advice. Thanks to Pete for; 
^^. teaching us how to turn on the computer and putting up with our computer ^ 
^illiteracy-it always liked you better anyway. With our vague photo list,^ 
.you always came through with the pictures we needed. Also thank 
you to the photography staff for making our section stand out. ' 
■ -Thanks to Joe for dealing with our "do it at the last minute . 
philosophy". We appreciate your confidence and,- 
. support this year. Your ability to deal with all. 
^. the obstacles is to be commended. .-^ 
Well Done! Good luck to all the - 
k. graduating seniors. Best wishes. 
^ to a successful future.Finally, 
^ thanks to our room- 
^ mates for your 
^ support. 




Student Life 471 



# 



The grass was greener 
The light was brighter 
The taste was sweeter 
The nights of wonder 
With friends surrounded 
The dawn mist glowing 
The water flowing 
The endless river 
Forever and ever. 



-Fink Floyd 
'High Hopes" 



^ 



Staff: 

Mary Au 

Kenneth Freda 

Nora Francescani 

Michelle Han 

Jennifer Jerutis 

Jovan Mastrof iliappo 

Melissa McGann 

David Shapiro 

Erin Sullivan 

Ann Toohey 



Activities 




Peter Manis 



Co-Editors 

Alisa Gatti 

Alison Logrip 



472 Activities 



SPORTS 



Sports brings out the competition in all of us. There aren't many other facets of life besides sports that allow a person to see 
hard work rewarded with self-satisfaction and victory. Sometimes the victories come as a result of defeating the opponent, and 
sometimes they come by losing to the opponent. Even so, the victories are found in what one gains from the experience of 
giving 110% effort during every minute of play. 

Athletics at Boston College has given us thrills and a great sense of pride, and this year was no exception. Throughout my 
four years here, I was fortunate enough to have lived through the wins against Notre Dame, the storming of the field, a Beanpot 
victory, and the unforgettable journey to the Elite Eight. Although I have witnessed our share of losses, BC will forever remain 
as the school that never lacked character nor class. 

To those who helped demonstrate the essence of BC's character by helping with the creation of Sub Turri's Sports Section, 

To the Sports Staff - Jyoti Mahapatra, Mistie Psaledas, Preeti Garde, Beverly Mather, Amy Arsenault, Lara Farrell, Kevin 
Hodson, and Kevin Massimi - Your dedication and perseverance were unstoppable. I appreciate everything that you did. 

To Pete - Your relentless pursuit of the 'perfect shot' enabled you to capture more emotion than I ever thought was possible. 
Your talent and patience (with me) never died and I am gratefijl for that. 

To Dan - I owe you big!! You developed crucial pictures for me in a clutch, and the fun and laughs will always be 
remembered. 

To Steve - Thanks for getting me into this mess in the first place! Seriously though, you never lacked in guidance, support, 
or humor. (Oh yeah- you too Tom!) 

To Joe, Sue, Brandi, Andrea, Alisa, Alison, Kerrie, Julie, Tracy, Laura, Gautam, Ajay, and Mark - 1 will never forget the all- 
nighters. 

To BC Sports Information - Reid, Dick, Joe, Sue, and Stephanie - Thank you for all of the pictures and press passes and for 
being so patient with me. 

To my roommates - Elizabeth, Beth, Kerri, Karen, and Mary - A kid couldn't ask for better friends. 

To Ignacio 2nd Floor - Did we live on the greatest floor or what? "a^Sj^^a.. 

To my parents and my sister, Tricia - I couldn't have gotten any luckier than to have gotten stuck with all of you. 




3 all of the athletes and coaches - 
hank you for giving us something 
lore to cheer about. Without you, the 
lemories would not be possible. 



% McNamara V5 
wrts Editor 



Sports 473 



Seniors 






Kerrie Doerr & Julie Griffiths 
Co-editors 



Many thanks to the senior staff: 
Julie Ashley 
Stan Orszula 
[ Mona Patel 

Cheryl Swanson 
, Tim Watson 

Sincere thanks to Barbara McGuiness - your extreme patience, hard work 
I and tremendous talent is greatly appreciated. 

Thanks also to the rest of the Sub Turri staff, especially Joe, Susan, Pete and Steve for their 
eternal tolerance, patience and willingness to work with us; We know we pushed you all 

beyond your limits, thanks for sticking with us. 

Finally, thanks to the Class of 1995 for your candid submissions. 
Best of luck in all vour future endeavors. 



474 Senior Co-editors 




Copy Editor, Perspectives Section 

The first of our senses which we should take care never 

to let rust through disuse is that sixth sense, the 
imagination...! mean the wide open eye which leads us 

always to see truth more vividly, to apprehend more 

broadly, to concern ourselves more deeply, to be, all our 

life long, sensitive and awake to the powers and 

responsibilities given to us as human beings." 

Christopher Fry, 
Playwright 



Copy Editor - Perspectives 475 



,< realized I'd look back on my laughing and cry."- Unknown 



Susan E. Spear 

/\e>eoc\ate Editor 




Even though this was my first year on the Sub Turri staff, I think I've gotten a good sense of the pressure and stress of deadlines, 
as well as the sense of fulfillment when pages are completed! Yearbook has certainly been an interesting experience, with many 
ups and downs, but somehow we survived! I would like to thank Andrea for being so diligent and thorough with her section. 
Have fun next year.. .Don't forget the "darkroom theory". I'll be around if you need any advice (non yearbook related, of course.) 
Thanks to Alison for working all those long hours into the night to finish your section. Thanks to Alisa for providing the stability 
we needed in the yearbook office and for keeping an even keel no matter what the crisis. Thanks to Kerrie for putting so much 
time and effort into the Senior section. Thanks to Julie for a lot of laughs during deadlines as the night wore on and we all became 
delirious. Thanks to Barbara for coming through with some great Perspectives articles during crunch time. Thanks to Deb for 
helping with those late, all-night deadlines and for always smiling, even when things were up in the air. Thanks to Tracy for 
keping me on my toes by waiting until the last minute for deadlines. It still amazes me that you guys finished everything on time! 
Thanks to Stan for those much needed food runs and humorous stories to keep us awake at night and for those inspirational words 
that inspired the divider articles. Thanks to Brandi for your expertise, background, and most of all, your sense of humor. Good 
luck next year! I hope things go more smoothly than this year! Thanks to Pete for hours and hours of dedication to the yearbook 
and for sacrificing your sanity for the sake of high quality photos. Thanks to my roommates for putting up with my late hours 
at the yearbook office. 

Last but not least, thanks to Joe, Laura and my parents: Thanks to Joe who always manages to get me into more trouble than 
its worth! You deserve more recognition than you've received for your achievements and I'm glad I was able to share this with 
you. Don't forget where everything began - "...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived; that is to have 
succeeded." Congratulations on your success! Thanks to Laura for making my Senior yearbook even more special because I 
was able to share it with you. I can't wait to see what yours looks like in two years! Enjoy the next few years - college goes by 
so fast! Thanks to Mom & Dad for always being there and supporting me in whatever I do.I love you! Good luck to all the 
graduating seniors and I wish you all the best of luck! Love, ^^.—^ 

476 Associate Editor ^y^UJ'Ot.^vry 




'^^iDiAe a force of naiure 

iDoue snines in m an tj forms 

One nionf we are oafneo in liqnf 

One oaa carried awaa in 

s forms. ^^ ^J\usn 



Ujrandi Cj. <u/emerman 
Jjiananoino Cjcfifor 

Well- this has truly been a labour of love. Or was it insanity? Sometimes I wonder... Senior portraits- 'nuff said. Trekking cross-campus in the middle 
of a blizzard for our staff photo. Pizza runs and quacking computers. Seemed like there always was a new crisis of the day. But all of your hard work 

has really paid off in something that I think is amazing. So to all of you who supported and dealt with me... I give you my thanks and my love. 
Joe— Fm not sure whether to thank you or kill you for getting me into this mess. But seriously- your friendship and your trust in me means more than 
you will ever know. We work well together- quotes and Current Events from Hell. I can't believe you've leaving me. You better not go too far... I'll 
track you down. Susan- To my partner in crime, my gossip confidant, and friend. Thanks for all the sacrifices you made and all the all-nighters! Pete- 
Thank you for being such a first-rate photographer and never settling for anything except the best. And thanks for not squashing me like a grape every 
time I asked for a favor. No one can make me laugh like you do and you give great backrubs too! ! Andrea- Thanks for all the help with "Geek boy." 
Your section looks great, and all the deans are where they are supposed to be. Alisa- You have the patience of a saint! Your smiling face was definitely 
great in this window-less place. Alison- Thanks for always entertaining me with stories of a certain "alien." Julie- Thanks for "escaping" out of the 
infirmary to do your candid pages. We wouldn't have stayed sane without ya! Kerne- I'll never forget the baseball cap and sweats motif for senior 
deadline weekend. I'm sure you won't either! Deb- The phantom sports editor! You always amazed me on how you managed to get everything done in 
such a short amount of time and have it look incredible. Tracy- Us short people have to stick together.Thanks for all your hard work and your ability 
to throw such "interesting" parties. Laura- Thanks for helping to make SL beautiful. I hope ya stick around for the thrill of next year. Stan- ThaiJcs for 

all your help with everything- especially the divider copy. Wanna write about current events? 
To the men of 430- Being with you guys has made this year incredible! I will miss you so much. You guys will always be a part of our family. Sean- 
Yon have really been there for me through everything this year. It'll be our "secret." Derek- We've had some pretty good times, you and I. You are a 
great friend and I will always love ya!! Bill- Dr. VonHoldenberg himself and the hair from hell. Just remember- 1 know what you put in that infamous 

lemonade drink! Lou- I'll always be "Hooked on a Feeling" thanks to you. Good luck in Med. school and I hope you stay nearby in Boston. 

To my roommates in 507- Thanks for putting up with me and my wacked-out schedule. I promise no more singing or "jonquils" till next year. I'll be 

home for dinner this time- 1 promise. I love you guys- you're the best!!! And to Mom -Thanks for always being there as my mother and my best friend. 

Hove you!! 

To everyone who is graduating this year- 1 wish you all the love, success, and happiness in the world. To everyone who is going to be around next year 

with me- same place, same time next year???? Anyone? 



Love always- 




Managing Editor 477 



?/*» 



♦ 




Joseph B. Plurad 



Editor-in-Chief 



"A = r + P (or Adventure equals risk plus purpose.)" 

- Robert McClure 




I must say that running this ship has been quite an adventure. To combine and paraphase the words of my predecessors, putting this book together has 
been one of the most difficult, stressful, and frustrating experiences I've been through. I'm glad it's over though, and I can safely say that I am extremely 
proud of the result. Thanks Beth and Phuong, I can finally crack a smile. The purpose was indeed well worth the risk. Many people here have called 
this project "my book," but I'd like to think of it as "our book," and would like to take the opportunity to personally thank all the people that made the 
1995 Sub Tiirri a reality. I didn't, couldn't, and wouldn't do it alone (nor should any sane person): 

To Peter, Photo Editor Extraordinaire: Thanks for giving your life and an elite anny of photographers to this book, and in the process, provide Sub 
Tiiiri with the best photos the book has seen in years. Now you can get out of the darkroom and breathe clean air. Thanks for sticking it out and contributing 
to the most enlivening and hilarious conversations I've had, especially considering the sometimes tense atmosphere in here...Gautam & Co., for being 
very flexible with the budget, especially during the times we thought we were tight and the troops were hungry. I promise you that all the purchases we've 
made will improve the yearbook (and those to follow). Thanks also for making sure everything was done so we still stood on our own two feet (and for 
doing it more efficiently than last year)...Brandi, for actually taking me up on my offer to stick around. I did promise you that the fun's just begun— was 
I wrongl Your experience, expertise, abilities, and bubbly personality will (mark my words) put out the best yearbook ever, should you stay on and find 
a photo ed. as good as Pete. Good luck next year, and call me if you're drifting. ..Susan, for being amazingly tolerant in the office, even though this place 
tends to bring out the mean streaks in everyone. You've done an outstanding job, picking up any slack that I may have left lying around and ended up 
being the most efficient person here. Thanks for letting me drag you into this and helping me anyway, I'll never forget it.. .Andrea, for managing to be 
the person closest to having stuff done on time. Your humor, presence, and incredibly strong (almost compulsive-5m/7e.') attention to detail will be a great 
asset next year. Good luck!... Tracy, another survivor of Sub Turri '94, who was also crazy enough to come back. Thanks for doing this again with such 
enthusiasm and calmness. I couldn't believe you and Laura were so laid back about what you had to do. It was nice to see that someone was. ..Laura, 
thanks for bringing some sunshine into this windowless office, and as my former Editor-in-Chief warned me, / used to be that way too! The good thing 
is that I don't need to tell you to relax. ..Barbara, for actually wanting to do the Perspectives when we couldn't find anybody to do it. Also, thanks for 
hanging on until we found nominees, trying to contact and interview them, and dealing with the tightest deadlines of any section. ..Alison, for willing to 
come back to Sub Turri after a two-year hiatus, and for the long and meticulous hours you spent on the computer.. .Alisa, for being, at times, the most sane 
person here (maybe it's the air), and calming most of us down in the process. Don't forget Duchesne West, and all the good times over the four years. ..Deb, 
for taking on the most difficult section of the book, doing it with grace and ease, and pulling the all-nighters with Susan and me to make sure stuff was 
sent out before noon on Monday. It is much appreciated... Kerrie, for willing to deal with the Senior section, which is not the most difficult section, but 
the most tedious . I have never seen more drive and motivation in anyone to get the section completed. Your dedication to staying late until the stuff was 
done, and the contributions of you and Julie to keep us on schedule was saint-like. ..Julie, for your layout expertise and willingness to share your talents 
and abilities with Kerrie. I'll never know how you managed to do this with school and the job. Thanks. ..Steve, for seeing this through even though you 
didn 't have to, and for taking great photos. Thanks to Tom for that too, along with your long and odd darkroom hours. . .Stan, for taking care of the Dividers 
copy, making sure we wer^ fed, and for being an amazing roommate... Thanks also to my other amazing (don't want to show any favorites) roommates, 
Chris & Chris for dealing with my long hours and late night returns. Very special thanks to Mom & Dad for letting me come to such a great school, 
and also to R, Dave, Jason, my Grandmothers, and the rest of my family and friends for supporting what I've done here the last four years. Finally, 
thanks to The Heights, all the branches of the University, and all the students, teachers, and staffs for being contributors and subjects for such a great book. 
You all deserve it. Thanks again for a wonderful four years on the Heights. 

Enough. Time for me to go. In the immortal words of Porky the Pig, "That's all folks!" 

.^U^ — 

- Booker T. Washington 
Bolh photos by Peter Manis 



"I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which one has overcome while trying to succeed 

P.S. Thanks to all of you forgetting me through the obstacles and helping me to succeed. - JBP 

478 Editor-in-Chief 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Words and Music by Thomas J. Hurley, Class of 1885 



The 1995 edition of Suh Turri, The Yearbook of 
Boston College, was printed by the School Products 
Division of Jostens in Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina. The 83rd Volume, consisting of 480 
pages, had a press run of 2100 copies and was 
printed from April 3-5, 1995 at the Winston-Salem 
plant. 

COVER: The Cover was created by the ever talented 
Rick Brooks of the Creative Resources Division of 
(ostens, State College. PA. The cover is Maroon 
^490onMission#1212grain,witha4-colorlaminated 
gloss tip-in for the stained glass window, inspired by 
:he window in Gasson 100. Two units of Gold Foil 
'f^380 were used. Each cover was painstakingly 
rubbed with black ink to enhance the design. 
Embossing, debossing and blind embossing 
techniques were also employed in the cover art. 
PAPER: Pages were printed using 100% black ink 
wilh pages 17-480 on dull stock 80 lb. paper, and 
pages I - 1 6 on lustro text 90 lb. paper. The endsheets 
are Parchment Grey, with the print in Maroon #194. 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praise we sing. 

Fondly thy memories 

round our heart still cling. 

Guide of our youth, thro' 

thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

La! on the height. 

Proudly thy tow'rs are 

raised for the Right. 

God is thy Master, 

His Law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 




o 



o 



The Boston College seal is a custom embossed die 
with the Whispertone process applied. One sheet of 
Vellum was tipped in between the front endsheet and 
page 1; color photograph by Peter Manis. Pantone 
dyes and ink were used for the spot color. 
DESIGN: Pages were designed by the Editor-in- 
Chief. Managing Editor, and Section Editors. All 
pages were created using one of Steve Jobs' 
brainchildren's prodigy: Quadra 660AV, Ilci, or Mac 
Classic II, using Aldus' thoroughly bug-ridden 
Pagemaker 5.0. using Jostens' Yeartech Templates, 
and printed on the archaic Apple Personal LaserWriter 
NT. The Eagle on the Endsheets and Divider Pages 
was also created by Rick Brooks, and was first used 
in the 1991 Suh Turri. Rick also provided the 
inspiration for the Divider pages and the Opening, 
and created the background used on these pages. 
Marble B. 

TYPOGRAPHY: All Body Copy and Folios were 
1 2 pt. Times, Captions were 10 pt. Times, and Photo 
Credits were 6 pt. Times. The fonts and sizes of all 



P H O N 

Headlines and Sub-heads were determined by a 
handful of loopy and underpaid section editors. 
PHOTOGRAPHY: Senior Portraits were taken by 
Carl Wol f Studio, Inc., 401 Elmwood Avenue, Sharon 
Hill. PA 19079. Phone: 1-800-969-1338 or 1337. 
Carl Wolf Studio was contracted by Boston College 
to be the Official Yearbook Photographer for the 
1995 Sub Turri. Current Events photos courtesy of 
RM Photo Service. Inc., FDR Station, P.O. Bo,k 452, 
New York, NY 10150. All other photos were taken 
by the Suh Turri Photography Staff using 135 and 
1 20 film formats or submitted by students and various 
University departments. Color photos were recorded 
using the goddess of the color world, Fuji color 
transparency and color negative films, the latter 
having been developed with the tender loving care of 
assorted professional vendors. The shutter buttons 
were depressed with the dainty fingers of the Suh 
Turri photograpy staff Black and white photos were 
taken, developed and printed by the photo staff using 
a slew of Kodak T-Max and Ilford films (Uford 



Multigrade IV RC/Pearl paper) captured with the aid 
of really cool toys manufactured by the Nikon, Canon, 
Quantum, and Mamiya corporations. 

Copyright, 1995, by Sub Turri, The Yearbook of 
Boston College. No portion of Suh Turri may be 
reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any 
means, electronic, mechanical, digital, or otherwise, 
without the expressed, written consent of the current 
Editor-in-Chief Suh Turri was produced entirely by 
a staff of undergraduate student volunteers and 
receives no funding from the University or the Student 
Activities Fee. Suh Turri generates revenue from 
Yearbook Sales, Ads and Donations. Please direct all 
inquiries to: Suh Turri, The Yearbook of Boston 
College. Boston College, McElroy Commons. Room 
103, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. Phone: 617-552- 
3493, Business: 617-552-0898, FAX: 617-552- 
0899. 



Colophon 479 




i^-'f>£;>^ 



■^».^ . 



^or Ujosion 
Words and Music by Thomas J. Hurley, Class of 1885 



iJor Ujos/on, for [Boston, 
We sin^ our proucj refrain ! 



or Ujosion, 



''Uis Wiscfom 'j eari/iftj fane. 

Jor liere all are one 

Cnna /nej'r Aeai^/s are true, 

iMna/ne lowers on i£e y{eiq£ls 

CReacJi to J{eau 'n 's own £[ue. 

Jor Cooslon, for LBos/on, 

^UifflJje ec/ioes rinq atja/nf 



U'or .-Jjosion, for Uioslon, 

Jnu aloru is our own ! 
Jor Moslon, for iBoston, 
Uis nere tnal Uruln is £nown. 
O^ncfeuer wii£ l£e 'Jiiq£i 
i^nalltny neirs oe founcf, 
Uill time snail oe no more 
Uino Inu wor/i is crown 'a. 
^or CBos/on, for CBos/on, 
C?or 'J£ee anJ'J£ine alone. 



BC<?£'^S